The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

07. The Uncommon Story w/ John Kaplan

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Our own John Kaplan tells his own story of a time when he had to decide what it meant to be uncommon.

It’s the story that brought the often-heard phrase, “Who’s doing this?!” that many of you have heard in our Command of the Message® training.

This episode is meant to bring you some motivation and inspiration as you focus on this month, this quarter and this year.

Feel free to share with your teams and colleagues.

Check out The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

You're listening to the audible ready podcast. The show that helps you and your team's sell more faster. will feature sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team at force management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let's get started. Hello, I'm Rachel Clap Miller with force management. Today we bring you a special episode of the audible ready podcast. Our Own John Kaplan tells his story of a time when he had to decide what it meant to be uncommon. It's a story that brought that famous phrase who's doing this? Many of you ever heard it in our command of the message training? It's just a great motivational and inspirational story and that is something we could all use right about now. So enjoy today's special episode of the Audible Ready Podcast. Thanks for listening. So most of you have heard the WHO's doing this or uncommon...

...story, and for those of you who have not, I'm just going to take a little bit of time here to share it with you. So Tony Dunie was a great nfl football player and coach. This is how most of the world identifies with him. However, for me it's different. You know, he wrote a book called uncommon. It's a right read if you have not had the chance. Dungee encourages the reader to be uncommon, to do tough things that the common man or woman would not do. When the book first came out, I felt compelled to share it with my children and I told them it's you know, it's hard to be uncommon. You know the world does not want you to be uncommon. And then I remembered a time in my life when I needed to make a choice to be uncommon. So it was back in the fall of one thousand nine hundred and eighty one I left Michigan on a one way plane ticket to play college football at Boise State University. So you know why did I have to go two thousand miles away...

...from home to play college football? Without getting into a ton of details around that story, let's just say that I was a bit of a rough edge kid in high school. So I packed up all of my possessions and a Green Army Duffel bag and headed out for the rest of my life. Boise was a terrific experience. I had never been west of the Mississippi before and I saw some of the most beautiful parts of the country. I made lifelong friends and grew up a ton. You know, Boise State was an upandcoming program at the time and in would continue to become a household sports name. A lot of people ask me that I play on the famous blue turf. No, I did not. I believe that came around somewhere between one thousand nine hundred eighty five and nineteen and ninety. So by the end of my freshman year I had experienced so many good things. I was fortunate enough to play and letter as a freshman and I did really, really well in the classroom, but I was missing my loved ones badly. You know, my...

...parents never got the chance to see me play that year. My wife, and who's my wife now, my girlfriend at the time. We have a very uncommon history. We've been together since we were thirteen years old. You heard that right, since we were thirteen years old. And needless to say, I was missing her terribly. There was no social media, cell phones, facetime or email. And every time I say that I just chuckle because I sound like my parents, you know, telling a story of, you know, walking to school and bare feet uphill both ways, but that's kind of what it felt like. So my successive boys, he gave me a rare opportunity to transfer to a school closer to home, and the recruitment process a second time around was a completely different experience. You know, just like in work life, nobody cares how you start, they only care about how...

...you finish. So I accepted a scholarship to play at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, and and and beg was one hour away from the University of Michigan, where and was a student. So life was going to be pretty good. A few months before I was to report to training camp at BG I received a letter from the football office and the letter informed me that the two coaches that had recruited me to be g had taken different jobs at different schools. So this letter was from my new coach, who wanted me to report early with the freshman since he made a point of saying he didn't recruit me. And to say that I was shocked as an understatement. I was really looking forward to playing for and being coached by those coaches, so I was really disappointed. Now I'd love to tell you how I took the letter as a personal challenge. You know how I worked out harder and got myself ready to prove myself to the new coaches. But what did I do? I began to eat bond bonds and watch daytime TV and feel really sorry for...

...myself. During my freshman year and my parents moved to another town, and that always makes me chuckles. Yes, they did tell me where they were living. I was not that bad of a kid, but you know, in the new town I didn't know anybody from that area. And in one day that summer I went into a local gym and met a guy named Vince. Vince was a huge human being. He stood about six foot five and wait about two hundred and eighty pounds and and he actually played football for Western Michigan, which is in Bowling Green's conference. So you know, it was kind of odd. But you know, Vince and I became really good friends and we worked out together that summer. Well, when I got the letter, I was mad and started feeling sorry for myself. And you know, as an NCAA athlete you have no recourse for situations like this. If you sign with a team and your coach leaves, your only option is to transfer...

...and lose a year of eligibility. It's a stupid rule, but you know that that arguments for another day. So Vince hadn't seen me at the gym for a couple weeks and so he called me and asked, you know, where have you been? I started to tell him my sad sack story and and he just blurt it out. Hey, get ready, I'm coming over to pick you up to and we're going to go work out. So before I could tell him that I wasn't going to do it, he hung up. Now I mentioned the Vince was six foot five and two hundred and eighty pounds, and so when Vince comes over to Your House and tells you to get in the car, you're probably going to do it. So no problem, I thought. You know, I can do a few curls in the mirror and when I get to the gym I can tone up a little bit. You know, my thoughts were just oozing with sarcasm. So Vince comes to the house, I get the car, he heads out of the neighborhood and drives right past the gym, and so I say to my sudvents, you just passed the gym, he says, Dude, we're not going to...

...the gym today, we're going to go run. Oh, Heck No. I'm thinking to myself, Heck No. Number One, I've always hated running. To get in shape, I would play basketball and other sports all day long, but I could not stand to run around a track. And also the bond bonds and daytime TV had added quite a few extra pounds, so running wasn't going to be very pleasant. So again Vince, at six foot five, hundred and eighty pounds, says that you're going to run, you're going to run. So I'm thinking to myself, okay, I can stretch out a little bit, do a few laps around the track and then, you know, and then call it a day. So we pull up to the high school and start walking towards the track and Vince walks right past the track and I say to him, Vince, where you going? The track is right there, and Vince says we're not running there, we're going to run over here and he points to some woods which had a very steep stare...

...inclined to them and it took to get from one level of the sports fields to the necks. So by this time I've about had it with Vin's but again, if Ben says we're going there, we're going in there. So by the time we actually get to these steps, I can see how incredibly steep they are and that they look like they're going straight up in the air. and Vince turns to me and he says, Hey, who's doing this? So I have no idea what he's talking about, and then he takes off up the steps. And these steps are so steep that his vince goes up, he starts to look small. He goes all the way up to the top and then comes back down and he says to me again, who's doing this, and he didn't wait for reply, just took off again. Now I'm just standing there with a bad attitude watching Vince work out, and after a while I decide this is dumb and I feel foolish, so I start up the steps. About halfway up the steps, my heart was already...

...beating out of my chest and thinking about all the bond bonds and daytime TV that I'm watching and I'm really struggling. So I met Vince, you know, halfway up and by this time he's covered in sweat and huffing and puffing and he says to me again who's doing this, and I'm really starting to get frustrated because I have no idea what he's talking about. So when I got up to the top of the steps, I was gassed, you know. I turned around to look at the view. I looked down to see where I'd come from and I saw Vince chugging away and I looked around and saw the gorgeous view on a on a beautiful day, and in that moment it hit me. I instantly felt uncommon. I was doing something that I did not necessarily want to do, but I did it anyway, knowing that it would set me apart from the common person I would be competing with,...

...and it felt awesome. So I turned and headed down the steps, this time with purpose, and Vince was struggling and he's as he was coming up the steps to pass me, and this time, as he leaned in his big head to ask me, Hey, who's doing this, I cut him off and shouted nobody, nobody, exhausted. He looked at me and he smiled and he said that's right. So it went the rest of that morning. Vince and I passed each other up and down these steps, yelling to one on one another WHO's doing this and yelling back nobody. And I still remember it like it was yesterday. You know, this became the story that I would share with my children when I wanted them to be uncommon, the story of their dad being very common and then making a decision to be uncommon. The world does not want to be uncommon, but we who strive to be elite, we know better. We absolutely know better. So when you're...

...out there with your peers, your teammates, your families and you're working hard to be the best that you can possibly be, look over at someone and ask who's doing this and find joy and conviction in their response of nobody. Nobody. And if they've not heard the story, it would be a great gift to share it with them. So I wish all of you listening to have an uncommon journey to greatness. At force management, we're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience the proof is...

...in our results. Let's get started. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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