The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

33. Executing Great Discovery w/ Brian Walsh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Deals are won or lost in discovery.

 

The more your sales teams can carry out discovery in a way that builds prospect interest and opens doors to high-level business stakeholders, the more they’ll be able to hit their numbers repeatedly.

 

In this episode, Brian Walsh shares personal experiences and tips on the art of great discovery and how your sales teams can earn the right to ask the hard questions and move opportunities forward. He’ll cover:

 

- The three things your sales teams should have prepared before every sales discovery conversation

 

- Why preparing prospects before a call is critical to landing the ask, plus insights on how to do it

 

- Tips for expanding sales conversations in a way that opens up the opportunity to get in front of other stakeholders in the business 

 

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

 

Here are some additional resources on executing great discovery: 

 

- Play Back What You Heard in Discovery Podcast

https://apple.co/2E4HFQD

- Maximize the Effectiveness of Proof Points Podcast

https://apple.co/3iEMrTa

- Our Most Popular Content on Executing Effective Discovery

https://bit.ly/2HYgKHI

You've got to be able to attachto not only the business that you're talking to, but the person you're talkingto. You are listening to the audible ready podcast, the show that helpsyou and your team's sell more faster. Will feat your sales leader sharing theirbest insights on how to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenuegrowth, presented by the team at force management, a leader in BTB saleseffectiveness. Let's get started. Hello and welcome to the audible ready podcast.I'm Rachel Clad Miller, and today we are going back to a basic salesskill that can really make or break a lot of opportunities, discovery. BrianWalls joins me today. Hi Brian, Hi Rachel, how are you?I'm good, Brian. You are the perfect person to talk about this,because I don't about that, but okay, no, you are great at theart of conversation. I will say whether you're at a dinner party oryou are in front of an executive in a sales conversation, and good discoveryshould feel like a great conversation. Yeah, I mean, in fact, that'swhat it really is, right, and it's funny, just what youfirst said. A basic skill set that can make or break which meets it'snot a basic skill set. Right. That's like I almost interrupted to therebecause it was almost like, please, don't take offense, but it wasa bit of an see more on. If you think about it, it'sright to say that a critical lynchpin to a sales process in this case isa basic skill. Those things don't match up. Everybody's talked about discovery forfor millenniums, right, and and it's still such a difficult art and Ithink that's why it's not just science. There's science has attached to it,but it's also in art. Yeah, I think maybe what I meant bybasic or is that it's something that you...

...kind of learn in sales on onebut it's so important that you have to keep sharpening your skills and it changeseach conversation. Right. Yeah, yeah, and I totally agree that. Andit's funny you say that too, because I think we do have atendency to get taught some discovery early on in our sales career, the initialtraining we go to. But it's so weird to me the number of organizationsand times I think back, where discovery was probably the most critical thing todo and there was an assumption that people just knew how to do it.Yeah, and I've heard you say before, Brian, that when you are conductinggreat discovery, you have to earn the right to keep talking and thatis dependent on the conversation. We have that term audible ready. Are youaudibly ready to shift the conversation we needed and earn the right to keep talking? So today we'll go through several tips and I love to hear your perspectiveon this, and so I went through and gather just a couple that weuse in our trainings and you can expand on them and offer some more contextfor the people listening. The first tip we have is when you're trying todo discovery with new prospect is to start broad, but you don't want tobe too generic. Yeah, again, another critical phrase. Right, you'relike three, four, three. It's like start broad, but not togeneric. What what does that mean? What it means is you've got toshow up and be relevant. Right, you've got to be able to attachto not only the the business that you're talking to, but the person you'retalking to. So there's so many levels, especially in a sale that's got multiplepeople engaged right on both sides, the client side and your company's side, who's doing the actual selling. So you've got to show up and benot just ready, but you've got to be relevant. You can't just showup, and I know this probably is obvious, but you can't show upwith some sort of hard hitting question right out of the gate right, like, what are you going to do if because if you think about that,you're taking a real bold chance. I mean so the moment you do eventuallygo that, you're still taking a chance.

So you've got to increase your chancesof those tougher questions landing right. So you know, you don't wantthe prospect to shut down or, worse, shut you down right if you haven'tearned the right to get the the information that is more sensitive, thatthat may prove more pain right or start to open up the door to awider conversation. So, you know, I think showing up with a pointof view about what you've heard. You know, we have forced management loveto talk about playing back what we've heard in previous conversations, getting the informationthat you can get from other places on your own, not asking questions topeople at a higher level that you can get the institute from others. Soyou show up with that point of view and and you're able to play backwhat you already know, which starts to build a credibility piece right, makesyou relevant, and then you start to add in a point of view thatstarts to soften up this conversation a little bit. Right. Walk me throughyour process for or I've understood you know. I've already learned about the process andI saw a couple of things as relates to that. Can you tellme how you're addressing that right now or how you're handling that? What happenswhen that process doesn't yield the results that? You need to tell me about thelast time that happened. So those are I think it's so soft,or even like that last question, which is more of a tell me aboutthe pain. Even that's a pretty soft question if you think about it.It's not difficult for people to sit in that and really get uncomfortable right intoyour point. If you have a relevant point of view to this particular customer, they're already going to feel like you understand at least part of what they'redealing with right now. Yeah, that's right. Yeah, and they alsoknow, hey, you've done your work right, you've come prepared, because, you know, we love to talk about the concept that if you asksomebody a question that's not relevant to them, and we have a tendency to dothat in the wrong direction. They have a tendency to ask those questionsto people at higher levels and their questions...

...that people at lower levels can answer. They're going to send you downstairs right or across the hall and you're potentiallyclosing a door behind you that may never open again. Yeah, yeah,I think also in this area, my favorite tip of yours that you've oftensay is when you're looking for your questions, use them to get them talking aboutpositive things, because that's a great way to get the conversation going.Yeah, and you know, and it's I think this goes back to mycoming about art versus science. Right. I think stylistically, you got todo what works for you stylistically. For me, one of the things thatworks really well is getting people talking about what's working well and, as aresult, a couple of things will typically happen. One, they already knowwhat you're about to do, so you're setting the states to potentially pivot tothe other side of that coin. But in all likelihood, you know,people know how you're made up. They can tell pretty quickly whether or notyou're genuine and if you're kind, if you're genuine, in all likelihood peopleare going to start to open up and start to give you of you intowhether or not there are some concerns or some issues or some things that aren'tgoing as positively as they'd like. So it typically makes it easier to evenmake that pivot. It's not a hard okay, we just talked about thegood stuff. Now let's talk about bad stuff. That rarely is the case, but even if you have find yourself at that end of the spectrum,it's still easier to make that pivot because, okay, we've agreed that you wantto talk about the following topic. Therefore, I'm going to start withwhat's working, but you know what's coming. I'm going to ask you to talkto me about where the holes are and what's happening as a result.In fact, you know, I just recently I was talking to a clientabout these things we call value drivers. Write these issues that our customers careabout, that we can attach to because we help solve them better differently thanothers, and it hit me kind of in the moment, very specifically somethingthat kind of swum around mines, or swam around whatever the right word is. I make entire career, but it hit me that, you know,the moment you attached to a topic that...

...the customer cares about for their businessis the moment that the gloves come off, because the customer has chosen that Iwant to talk about this topic. Therefore, they've automatically opened up thedoor, yeah, for you to go do deep discovery. So that inand of itself, I think should be a freeing concept for people to sayit's okay to force them to sit in the pain. It's okay to getthem to think about what's possible on the other side. It's okay to goback and say, Hey, I understand how this problems affecting you. Whatabout the other three people in the following rolls that we also know typically arepart of this discussion? How does this impact them? How do we betterunderstand that from their perspective? Because, you know, I was making anote as we were getting ready for this Rachel and I came across something elsethat I talked about a lot over the years, which is, as aseller, you're going to be viewed one of two ways right. You're eitherdoing something for people or you're doing something to them, and that will comeout pretty quickly. And and the seller who does something for people, oneof their skill sets is a confidence and a point and a bit of apoint of view that says, listen, I'm going to help you get toa great outcome for you, and I don't just mean you personally. I'mjust being the collective you. And if I'm not the right choice, that'sokay, I'll figure that out before you do. So some of this isstyle, some of this is just personal intestinal fortitude right the oil of thewillingness to do what's needed. And I think the other big thing is preparation. If that, if that makes sense? Yeah, I think that's a kid. Two things come to mind. The preparation. You should have aroad map for the conversation and be ready to pivot based on what you hear. If you're doing great listening means. I've been on those calls. Iwas recently on one. I was where...

I could tell the our wrap wasjust going down the question. As we're there were a vendor of ours,which is going down the question list for the contract for Noel, and Ijust stopped him. I said, did you just go through a sales traine? You bought the script? You know, I try to sell force management,but no, what was he honest? Yes, he was. was andthey had just completed a training and he was really trying to stick tothat process and he had a roadmap. But the problem was is he wasn'tlistening to me and he didn't know how to pivot that question track based onwhat I said, and I you know, I just had another thought, Brian. I come from a journalism background. Dad Investigative Journalism for a bit,and when you go into those hard hitting interviews, it's it's very similartechnique. If you know where you want to get to in the conversation,you know what you want that person to say, but it's a dance toyeah, when you want to ask that question, like I'm not going tosay, did you steal the money from a first question right, and we'renot talking about that here. But getting people to talk and reveal information,they have to be able to trust you and they have to be able tofeel like you are listening to them, and it's very difficult to do thatif you don't prepare. And the other comment. I was just talking toJohn Kaplan about this and he was answering a question somebody had asked him about. But I don't want to go in and feel negative. I don't wantto have this negative tone to the conversation. And he he said, and Ilike to get your perspective on it too, is just remember you're notbeing negative. The problem is negative, right, problem is may if you'rethere to help them solve it, it's revealing the problem that's negative, notyou. Yeah, well, it's in. So I first of all I'm inviolent agreement with that statement. Right, I think it's I think it's reallywell said. I would suggest this...

...attached spect to my comment earlier aboutstyle. You know, I think you got to get comfortable with how you'regoing to set up discovery with clients that works for you and and the marketplace that you call on. So let me just give you a kind ofa couple examples. One in terms of prep I'm a big believer that youshould always have three things prepped walking into a conversation. The first is what'sthe objective of the meeting and do we have agreement on this right and withthe client? Do we all agree on with the objective for the conversations towhat's the agenda to get there? And how is my timing or choreography withthe other people who are going to be the meeting? How is that builtaround that? Right? Those are both things that might recall. Myke mightrequire in audible right when I get to the meeting. I think I'm showenough to meet with you and you bring to other people, that whole planmight get thrown out the window, but I've I'm ready and if I'm ready, even if something like that happens, there's a higher chance that I canreact to it more positively. The third thing is what's the ask going tobe meeting? My objective today is to get Rachel to give me a betterunderstanding of what's happening inside of her department, what the impacts are for her andher team, and also help me start to understand who else inside ofher company is impacted by this. And the way I'm going to do that, my agenda is to play through with her and whoever else he brings tothe meeting a conversation, sation around talk, walking through your current process. Walkme through what's working, walk me through what's not. How could wepaint a picture of the future? I've got a handful of discovery questions inmind. Maybe I'm going to run it. I used to run a lot ofdiscovery calls with customers as a workshop, where we use sticky notes and putthem up on the wall. Whatever. That's my agenda. And then what'smy ask my ask is, at the meeting goes well as I expectit to or it goes in the direction I expect to, I'm going toask Rachel to sponsor a meeting with the following other two executives right whatever thatasks might be, and I'm a big believer that Rachel in this case shouldbe fully aware of all three of those...

...things before the meeting takes place.So the meeting's going to be on Monday, sometime today, tomorrow, Friday.I'm going to make sure Rachel notes. Here's an objective for the call.Here's the ATTENDA. Is there anything that you would want to change oradd? And, Oh, by the way, just so you know,if the meeting goes well and where we think it might go. If it'sappropriate, I'm going to ask at the end of the meeting to sponsor ameeting with the following other couple of folks or because that could the two folksthat we identify in the meeting that are critical to getting to a collective yes, that in and of itself is an example of what great discovery looks like, because now we're walking into the meeting with clear purpose. Process payoff right. That's part one of this. The other thing to the point, aboutasking the questions, the tougher questions, and not feeling uncomfortable doing that.stylistically, that's where I think you got to get comfortable with what's works foryou. I have some key phrases that I use with clients that I wastaught and they still work today. I used one with a CEO yesterday whoknows as well, and he laughed. He said, I knew you're goingto say that at some point, but and then he said, but Iknow you mean it right and I said listen, Daniel, whether you dobusiness with our organization on this project or not, and he knew exactly whatwas coming. I'm going to give you something to think about that you haven'tput on the table yet. So, like that works for me. Theother thing that works for me, especially when you start to getting a thesetougher questions around discovery, because we're right, we're talking a great discovery, butwe're kind of going to the negative consequence piece a little bit. Butwhen I get into the tougher questions, I'm really comfortable saying listen at somepoint, and I repeat this multiple times during the sales process. Right,look, just remember we're trying to answer three questions here. Right. Thefirst question is why would you guys do anything? And the second question iswhy would you do it now? Right, I'm all around the business challenges,the business health comes, what's Requie, etc. And then the third questionis, why would you choose anyone to help you do that, whetherit's my company or somebody else? Why...

...would you choose force management? Right, why would you choose our security capabilities, whatever that might be as a vender? So find something that works for you, that helps the customer realizeyou're in this. For me, right, because back that one, it softensit up a little bit and to it makes it. It often makesit easier for you to ask tougher questions that are in your head, thatyou know you got to get answers or now you're just thrown up a haleand you know, a prayer and a Hail Mary Path. Sure, sure, I well. And you know the other question. I know that weget a lot from reps. you mentioned the negative consequences. Yep, whendo you know that you've done enough discovery and you can kind of pivot thethe conversation to sharing more about your solution? How do you do that's a greatquestion because, you know, traditionally a lot of people have been taughthey, you know, get to the problem and then start selling, whichmeans pivot to yourself, and you know that. I know that. Youknow this. We believe in a couple of things. One is the firstway is to pivot to yourself without talking about yourself, and what I meanby that is if I've got a set of issues of consequence for the customerthat we can attach to and we think we can help solve, before Istart overtly talking about my products and services, I instead help the customer think throughwhat's possible if they effectively deal with what we're talking about, if youeffectively solve those issues in those problems. What does life look like on theother side? And I probably because I probably have a lot more expertigues inthe space than the customer does, I probably have a point of view thatthey don't have. So what I'm really trying to do is help them thinkthrough what's possible by sharing stories of what other customers have achieved, what we'veseen other people be able to do to resolve the issues. And by doingthat I'm talking about myself without talking about myself right. What I'm sharing isthese experiences that we have, these outcomes we've helped other people achieved, butI'm not sharing with with them the and...

...we did it in the following way, with the following capabilities and technology and services, etc. It's just,Hey, I've had other couple other clients that look just like you in termsof the issues that they're struggling with. We were able to get your counterpartplus the following through other people in a room and as we work through that, these are the outcome they were able to drive to. So now whatI started to do is I've actually started to pivot to a conversation about myself, but it's still focused on who you are. And what you're trying toachieve. Because, remember, what we're trying to do. We're trying toget to a point where the list of requirements is so well thought out thatwhen I do open my mouth specifically about my products and services, everything thatcomes out of my mouth really lands because it's all around solving for the outcomes. So it's almost like a Texas two step. Right, I have thisgreat conversation about you and I start to pivot about me, but it's reallystill all about you, right if because it's about the outcomes you can driveand the things that you can achieve and and and the impacts I can haveon the business before even start to talk about how we enable that very specifically. So that's how I would suggest. It is almost like do the softmove first and then make sure the requirements are laid out and fully vetted sothat when you do open your mouths very specifically about yourself, it clearly canattach back to the outcomes trying to drive to by resolving the issues. Andit was back to understanding the proof points in your organisation. Since we havea podcast we just published on proof points, I encourage everybody to check that outand one of the things we talked about there. I mean it's onething to know the mattrigs and measurable results, but especially in these conversations, youneed to know this story. Yeah, behind at which can help showing thatDelta that you were just talking about. Well, it's another great example ofgreat discovery. Right, everybody, and I do this one. I'min a room with a group of people, you know, I'll say a anorganization of twenty or two hundred or whatever the number is. Hey,what's the big story here? Right, and somebody, always somebody ours,raises our hand and they throw out the...

...name of a fortune five hundred companyand they'll say, oh, it's, you know, Walmart or chase bankor whatever. You know, it's some big company where they did where,they did business and got a big win. So I say, what's the story? And then I get little bits and pieces from different people. Right, somebody can give me one sentence, somebody else gives you a little bitmore, and before you know what, I'm getting different information. That doesn'tdrive and I finally stop and say here's what I want. I want oneperson in this room to give me the business problem. We help the customersthink through the solution that we enabled for them and the business result that theywere able to get. And about fifty percent of the time somebody in theroom can do that for me really, really fluently or eloquently. And thenI asked a question. I say, how many people have actually told thatstory to a customer? Just be honest, how many of you have referenced thataccount, that win to another potential customer, you know? And Sixty, seventy, eighty percent of the hands go out. And then I sayokay, now, keep your hand up if you actually helped create that story. Every hand goes down except for one or two. And the point I'mtrying to make is if you're going to tell somebody else the story, youbetter know it cold. Number One, but number but number two. Thebest stories are the ones that you create, and the goodness is you only needtwo or three in your hip pocket. If you have two or three greatstories in your hip pocket that apply to the market place that you callon, you can typically spend those a couple of different ways as appropriate toget your point across. But that's another example of great discovery. Right,as you said, for all the ways the beginning. Great discovery is aboutyour ability to hold a conversation, and a conversation is not question answer,question answer, question answer. So I'm really glad to brought that up andI hope that that kind of went where you wanted it, of course.Yes, where do you think? I mean, Brian, you teach thisa lot. Where do you think wrap some particular where do they go wrongmost? Let's discover. That's a great question, I think. Number One, we have a tendency to think we...

...have to talk about ourselves a lot. We think that because a customers taken time and the first thing that oftencomes out of a customer's potential customers mouth is hey, tell me about yourstuff or tell me about your company, or hey, we think we needsomething and we did some research and looks like your company has that kind.I see a demo like there's that opening salvo from a customer that says talkabout yourself, you're and so we think, oh, we better talk about ourselves. And sure, go ahead and talk about yourself, but what Ibelieve you should do is talk about yourself in terms of how it relates tothe client meeting. Well, Hey, we're a twenty year old company.Can't wait to tell you more specifically about who we are, but let memake sure you know that these are the conversations we're having with other customers.This is where we are relevant, right. So let's make sure we're in theright slim lane for you. What's on your mind that would be relevantfor the two of us to be talking about. So I think that's thefirst thing. The second thing is don't jump at the first thing you hearright, meaning don't take that first thing out of a customer's mouth and runto the racist to talk about how you can solve for that. Force themto expand upon it, force them to think about all of the negative consequencesassociated with whatever they're dealing with, not just for themselves or their team ortheir department, for the rest of the business. Show up with a pointof view, really understand how these decisions typically get made, so that youcan listen for things that are missing and say, well, you know,Rachel's funny that you would say that. Totally agree that the following other couplepeople would typically be impacted. But you know, when we're having these conversationsof their otherizations, it's not only person you're chearing those two folks, butwe have found that the person who runs reconciliation and accounting it's impacted by thisor the CFO gets impacted by this. What's your take or what have youheard from them on this topic? So, like, expand on what you're hearing, don't just run to solve it, if that makes sense, because thatreally gets your mind around this thing...

...that everybody at first management knows thatI've been evangelizing on, which is this thing called the collective. Yes,right. And then, last but not least, don't delegate yourself down.We often delegate ourselves down by our lack of preparation or by the questions thatwe ask or by our unwillingness to ask the tough questions. I mean,I said to the CEO I was speaking to the other day, I said, listen, you're at a point right now or where you've made an investment. You've got some executives who are engaged in the investment, you've got anew executive on your team who's questioning that executive that investment, and I askedfor permission to speak freely and he said yes. I said it sounds likethe five or six of you need to get around a table and make adecision on what's right for the business. Now, I had to earn theright to say that. Well, I I've known this person a couple ofyears. I never would have said that to him the first time I methim. But you know, we've earned the right through what we've done forhim and his company, to to say things like that and to be anhonest broker. And Oh, by the way, these people are looking tomaybe do some business with us or somebody else. So this is not aI like you, you like me? Can you know? Can you tellme something new? This is a were going to spend some money kind ofconversation. So don't delegate yourself down. Be Willing in the right way atthe right time. And this Educ I'm the first permit some of this isan educated set of guesses, right based on what you've done and what youknow, etcetera. But don't be afraid to say what needs to be saidin a way that that's appropriate. Yeah, you know, you mentioned that tipabout expanding your conversation and and that's a good way to think about bringingin other people to do more discovery, getting additional points of view which couldfuel the next step. And you've always said, Brian, that we needto own the next steps in the conversation. Don't let the prospect on the nextsteps, you on the next steps,...

...right. Yeah, and that goesback to what I talked about a little bit of go about being preparedright with an objective and agenda and the ask. We have a tendency toknow what we want to ask for and we don't prepare for that ask andso we clumsily ask for it at the end of a meeting and we wonderwhy the client looks at us like a deer in the headlights. Right.Well, we didn't ask for it very well, and to they didn't knowit was coming. You know what good looks like in these engagements if you'vebeen in your role for a period of time or you've been well trained oryou thought through or the meeting, etcetera. You know what the next steps appropriatelyare to really help a client make a great decision. So put thaton the table, and that's why I say put it on the table onthe front end, Rachel, these are objectives for today. Here's the agendaon how we want to get there. As anything changes, we a granton that less since last week. No, okay, good is I mentioned inmy note or in our conversation. If the conversation goes the right waytoday and it's appropriate at the end, the appropriate next step is typically forus to have a technical deep dive with someone in it and at the sametime have an nroi conversation with someone on the business side of this. SoI'm going to be asking for you to sponsor those couple of meetings. It'snot a question at that point. It's just that. So you don't haveto ask for permission, you have to say is that okay? It's likethat's what I'm going to ask for if the meeting goes well. Now you'reready for that. And what's beautiful in my mind about that is it's obviousto everybody at the end of the meeting whether or not that's going to bean appropriate ask. So now I can take control and say, Hey,Rachel, we learned something today. So a couple things in today's meeting thatmake me realize that initial thing I thought we might be asking for today isnot the appropriate next step. I actually think the appropriate next step is forus to do some deeper discovery with the following two people to better understand theprocess or the issues were trying to help solve. How do we get thatset up right? I mean, or Rachel, Here's what I heard today'smeeting. It lines up to specifically with...

...where I thought we might go.I was on since sure we were going to learn, but I think it'spretty obvious at this point that an Roi Conversation with the right folks on theon the business side, and a deeptive technical conversation around whether or not aproof of concepts going to be appropriate and what the success measures for that wouldbe. is they the appropriate to next steps? How do we get thosetwo meetings set up? Because you already know it's going to ask. SoI never so the beauty that is I never have to ask permission to askfor that because I've told you I'm going to do it. Yeah, yeah, so, if there are, this is such a big and media topic. Brian, thank you for all the tips that you've shared to there aroundthe best practices, but with preparation. Be a bottom line you would share? What would be the bottom line? I think I yeah, I thinkI'd share three things. One is prep one. It's preparation, as Idescribed a couple of in a couple of different times in places during the thepodcast. To attach to that would be don't prep alone. So I'm thinkingabout a guy that I worked with for a long time, and Dan wasso polished in front of a customer when it came to discovery, because Dannever let an important discovery conversation happen without really great planning and choreography. Meaningif somebody else was going on the call with Dan or multiply, we're goingon the call of Dan, Dand in care if he was out in frontor a supporting cast member. But Dan did care and was really good atdriving how that conversation was going to go. His sense of understanding of the importanceof great choreography was just so, so, so tremendous and so manypeople learned that skill from from working with him. And I think the lastthing that I would put on the table here in terms of the bottom lineis this concept that discovery never stops right...

...you are you know discovery. Sometimesthere's a sales stage and people's engage from process called discovery and people like,okay, do I discover here? And then I go to the proposal inthis no, no, discovery is happening every step of the way, rightyou all the way up to an including the clothes, and pass the clothes, because we're trying to ensure that we either get the cross cell or theupsell or the renewal. Right, we're always doing discovery. That's that's thecritical thing. You remember. Never stops nor stops great. Thank you somuch for this conversation today, Brian. Thanks, Rachel. I appreciate witha lot of fun as always. Yes, and thank you to all of youfor listening to the audible ready podcast. At force management, we're focused ontransforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programs that buildcompany alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to executethe growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. Theproof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US AT FORCEMANAGEMENTCOM you've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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