The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode 66 · 4 months ago

Netflix’s Last Chance U: A Conversation with Coach John Mosley Jr Part 2

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Don’t miss — part 2 of our conversation with Coach John Mosley Jr, from East Los Angeles College and featured on Netflix’s Last Chance U: Basketball. Coach Mosley shares more insights on coaching a team to success in another energetic episode. If you haven’t listened to part 1, you may want to listen to that episode first!

You can support Coach Mosley and ELAC Student Athletes here:

- Donate to the ELAC Men’s Basketball Program

- https://org.eteamsponsor.com/ETS/supportUs/311056148

- Donate to the ELAC Student Athlete Fun

- https://elacfoundation.com/elac-student-athletes-fund/

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website. 

Once you get somebody to do it and youcan sell them on looking with his went from zero to hero, I got a guy on frompeople that he wore because he locked into that one detail, so you have tohave those stories, so you can share because it's hard to get individuals todream and believe you are listening to the audible, ready,podcast. The show that helps you and your teams sell more faster willfeature sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a salesengine that helps you feel repeatable revenue growth presented by the team offorced management, a leader in PT sales effectiveness. Let's get started hi, it's Rachel with the audible, readysales podcast this week is part two of our conversation with coach, MosleyJunior he's the basketball coach featured on the latest season of theNetlik series. Last chance you John Caplin, spent some time with coach,mostly talking about coaching servant, leadership and the people he's tryingto motivate here's the rest of their conversation. Let's talk a little bitabout fundamentals like in sports and business. The dilemma of the leader is:How do I get the individual focused on what it takes from a fundamentalsperspective to win championships? I mean they talked about coach Wood andyou know, starting with tying your shoes and the way you put your socks on,so you don't get blisters and he ties that to win in championships. When yougo to work every day and you're picking fundamentals, how do you keep the teamfocused on the reason why we're doing these line drills or the reason whywe're shooting a hundred free throws or whatever is because we can seeourselves in the championship? How do you bring the short term and the longterm vision and goals together with the tactics of the day yeah? So I think youhave to have a story book, so I built up a story book, so I've built up thestories that can sell them on in terms of examples, and I think it's nodifferent than when you walk through the door and you do sales or you wouldhave management team. You have to have a story book and you got to put thatstory book, so they can see the examples of the failures and successesof not following through, because if I just tell them to do it a lot of times,then you know I could tell my kids to do something and they're like yeah sure,but if I give them a story of what could or could not happen because ofthat not to threaten you but here's the dream of what happened. I tell a storyabout a young man. We have this. This fundamental call free, throw lierebound right. So when you shoot the ball, you drift to the free, throw linemost guys like to shoot the ball and the polls and they look at themselves.They watch the ball go in well, we have a simple technique when you shoot it,you land and you drift to an area where the ball. If you miss it, we want toassume that you miss. It will go right, so nobody really wanted to there's nota lot of people that want to buy into...

...that right. Like coach, I'm gonna makethis shot. I don't what are you talking about? What does that have to do withbasketball? What does it have to do with dunting or anything? Do I'll tellyou, I had a young man done it phenomenally, nobody recruited them inhigh school. So I'm telling these stories like this. Nobody recruited him he's one of the best shooters right inour league and in the country. He could do nothing else, but really shoot heshot over forty five, five percent, which is a phenomenal percentage. Fortyfive percent makes at the three point range nobody recruited them in highschool. He comes to us this one small skill set that he learned it allowedhim that when he missed his shot he got his his own messes. More often thanother people got the ball. So if he missed it, he got his own rebound. Moreoften, he learned that so well. How about this now his percentages ofsuccess on the court goes up. He shoots it. He makes it forty five percent ofthe time. So what happens? The other fifty five percent? Guess what now headds? Twenty five percent, because there's twenty five more percent ofwhen he misses it. He gets his own reval yeah. Now,there's more production from him. This young man, as you saw a clip- and thisis why I mentioned him on the show. His name is Frank Berts, nobody recruitedhim out of high school. He comes with us and he was all conference playerhe's a good player. He's athletic is about six five Johnny Dawkins he playedfor Duke Right. Johnny Dawkins is that central central Florida, Johnny Dawkinsand his staff said you know what we're just looking for shooting best shooterleft Scelton Service says: Frank. Birds is the best shooter left in the countryfor junior college. So they say you, let's go take a look here. He's atEastlake College nobody's recruiting the best shooter in the country. Letthe reason why Johnny Darkin said. Oh my gosh. I want that kid. He ends upplaying for Central Florida, he's playing against Duke when they had Tacofall and they went like tournament against Duke and they lost body. Ithink Johnny Donkin Son, Mister Tippin the beat Duke they almost beat him inthe sweet. Sixteen Frank Burtis playing and he's on that team and Johnny darkis one of the reason why he says not because he was making all those threesand he was one of the best shooters left in the country, but because he hadnever seen a player, try down his own rebound and now it adds more value andP and more production. So not only is he a good shooter, of course we taughthim all the other stuff he can defend. He can pass. Everybody has those things,but he added value to himself. By getting these details, he added valuethat yeah everybody was a shooter. Everybody can play defense, everybody,but he added value to himself by being...

...able to track down rebounds because helocked into that one little detail that I've been trying to get everybody tolock into so I sell that story and now guess what I sell. That story everybodyand they go watch films of Frank Birds and Howl. Guess what all of theShooting Guards in my program that come here on now guess what now they all trydown? They go free to lot rebound. So I couldn't once you get somebody to do itand you can sell them on look at with this went from zero to hero. I got aguy who went from sebeto hero because he locked into that one detail, so youhave to have those stories, so you can share because it's hard to getindividuals to dream and believe and say and share those stories. Just say:Look is sharing a story of yeah. We share story of CEOS and dreamers, andyou know the guys that Microsoft, the guys here and the guys there, the guyat Google and all that sometimes those dreams get too far. But if we can justtell some of those those short term stories of success, if we could havesome of those, you got to have that story book together and I found that tobe successful to sell them on the little small dreams. Like look. If youjust jump, stop we lost it and we did. We lost a state championship gamebecause of a jump. Stop because he didn't jump, stop pivot turning pastand I was able to sell it. We lost what they called the turn over. The teamscored the bucket and we lost the game and it of course it wasn't because ofthat one play, but right got to be able to tell those stories it but FrankBerts. He got that scholarship and he's continued to play. Everybody said he'snot going to play at central Florida. He played because he still did the samething he shot every year. He shot the ball. Forty five percent, but JohnnyDarkins knew that he was going to be even more productive because he wasgoing to track down offensive rebounds that nobody else could do, because helearned that skill that nobody else thought was important. I love that inour business in our world. We call that a proof point or a testimonial and forme what you're doing as the leader is that you are connecting you're, givingme the purpose in the future. So you're telling me the purpose of this drill,but you're, not stopping there you're telling me the purpose of this skillset will connect you to your future, whatever that future is and the minutewhat we find is the minute someone can see themselves in the future andconnect it to what you're asking them to do. They'll, never forget it.They'll, never forget it and you're telling the story with passion andemotion and some leaders should just like you just need to do it and trytake, because I told you that that's what's going to happen and like the wayyou tell that story suggest a note to our listeners. Man, your stories, youhave to invest in your stories. You got to get people emotionally connected tothe to the tactics that you're asking them to do and connect it to thepurpose of the future, and I love that yeah yeah, but to caring about themyeah. They cut out some of the parts,...

...but I was telling Joe I'm like Joe. Isee you back in the big twelve or the big ten conference Comone, I see youthere and he couldn't see himself there and I said I'll see you there. I said,let me tell you about this person that person hey. Let me tell you and we did.I did get a call from University of Kansas on Joe Hampton he's like forreal coach and I'm like that, and I show him the phone call so we got to,but but that's because you just caring, truly caring a bottom and carry abouttheir dream as well. I often ask this question in a leadership class that wehave, I want you to write down the greatest leader. You've ever had it canbe a parent, it can be a music teacher, it could be, you know peer or what haveyou, and there is a common theme when I ask why. Why did you list that individual as thegreatest leader that you've ever had and one of the themes that comes back,I is often times they took me to a place where I couldn't get to on my own,which was they met? ME, wherever I was that's a common theme and then thistheme is that you're bringing out is, they actually believed in me more thanI believed in myself, yeah and you got to really invest as a leader. So, ifyou're listening out there, this takes effort. Man, there's like yeah, there'sa play book and there's a handbook and there's all that stuff, but theintangible SAR is investing in individuals and helping them get to alevel that they can't get to on themselves by themselves. I want to askyou about this. One thing that I really really liked when, because when I wasthe player rules drove me, nuts, man and compliance and all the you know,boundaries and all that stuff when it wasn't explained well your philosophyof having few rules but being really really specific onthose rules. Could you just give us a little bit about your philosophy? Likemy interpretation? Is I don't burden them with a hundred different rules? Ihave some critical rules that I make sure that they understand so few islike blesses, more yeah. You know it's interesting as I had when I first started as a head coach atthe community college level. I went to Hall of fame coach and I ask them, Isaid Hey, what are you, what are some of the rules? What saying should I putin plays for my program? He said well, first, thing: is you don't want to havemany you need about. You know two or three rules and just stick with thosegas in you did you? Wouldn't probably you got to hold them accountable to allthose rules, and it's like turn off your cell phones. When you, when youwalk in through the door, then it's like. Okay, you got all these rules nowyou got to hold them accountable if someone forgets to turn off the cellphone instead of establishing what our disposition is when we walk through thedoor. That kind of covers everything, so you want to generate these rulesthat can cover almost everything I talk about. I got like three rules. I I'lltalk about effort being competitive and...

I'll talk about being on time, and sowe talk about effort that covers a lot. What's your effort like getting to theclassroom, if I say competitive, how competitive to argue about waiting yourday, so I'm talking about winning our day winning are now so if you need towin the day, you can't win the day. If you don't go in and show up on time,you can't you can't win the day if you're not handling your business inthe classroom and you can't be competitive if you're, not winning inthe classroom. I like to kind of generalize everything under those. Youknow those three rules, but I say hey, you need to show up one time if you're,showing up and if you're being there on time, I think we say to be on time isto be early. You know the Coa Yeah, you know. I said if you're on time thenyou're late in men of your late. You absolutely are in trouble, and so wekind of stick with that and then the principles of being early and I kind ofmake them feel uncomfortable by not kind of getting there early and Ceptin.That as a precedent, is that that's my lifestyle, my lifestyle is being thereearly, but now, if I'm there early, that means I'm ready, I'm preparing andso without saying, okay. In order to come in today, you got to prepare. Yougot to do this this, and this will actually by making the team felluncomfortable about not coming early now, if they're uncomfortable, they allget there early. If you all get their early guess what they're doing somelevel preparation. So now I don't have to add the rule of when you walkthrough the door. You prepare like this this and this because guess what nowthey're there early? What do I do? Okay, now, let me show you what you do. Thisis how you prepare fellows: Hey guys. If you show up early, you shouldprepare, but they walk through the door. I'dgive them the one rule to walk through yeah or early. They have nothing to do but prepare sonow. We've actually accomplished several rules under being early orbeing on time. You know like there's preparation, there's proper, you forceyourself to get proper nutrition so that you have the energy to to perform.Now you get your proper flexibility, you can't just walk on the court andplay because what will happen if you show it right on time, you're notprepared you're, not lathered, you're, not ready to go you're, not in a goodmental health space, a good mental space, your body's not going, and yougot to get going so guess what now we have poor starts, but if we're, ifwe're on time right the one rule of just being on time, I can cover liketen rules because of Alonim, and now I really make you uncomfortable about notcoming fifteen minutes early at one time now, if you're fifteen minutes earlyguess what you're getting your stretching your warming up, you're,getting your mental space there you've gotten your food in your system, you'restretching so your lathered, your body...

...is warm you're ready to go. You gotextra shots up now. You feel like you're ready. You got a urgency andenergy. You got all of your gear on you're ready to go so now, then, whenwe hop on in that minute, everybody's like boo, let's go and now everybody'sready to go, yeah sharp, we're Chris and there's no poor starts. I don'thave to get you starry so just by showing up on time, not only showing upone time, there's a there's, a little rule under the show on a up on timeshowing up on time means you're early and just that one rule alar loan coverslike ter, there's one other part of rules that you said in that series thatripped my face off like I sat with. It then sat on it for about twenty fourhours and really thought about it. You said rules without relationships. Equalrebellion rebellion. Do that rip my face off. Like I thought about myselfas a player, I thought about myself as a coach or leader rules withoutrelationships equals rebellion. Could you talk a little bit about that yeah?If, but I'm, if I can't have a relationship, I mean joy. Hampton's not gonna show upone time if I don't have. If I can't really show him that I care and reallyshow him that look man, this is going to be the best thing for you. These arehabits that you need to build, so you can be successful. He trusts me now sohe's going to show up on time, because a lot of guys will put up a front,especially young men that have been damaged and abused and all that they'llput up or front and what they'll do is they'll show up late to try to gainsome type of detention and say: okay, here's my way of trying to get love. MyWay of trying to get love is by Rebelli. So what I have to do is build this bondin this relationship and say you don't have to rebel for me to get you to loveor to get me to respond. Okay, you don't have to rebel to get people torespond to get negative reinforcement. You want positive reinforcement, let'swork on getting positive versus negative reinforcement. How do we dothat? We build a relationship with them and we do those things that are goingto gain positive reinforcement and a lot of guys they're seeking thatnegative, because they don't have a relationship. They don't have thattrust and that's all they know, that's all they know growing up, and so I tryto build that relationship to let them know like look man. This is not goingto be successful in life, but you getting these negative responses by notshowing up by poor behavior by low performance because a lot of them. It'salmost like barely one percent- that, if you don't that, if you light a firethat they don't perform, they usually perform. You just have to find out whatit is. That's going to get in perform the I had to. Let him know that he I fullyinvested in what you want to do in the future. He wants to be a business man.He wants to do this and that I had to...

...let him know I'm right there with himand I cared I spent hours and hours and hours with him. I could have left himalone and let him do it, but we need hours. We had to get lawyers. We had toget so many people to help him through his mom's finances and all that stuff,and he was like man. I can trust him OI. So guess what will we show up the nextday? I can discipline them now. I can discipline to shine because I justspent hours with him with a lawyer to help him manage his life. Now thatthat's day when I get in front of the whole team, I can say the shine. Yourun those lines and you show up on time and guess what he does. It goes backand forth because I invest at the time I built the relationship up with him sothat he won't rebel against me now, but guess what? If I didn't help him withthat? If I didn't know it that, even though he wants a college scholarship,I say Sho get on that line, he may roll his eyes and say man. I don't give acare, I don't give a flip. You know what I'm saying. Why? Because he's gotso much going on in his life that I did not that I'm not a part of, but I was apart of what's going on that he's like man, I'm a I'm, a destines gonna. Dowhat coach mostly asked me to do so because he is looking out for my bestinterest and I know it. He won't steer me wrong because he just invested histime and what personally I was going through, and he truly showed me that hecared, and so it always goes always goes back to that that clearly, it'sclearly a common theme in your Leadership Style and I'm hoping thatpeople are taking this away. This is more than style, it is content andphilosophy and of investing in others and earning the right to to get them toinvest back in you and your program. The last topic I want to I want tobring up to you, which I thought was it didn't surprise me so when Rachel r VPof digital engagement, when she was interacting, I with you for thisinterview, she came back to me and she said Oh coach mostly was a recruiterlike, and I got well of course he's the recruiter he's a basketball coach,because no no, no, he was a recruiter in business. He was. He was a headhunter and I thought holy smokes. No wonder because for us we tell peopleevery great leader. The best leaders have ever seen are the ones that couldrecruit and bring people to their organizations, and so tell us a littlebit about the advantage that you must have in doing what you do for a livingwith having a background and recruiting from a business perspective. Well, thething about recruiting man is, it's so divert you can so people from so manydifferent areas. Everybody has a gift. We go back to this diamond again rightyeah, everybody has a gift, but it's package differently is under this rockunder that rock and so the biggest thing what I like to do so I used to bea middle man right, so I may head under I'm the Middle Man and when I got twosides of it, you get a business. They...

...want this great individual and then onthe other side. They want this great job, so I'm right in the middle. So howcan I pull this great individual? And how can I pull this individual to thisthis great position? So what I have to do number one is I'm first, I have to pull what are thegifts that you have share with me? Some stories share with me. What success isthat you have share with me. What are some some things that motivate you?What do you like to do? What do you love? What is what are you passionateabout? So what can I pull from the person that I'm recruiting what they'repassionate about? WHAT'S THE CARACT? What do they want and when you see thatand when you see the passion come from and what the successes they they've hadthrough the passion, so I used to recruit some athletes and the athleteswill come and they'll say well yeah. I just got my b a degree, and I did thisand I did that I said well, you know what tell me about your best game. Oh,I scored fifty one points and I was like really what was that situationlike what was that, like man, I was just in a zone and who were you playingagainst all? It was against the number one team really, so you mean to tell meyou're able to perform against the number one team in front of tens ofthousands of people under pressure. You know or about this story, so you meanto tell me that you were able to hit the game winning free, throw. I had ayoung lady who hit the game when he won in the World Series you played for UCla and she was a softball and she hit the game when he run. She came to meall quiet ed was just like yeah, I don't know what I can do and I said:Wait a minute hold up you performed under that pressure. That's what we'reselling here! That's what we're selling we selling you. You had a moment whereyou performed you can perform, and so what I used to try to do is find thosemoments of performance and a lot of young people, don't know that they didperform and we got to sell that. We got to cool that out of them when we'rerecruiting them. So I'm the Middle Guy, I'm pulling out sure. Let's find someperformances and now I'm going to pump I'm going to motivate you and say seeyou are a performer. You can do this, you can you can perform you get it on this stage. This is what you did andit doesn't have to be athletics. It's like what groups were you in? How didhe? Where did you leave lead on your college campus would well yeah. I wasjust a part of this. What do you mean? You were just a part of that. Why didyou do that? Well, I felt glad to do it, so you mean on your own. You decided todo it and you took over that organization on campus would yea let itthere's no big deal. No, that is a big deal. That's a big deal. That's a start!THAT'S A leadership quality! That's a quality that a lot of people don't have,so we try to pull those successes and then, when I go to the other end, youselling those successes and say look.

This is a self starter. This is someonethat has performed and performed on a stage with no monetary. There was nomoney at the end and they performed. So imagine if you attached incentives. Ifyou attach compensation, if you, if you attached, you know a level ofcommission how they will perform they're competitive and how they wereperformed, and so I was kind of in the middle of those, and so I would have topull the stories, pull the successes and then I would have to broadcast andI would have to share and sell and- and we would have to package thosesuccesses, because a lot of I would get a lot of students coming straight outof college or even those who had already been seasoned and been inbusiness and share specifics. I would hove to share specifics. That may be acompany will want to hear I'm telling a hiring managers and yeah. That was loveit. So that was interesting. I would tell you that every single one of ourcompanies that are listening to this everybody's recruiting, if you're, notrecruiting you're dying, so every single one of our companies. Let mejust do a little recap. I want to heard you say: You're, the Middle Man and youtake the responsibility. I don't care if you're a sales leader and you'rerecruiting your responsibility is to sell the companies to qualify thecandidate but also sell the company to the candidate, and you should be if youhave a recruiting department. You should own that you should say that youknow I'm not going to leave it up to my recruiting department, I'm going to bethe person, that's going to not only sell the company, but I'm also going tobe the person to qualify this individual and pull out all the nuggetsand to figure out what that connection is in place. So I really really lovedthat and then the last thing that I'm thinking about that really sums you upcoach Mo is. I want all the leaders to listen to. This is like the data saysthat men and women don't leave companies, they don't quit companies, they quit us.They quit us as leaders and all of these strategies that you've given ustoday is a real kind of acknowledgment of a responsibility of the amount ofeffort it takes to be a leader. Is there anything as we wrap up, and Iwant to talk a little bit about your program and the real reason why Ioriginally called you and is there anything else from a leadershipperspective that we didn't talk about today, that you would have thought wewould have talked about it or anything else? We didn't cover that you want toleave our listeners with it all kind of goes back to just servant leadership,man yeah, we just all of what we've been talking about the books and thingsthat have been most impact. Ul to me that I've read on leadership has beenabout serving and when you serve others man, it solves a lot of problems andthen they want to believe in your dreams and your vision, and they wantto help the people, the leaders that I've had that Takin a vested interestin me. I wanted to just push whatever they were trying to do so, whether it'smy pastor, who said John, let's, let's go and let's just go, eat and I'm like.Why does he want to go eat with me and...

...he just wants to listen to what I wantto do and what my dreams are and what I want, and he just listen to me. Thoseare the people I'm like. Okay, those are the people that I clung to thepeople that I have an impact on my life about my faith, about anything thatI've done is interesting. The people that have listened to me, the peoplethat have genuinely wanted to understand what was going on with meand what I wanted to know what I thought those are the ones I clung to thepeople who celebrated me. You know what I'm saying as leaders we got tocelebrate, we got to say we not look to be celebrated. We have to celebrateothers, the ones who celebrate me. Those are the ones I like. I like thosepeople, you know because that's just human nature, and so, if we celebratein those who are working on there, as said we celebrate nose and we find in awe truly are letting them talk to us and share. What's going on in theirlives. They'll cling to you now want to support whatever vision we have as welland that that's what I found to be true, so legit so legit in in our business.We talk about the most successful companies, the most successful sellers,the most successful leaders they have. This thing called an outside inapproach versus an inside out approach, means I'm going to come to you first tolearn as much as I can about you before. I even attempt to tell you about me andwhy I'm good for you, so that outside in versus inside out approaches iscoach. I got to tell you it's just all over everything that you do and we talkabout consciously competent and unconsciously, competent and you'rejust doing some things that are just so amazing and so awesome for thelisteners. I was so compelled by coach most story. I just wrote him an emailand I just encouraged him. I just said: Hey Dude. I have never. First of all, Iwas so encouraged by the way, a man of faith, just kind of stands up and andhas an audience of one and less. The chips fall. Where they May- and I justso respected that of living a person living out their faith, and I justwrote them to encourage him and then you called me right back, you sent mean email and then we got on the phone and one of the things that I wanted todo by doing this podcast, our listeners are going to get a ton out of this. Ithink they're going to be so tickled that they can have a first handlistening to coach, mostly and in the net flix connection. I just think it'sgoing to be really awesome, but my gift back to you has always been alwayswanted to be. I mean you guys, you don't have a big budget, you havereally like very little budget and so in the show notes what we're going todo and the podcast notes will make sure that we have places in there wherefolks can donate and- and I'm just going to do it for you coach. So youdon't have to say anything about it, but I've been on the phone with yourpeople, so anybody listening to this I've talked to Dr Roman Roman. I'vetalked to the athletic director have...

...talked to the people at theirfoundation. They've set it up. It's completely legit to your donations willgo right to coach Mose's program, folks, his coaches don't even get paid. So Ijust want to kind of put that in perspective for some folks- and youknow, they're not getting all the great shoes and I'm not saying these kids youknow deserve or nothing I'm not talking anything about anything that anybodydeserves or in a isn't titled, but if you're so moved like I was when I watchthis series I will. I would just hope you take the time going to the shownotes and if you're so moved your programs they're accepting donationscoach, you appreciate the donations and and the donations go a long long wayfor your program helps the kids eat. It helps you take those retreats up tothat. You know just for gas money to get these kids from one place to thenext money and we're not talking about extravagant things, but we justappreciate you so much and hopefully you're okay with us kind of pluggingthat, for you. Ah That's hard for me to do man. I really appreciate them.People are they kind of get on me and say John. You need to push it put it on.Your Social Mans is just hard for me to ask for you know we just invest in in as it'shard for me to do. It is just hard, but it really is just as simple as you knownow the kids can get cheese on a cheeseburger. You know right it, it'snot we're not asking for brand new facility or anything. We just needcheese on the cheeseburger. You know extra pares, his kids a been you know,they're wearing socks. Over and over I mean it's really. It could get likethat where I could, instead of giving them two pair of socks, I can maybegive them ten pair of socks for the year. You know it's that, instead ofyou know, staying out a two star, they could stay at a three star when we dowhat our one travel of I can move up. You know that we can stay in the hotelwhere the doors aren't outside they're facing yeah. You know that yeah, whereit's a little more intimate so now that gives us some intimate space just thatlittle bit of difference changes I can remember standing the outside doors andit was like raining and we lost that we stayed the doors are inside, it wasmore intimate. We were like at a holiday and express, and it was like itjust felt we got breakfast in the morning. We didn't have to pay for itwas like on. It feels better. So, just just just that, it's like you, said ourcoaches, they they get a small stipend and but still we gon t still do the workand a little a little goes a long way and the there's many more people. Yes,so let's do this. Let's say this to our listeners. If you got some value out ofthis and go ahead and send me an email if this was a complete waste of yourtime, I'd love to hear it. J Capena Force Management Com. I don't expectthat. I'm going to hear that, though, if you got some value out of this,would you just take a moment check out the links and if it's in your heart, ifyou have the capability, if you have to wear with all we'd, ask you just todonate to the cause, I'm personally doing it again. I love what these folksare doing. It's the reason why we ask...

...them to come on, and so, if it's inyour heart, please check out that check out those links in the show, not socoach, just an absolute honor and a thrill for us to have this time withyou. We love what you're doing we love what you stand for. We'd, woe tell you,God bless you, your family, your e lack family and the men and women that maybe continue to bless the men and women that you lead and and go Husky Stud.Thank you. So much thanks for having me and yeah any time. Man we get together.Yeah love! It go, get em good luck this year, all right! Thank you! So much.Thank you at force, management we're focused on transforming salesorganizations into elite teams, are proven methodologies, deliver programsthat build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth, give yourteams the ability to execute the gross strategy at the point of sale. Ourstrength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's get startedvisit us at force. Management Com. You've been listening to the audible,ready podcast to not miss an episode subscribe to the show in your favoritepodcast player until next time, a.

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