The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

33. Executing Great Discovery w/ Brian Walsh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Deals are won or lost in discovery.

 

The more your sales teams can carry out discovery in a way that builds prospect interest and opens doors to high-level business stakeholders, the more they’ll be able to hit their numbers repeatedly.

 

In this episode, Brian Walsh shares personal experiences and tips on the art of great discovery and how your sales teams can earn the right to ask the hard questions and move opportunities forward. He’ll cover:

 

- The three things your sales teams should have prepared before every sales discovery conversation

 

- Why preparing prospects before a call is critical to landing the ask, plus insights on how to do it

 

- Tips for expanding sales conversations in a way that opens up the opportunity to get in front of other stakeholders in the business 

 

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

 

Here are some additional resources on executing great discovery: 

 

- Play Back What You Heard in Discovery Podcast

https://apple.co/2E4HFQD

- Maximize the Effectiveness of Proof Points Podcast

https://apple.co/3iEMrTa

- Our Most Popular Content on Executing Effective Discovery

https://bit.ly/2HYgKHI

You've got to be able to attach to not only the business that you'retalking to, but the person you're talking to you're listening to the audible, ready,podcast. The show that helps you and your teams sell more faster willfeature sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a salesengine that helps you fueel repeatable revenue, growth presented by the team,AF force management, a leader, NBTB sales effectim that let's get started hello and welcome to the audible, ready,podcast, I'm Rachel Clapmiller, and today we are going back to a basic saleskill that can really make or break a lot of opportunities discovery. BrianMalls joins me today: Hi Brian Hi Rachel. How are you I'm good Brian? Youare the perfect person to talk about this, because I don't o that, but okayyeah, you are great at the art of conversation, I will say whether you'reat a dinner party or you are in front of an executive in a sales conversationand good discovery should feel like a great conversation. Yeah, I mean in fact that's what itreally is right and it's funny just what you first said: a basic skill setthat can make or break which means it's not a basic skill set right. That'slike almost interrupted to there because it was almost like. Pleasedon't take offense, but it was a bit of an axy moron if you think about it,it's right to say that a critical lynch tin to sales process in this case is abasic skill. Those things don't match up. Everybody's talked about discoveryfor millenniums, right and and it's still such a difficult art, and I thinkthat's why it's not just science, their sciencist attached to it, but it's alsoon art yeah. I think maybe what I meant by basic ore is that it's somethingthat you kind of learn in sales, one o...

...one, but it's so important that youhave to keep sharpening your skills and it changes out each conversation right,yeah, yea, yeah, and I totally agree with that and it's funny. You say thattoo, because I think we do have a tendency to get taught some discoveryearly on in our sales career, the initial training we go to, but it's soweird to me the number of organizations and times I think backwhere discovery was probably the most critical thing to do, and there was anassumption that people just knew how to do it. Yeah and I've heard you saybefore Brian- that when you are conducting great discovery, you have toearn the right to keep talking and that O is dependent on the conversation. Wehave that term audible ready. Are you audibly ready to shift a conversation,wild needed and earn the right to keep talking, so tey will go through severaltips, and I love to hear a perspective on this, and so I went through andgathered just a couple that we use in our trainings and you can expand onthem and offer some more context for the people listening. The first tip wehave is when you're trying to do discovery with new prospect, its to start broad, butyou don't want to be too generic yeah again. anether critical phrase rightyou're like three for three: it's like start broad, but not to generic whell.What does that mean? What it means is you've got to show up and be relevant right. You've got to beable to attach to not only the the business that you'retalking to, but the person you're talking to Righ, so there's so manylevels, especially in a sale. That's got. Multiple people engages tright onboth sides of the clientside and your company's side, who's doing the actualselling. So you got to show up and be not just ready, but you got to berelevant. You can't just show up- and I know this probably is obvious, but youcan't show up with some sort of hard hitting question right out of the gateright like what are you going to do? If, because, if you think about that you'retaking a real, bold chance, I mean so...

...the moment. You do eventually go thatyou're still taking a chance, so you've got to increase your chances of thosetougher questions landing right. So you know you don't want the prospect toshut down or worse shut. You Down Right, if you haven't, earned the right to getthe information that is more sensitive. That may prove more pain right or startto open up the door to a wider conversation. So you know, I think,showing up Wath a point of view about what you've heard. You know we hadforced management love to talk about playing back. What we've heard inprevious conversations, getting the information that you can get from otherplaces on your own, not asking questions to people at a higher levelthat you can get the answertut from others. So you show up with that pointof view and and you're able to play back what you already know, whichstarts to build a credibility piece right, makes you relevant and then youstart to add in a point of view that starts to soften up this conversation alittle bit right, walk me through your process for or I've UNDERSD. You knowI've already learned about the process, and I saw a couple of things as relateto that and you tell me how you're addressing that right now or how you'rehandling that what happens when that process? Doesn't yield the results thatyou need to tell me about the last time that happened so those are, I think,it's so soft, or even like that last question, which is more of a tell me about the pain. Even that's apretty soft question, if you think about it, it's not difficult for peopleto to sit in that and really get uncomfortable right into your point. Ifyou have a relevant point of view to this particular customer they'realready going to feel like you understand at least part of of whatthey're dealing with right now, yeah that's right, yeah and they also knowhey you've done your work right. You've come prepared because you know we loveto talk about the concept that, if you ask somebody a question, that's notrelevant to them and we have a tendency to do that in the wrong direction. Theyhave a tendency to ask those questions to people at higher levels and theirquestions of people at lower levels.

Can answer they're going to send youdownstairs right or across the hall and you're, potentially closing ha doorbehind you that may never open again yeah yeah, I think also in this area.My favorite tip of yours that you've often say is when you're looking foryour questions, use them to get them talking about positive things, becauseit's a great way to get the conversation going yeah and you knowand thit's. I think this goes back to my comment about art versus science.Right, I think stylistically you got to do what works for you stylistically.For me, one of the things that works really well is getting people talkingabout. What's working well and as a result, a couple of things willcyfically happen, one. They already know what you're about to do so: You'resetting the states to pestentially pivot to the other side of that coin.But in all likelihood you know, people know how you're made up. They can tellpretty quickly whether or not you're genuine and if you're, if you're,genuine. In all likelihood, people are going to start to open up and start togive you of you into whether or not there are some concerns or some issuesanor some things that aren't going as positively as they'd like, so ittypically makes it easier to even make that pivot. It's not a hard okay. Wejust talked about the good stuff. Now it's talk about bad stuff that rarelyi's the case, but even if you have find yourself at that end of the spectrum,it's still easier to make Dhath Pivit, because okay, we've agreed that youwant to talk about the following topic. Therefore, I'm going to start withwhat's working, but you know, what's coming, I'm going to ask you to talk tome about where the holes are and what's happening as a result. In fact, youknow just recently, I was talking to a client about these things. We callvalue drivers right these, these issues that our customers care about, that wecan attach to because we help solve them better differently than others,and it hit bekind of in the moment, very specifically something that kindof swam around my sor swam around whatever the right word is I mak entirecareer, but it hit me that you know the...

...moment you attach to topic that the customer cares about,for their business. Is the moment that the gloves come off, because thecustomer has chosen that I want to talk about this topic. Therefore, they'veautomatically opened up the door yeah for you to go, do deep discovery sothat, in and of itself, I think, should be a freeing concept for people to sayit's, okay, to force them to sit in the pain, it's okay, to get them to thinkabout what's possible. On the other side, it's okay to go back and say hey!I understand how this problems affecting you. What about the otherthree people in the followe roles that we also know typically, are part ofthis discussion? How does this impact them? How do we better understand that,from their perspective, because you know I was making a note as we weregetting ready for this Rachel and and I came across something else that Italked about a lot over the years, which is as a seller you're going to beviewed one or two ways right: you're, either doing something for people oryou doing something to them, and that will come out pretty quickly and andthe seller, who does something for people? One of their skill sets is aconfidence and a point, an a bit of a point of view that says: Listen, I'mgoing to help you get to a great outcome for you, and that don't justmean you personally, I just mean the collective you and if I'm not the rightchoice, that's okay! I'll figure that out before you do so. Some of this isstyle. Some of this is just personal intestinal fortitude right. The oil ofthe willingness to you knew at what's needed, and I think the other big thingis preparation, if that, if that makes sense, yeah, I think that's a kid tothings come to mine. The the preparation, you should have a roadmapfor the conversation and be ready to pivot. Based on what you hear if you'redoing great listening mean I've been on those calls, I was recently onone. Iwas...

...where I could tell the our rap was justgoing down the questionless. There were a vendor of ours, an was just goingdown the question list for the contract for no all, and I just stopped him, Isaid: Did you just go through a sales train? You O A script, you know Trid to sell force management, but no,what was he honest? He was was and they had just completed a training and hewas really trying to stick to that process and he had arotemap, but the problem was, is he wasn't listening to me and he didn'tknow how to pivot that question tack. Based on what I said, and you know I just had another thought Brian, Icome from a journalism background. I did investigative journalism fo bit andwhen you go into those hard hitting interviews, it's ust very similartechnique. Is You know where you want to get to in the commed Don? You knowwhat you want that person to say, but it's a dance to go when you want to askthat question like I'm not going to say: Did you steal the money for my firstquestion and we're not talking about that here,but getting people to talk and reveal information? They have to be able totrust you and they have to be able to feel like you are listening to them andit's very difficult to do that. If you don't prepare n the other comment, Iwas just talking to John Caplin about this and he was answering a questionsomebody had asked him about, but I don't want to go in and feel negative.I don't want to have this negative tone to the conversation and he's he said,and I like to get your perspective on Thi. To is just remember, you're notbeing negative. The problem is negative right. Ri Problems, Lik you're there tohelp them solve it. It's revealing the problem, that's negative, not yet yeah.Well, it's and so. First of all, I'm in Fil and agreement with that statement.Right, I think it's sthing. It's really...

...well said. I would suggest this attacheback to my comment earlier about style. You know, I think you got to getcomfortable with how you're going to set up discovery with clients thatworks for you and and the market place that you call on. So let me just giveyou kind of a couple examples, one in terms of prep, I'm a big believer thatyou should always have three things: prapped walking into a conversation.The first is what's the objective of the meating, and do we have a griementon this right and with the client? Do we all agree on what the objective forthe conversationist to what's the agenda to get there, and how is mytiming or choreography with the the other people are going to be in themeaning? How is that built around that right? Those are both things that mightrecall. Mik might require inaudible right. When I get to the meeting, Ithink I'm showing up to meet with you and you bring to other people thatwhole plan might get thrown out the window, but I'm ready and if I'm ready,even if something like that happens, there's a higher chance that I canreact to it more positively. The third thing is: What's the ask going to bemeeting my objective today is to get Rachel to give me a betterunderstanding of what's happening inside of her department, what theimpacts are for her and her team, and also help me start to understand whoelse inside of her company is impacted by this, and the way I'm going to dothat my agenda is to play through with her and whoever else he brings to themeeting a conversation around talk walkme through your current process.Walk me through. What's working walk me through? What's not, how could we painta picture of the future? I've got a handful of discovery, questions in mine,maybe I'm going to run it. I used to run a lot of discovery calls withcustomers as a workshop, where we use sticky notes, O put them up on the wall.Whatever that's my agenda and then, what's my ask, my ask: is at themeeting goes well as I expected to or but goes in, the direction expect toI'm going to ask Rachel to sponsor a meeting with the following other twoexecutives right, whatever that as might be, and I'm a big believer thatRachel in this case should be fully...

...aware of all three of those thingsbefore the meeting takes place. So the meingis going to be on Monday sometimetoday, tomorrow, Friday, I'm going to make sure Rachel Nos heres, my Objectin,for the call her te agenda. Is there anything that you would want to changeor add and Ol by the way? Just so you know if the meeting oes well and wherewe think it might go. If it's appropriate. I'm going to ask you theend of the meeting to sponsor meeting with the following of acouple of folks or e, The two folks that we identify in the meeting thatare critical to get ing to a collective. Yes, that in and of itself is anexample of what grade. Discovery looks like because now we're walking into themeeting with clear purpose process payoff right. That's part, one of this,the other thing to the point about asking the questions, the toperquestions and not feeling uncomfortable doing that stialistically. That's whereI think you got to get comfortable with wonce t works for you. I have some keyphrases that I used with plaents that I was taught and they still work today. Iused one with the CESDAY. We knows as well and he laughed he said. I knewyouwere going to say that at some point but and then he said, but I know youmean it right and I said: Listen Daniel, whether you do business with ourorganization on this project or not, and he ne exactly what was coming. I'mgoing to give you something to think about that. You haven't put on thetable yet so like that works. For me, the other thing that works for me,especially when you start to getting of these togher questions around discovery,because we're right we're talking great discovery, but we're kind of going tothe negative consequence piece a little bit. But when I get into the tougherquestions, I'm really comfortable, saying, listen at some- and I repeatthis multiple times during the sales process. Right, look just rememberwe're trying to answer three questions here right. The first question is: Whywould you guys do anything, and the second question is: Why would you do itnow right, hat's, all around the business challenges the business howtcomes, what's require, etc, and then the third question is: Why would youchoose anyone to help you do that,...

...whether it's my company or somebodyelse? Why would you choose force management right? Why would you chooseour security capabilities, whatever that might be a Avendor, so findsomething that works for you that helps the customer realize you'rein this for me right, because that that one it softens it up a little bit andto it makes it. It often makes it easier for you to ask tougher questionsthat are in your head, that you know you got to get the antweres or nowyou're, just throwing up a hail. You know a prayer and a hail, marry path.Sure Sur well, and you know the other question. I know that we get a lot fromrebs, you mentione the negative consequences Yep. When do you know thatyou've done enough discovery and you can kind of Hivit the the conversationto sharing more about your solution. How do you O that's a great question, because youknow traditionally a lot of people, Ave, mentaut hay, you know get to theproblem and then start selling, which means pipothy yourself, and you knowthat I I know that you know this. We believe in a couple of things. One isthe first way is to pivot to yourself. Without talking about yourself and whatI mead by that is, if I've got a set of issues of consequence for the customerthat we can attach to im wich it we can alsolve before I start overtly talkingabout my products and services, I instead help the customer think throughwhat's possible if they effectively deal with what we're talking about. Ifyou effectively solve those issues in those problems, what does life looklike on the other side, and I probably because I probably have a lot moreexpertisue in this space than the customer? Does I probably have a pointof view that they don't have so what I'm really trying to do is help themthink through what's possible by sharing stories of what other customershave achieved, what we've seen other people be able to do to resolve theissues, and by doing that, I'm talking about myself without talking aboutmyself right. What I'm sharing is these experiences that we have these outcomes.We've helped other people achieve, but...

I'm not sharing with with them the, andwe did it in the following way with the following capabilities and technologyand services etce. It's a say: I've had other a couple, other clients that lookjust like you in terms of the issues that they're struggling with, we wereable to get your counterpart plus the followingtor other people in room andas we work through that these ware the outcomes they were able to drive to sonow what I've started to do. I've actually started the pivot to aconversation about myself, but it's still focused on who you are and whatyou're trying to achieve, because remember what we're trying to do we'retrying to get to a point where the list of requirements is so well thought outthat when I do open my mouth specifically about my products andservices, everything that comes out of my mouth really lands, because it's allaround solving for the outcomes. So it's almost like a a Texas two stepright. I have this great conversation about you and I start to Pivit about me.But it's really still all about you right it, because it's about theoutcomes you can drive and the things that you can achieve and the impacts Yocan have on the business before even start to talk about how we enable thatvery specifically. So that's how I would suggest it is almost like. Do thesoft move first and then make sure the requirements are laid out and fullyvetted so that when you do open your mouths very specifically about yourself,it clearly can attach back to the outcomes you trying to drive to byresolving the issues, and it comes back to understanding the proofpwaints inyour archatistion. We have a podcast. We just published on proof points O,encourage everybody to check that out and and one of the things we talk aboutthere I mean it's one thing to know the matric, a misurable results, but esespecially in these conversations. You need to know thes story yeah behind it,which can help showing that Delta that you are just talking about. Well, it'sanother great example of great discovery. Right, everybody- and I dothis when I'm in a room with a group of people, you know I'll say to anorganization of twenty or two hundred or whatever. The number is hey. What'sthe big story here right and somebody...

...always some O yeys raises her hand andthey throw ut the name of a fortune. Five Hundred Company and they'll say:Oh it's, you know Walmart or Chafe Bank or whatever you know some big companywhere they did where they did business at got a big win. So I say: What's Thestory and then I get little bits and pieces from different people right.Somebody can give me one sentence. Somebody else gives you a little bitmore and before you know what I'm getting different information thatdoesn't dive, and I finally stop and say: here's what I want. I want oneperson in this room to give me the business problem. We help the customersthink through the solution that we enabled for them, and the businessresult that they were able to get and about fifty percent of the time.Somebody in the room cou do that for me really really fluently or eloquently,and then I askd a question. I say how many people have actually told thatstory to a customer. Jost be honest: How many of Yho Ave reference thataccounts that win to another potential custorer you know and sixty seventyeighty percent of the hands go up, and then I say: okay, now keep your hand up.If you actually helpe create that story, every hand goes down, except for one ortwo and the point I'm trying to make is: Ifyou're going to tell somebody else's story, you better know it cold number,one but number but number. Two. The best stories are the ones that youcreate and the goodness is. You only need two or three in your hip pocket.If you have two or three great stories in your hip pocket that apply to themarketplace that you call on, you can typically spin those a couple ofdifferent ways as appropriate to get your point across, but that's anotherexample of great discovery right, as you said, for all the way, thebeginning, great discovery is about your ability to hold a conversation,and a conversation is not question. T answer. Question Answer. QuestionAnswer. So I'm really glad you brought that up and I hope that that kind ofwent where you wanted it jusof course. Yes, where do you think I mean Brian,you teach this a lot. Where do you think raps in particular? Where do theygo wrong? Most with discover? That's a great question. I think number one. We have a tendencyto think we have to talk about...

...ourselves a lot. We think that, becausea customers taking time and the first thing that often comes out of acustomers, possentials customers mouth- is hey- tell me about your stuff ortell me about your company or Hey. We think we need something, and we didsome research and looks like your company has that. Can I see a demo likethere's that opening salvo from a customer that says talk about yourself, and so we think? Oh, we better talkabout ourselves and sure go ahead and talk about yourself, but what I believeyou should do is talk about yourself in terms of how it relates to the client,meaning. Well, Hey we're a twenty year old company can't wait to tell you morespecifically about who we are, but let me make sure you know that these arethe conversations we're having with other customers. This is where we arerelevant right, so, let's make sure we're in the right slimlane for you.What kind in your mind that would be relevant for the two of us to betalking about so hi think that's the first thing. The second thing is: Don'tjump at the first thing you hear right a meeting, don't take that first thingout of a customers mouth and run to the racist to talk about how you can sultfor that force them to expand upon it, force them to think about all of thenegative consequences associated with whatever they're dealing with not justfor themselves or their team or their department for the rest of the businessshow up with a point of view, really understand how these decisionstypically get made so that you can listen for things that are missing andsay well, you know Rachel t's funny that you would say that totally agreethat the following ofther couple, people ould typically be impacted, butyou know when we're having these conversations of their oherinzations.It's not olike fers your caring, those two folts, but we have found that theperson who runs reconciliation and accounting gets impacted by this or theCFO gets impacted by this. What's your take, or what have you heard from themon this topic so like expand on what you're hearing don't just run to solveit? If that makes sense, because that really gets your mind around this thing-that everybody aforce management knows...

...that I've been evangalizing on, whichis the thing called the collective yes right and then last but ot least, don'tdelegate yourself down. We often delegate ourselves down by our lack ofpreparation or by the questions that we ask, or by our unwillingness to ask thetough questions I mean I said to the Co. I was speaking to theother day. I said: listen, you're at a point right now, where you've made aninvestment. You've got tome executives who are engaged an then investment.You've got a new executive on your team, whos questioning that exacto thatinvestment and I asked for permission to speak freely, and he said yes, Isaid it sounds like the five or six of you need to get around the table andmake a decision on. What's right for the business now I had to earn the right to say that,where I've known this person a couple of years, I never would have said thatto him the first time I met him, but you know we've earned the right throughwhat we've done for him and his company to to say things like that and to be anhonest broker and Ol by the way these people are looking to maybe do somebusiness with us or somebody else. So this is not A. I like you, you like me,can you know? Can you tell me something new? This is a we're going to spendsome money kind of conversation, so don't delegate yourself down be willingin the right way at the right time and this II'm the first amit. Some of thisis an educated set of guesses right based on what you've done and what youknow, etce, but don't be afraid to say what needs to be said in a way thatthat's appropriate yeah. You know you mentioned that tip about expanding yourconversation and that's a good way to think about bringing in other people todo more discovery, getting additional points of view which could fuel thenext step and you've always said Brian, that we need to own the next steps. Inthe conversation, don't let the prospect onl the next steps you on thenext APS, right, yeah and hatit goes...

...back to what I talked about a littlebit ago about being prepared right with an objective and AAGENDA and the ask wehave a tendency to know what we want to ask for, and we don't prepare for thatask, and so we clumsily ask for it at the end of a meeting, and we wonder whythe client looks at us like a deer of the headlihes right. Well, we didn'tasport very well and to they didn't know W at was Comong. You know whatgood looks like in these engagements. If you've been in your role for aperiod of time or you've been well trained or you've thought trugh or themeeting Etceta, you know what the next steps appropriately are to really helpa claim, make a great decision so put that on the table, and that's why I sayput it on the table on the front end: Rachel, Dedes, R, Ar Jectuce for today,here's the agend on how we want to get there as anything changed since we granon that. Let since last week no okay good is I mentioned in my note or inour conversation, if the conversation goes the right way today and it'sappropriate at the end, the appropriate ext step is typically for us to have atechnical, deep dive with someone in Ik and at the same time, have an nrliconversation with someone on the business side of this. So I'm going tobe asking for you to sponsor those couple of meetings. It's not a questionat that point. It's just that! So you 't have to ask for permission. You haveto say: IS THAT OKAY ND? It's like that's what I'm going to ask for if themeeting goes well now, you're ready for that, and what's beautiful in my mindabout that, is it's obvious to everybody at the end of the meeting,whether or not Dheath's going to be an appropriate ask. So now I can takecontrol and say: Hey Rachel. We learned something today, a couple thingsintoday's meeting that make me realize that initial thing I thought we mightbe asking for today is not the appropriate next step. I actually thinkthe appropriate exscep is for us to do some deeper discovery with thefollowing two people to better understand the process or the issueswere trying to help solve. How do we get that set up right? I mean or...

Rachel here's what I heard today'smeeting it lines up D, specifically with where I thought we might go. I washundred percent sure we were going to learn, but I think it's pretty obviousat this point that an Rli conversation with the right folks on the on thebusiness side and a DDI technical conversation around whether or notApproov of concepts going to be appropriate and what the successpensures for that would be is the appropriate to next steps. How do weget those two meetings set up because you already know what it's going to ask,so I never so the beauty o that is. I never have to ask permission to ask forthat, because I've told you I'M GOINGNO: Do it Yeah Yeah? So if theyre, this issuch a big and anmedy topic Bryan. Thank you for all the tips that youstared today around the best practices, but would preparation be a bottom line?You would share what would be the bottom line. I think I ti s yeah. Ithink I'd share three things. One is pre one, its preparation, as Idescribed a couple in a couple different times in places during thepodcast two attached to that would be don't prep alone. So I'm thinking about a guy that I worked with for a longtime and Dan was so polished in front of a customer when it came to discoverybecause Dan never let an important discovery, conversation happend withoutreally great planning and choreography meaning. If somebody else was going onthe call with Dan or multiple were going on on the callet Dan. The damdidn't care if he was out in front or a supporting cast member, but Dan didcare and was really good at driving. How that conversation was going to go.His sense of understanding of the importance of great choreography wasjust so so so tremendous, and so many peoplelearned that skill from from working with him- and I think the last thingthat I would put on the table here in terms of of the bottom line- is this conceptthat discovery never stops right. You...

...are, you know, discovery, sometimes,there's a sale stage in people's egager process called discovery, andpeople like okay, do I'm in discover here and then I go to the proposal andthis no, no no discovery is happening every step of the way. Righte. All theway up, toon, including the clothes and past the clothes because we're tryingto ensure that we either get the cross ell or the upcell or the renewal rightwere always doing discovery. That's that's the critical thing you remember,never stops never sops great. Thank you so much for this conversation today,Brian Thanks Rachel, I appreciate t wit a lot of fun as always, yes, and thankyou to all of you for listening to the audible, ready, podcast at force management. We're focused ontransforming sales organizations into elite teams, are proven methodologies.Deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenuegrowth, give your teams the ability to execute the gross strategy at the pointof sale. Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's getstarted visit us at force. Managementcom you've been listening tothe audible, ready podcast to not miss an episode subscribe to the show inyour favorite podcast player. Until next time.

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