The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode 66 · 8 months ago

Netflix’s Last Chance U: A Conversation with Coach John Mosley Jr Part 2

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Don’t miss — part 2 of our conversation with Coach John Mosley Jr, from East Los Angeles College and featured on Netflix’s Last Chance U: Basketball. Coach Mosley shares more insights on coaching a team to success in another energetic episode. If you haven’t listened to part 1, you may want to listen to that episode first!

You can support Coach Mosley and ELAC Student Athletes here:

- Donate to the ELAC Men’s Basketball Program

- https://org.eteamsponsor.com/ETS/supportUs/311056148

- Donate to the ELAC Student Athlete Fun

- https://elacfoundation.com/elac-student-athletes-fund/

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website. 

Once you get somebody to do itand you can sell them one look at what this went from zero to hero. I got a guy with from people that he will because he walked intothe one detail. So you have to have those stories so you can share, because it's hard to get individuals to dream and believe. You're listening tothe audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sell morefaster. Will feat your sales leader sharing their best insights on how to createa sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the teamat force management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let's get started.Hi, it's Rachel with the audible ready sales podcast. This week is parttwo of our conversation with coach Mosley Junior. He's the basketball coach featured on thelatest season of the Netflix series last chance you. John Kaplan spent sometime with coach Mosley Talking About Coaching, servant leadership and the people he's tryingto motivate. Here's the rest of their conversation. Let's talk a little bitabout fundamentals. Like in sports and business, the Lemma of the leader is howdo I get the individual focused on what it takes from a fundamentals perspectiveto win championships. I mean they talk about coach would and they you know, starting with tie in your shoes and the way you put socks on soyou don't get listers and he ties that to win a championship ships. Whenyou go to work every day and you're picking fundamentals, how do you keepthe team focused on the reason why we're doing these line drills or the reasonwhy we're shooting a hundred free throws or whatever is because we can see ourselvesin the championship? How do you bring the short term and the long termvision and goals together with the tactics of the day? Yeah, so Ithink you have to have a story book. So I built up a story book. So I've built up the stories that can sell them on in termsof examples, and I think it's no different than when you walk through thedoor and you do sales or you would have management team. You have tohave a story book and you got to put that story book so they cansee the examples of the failures and successes of not following through, because ifI just tell them to do it, a lot of times. Then youknow, I could tell my kids to do something and they're like yeah,sure, but if I give them a story of what could or could nothappen because of that? Not to threaten you, but here's the dream ofwhat happened. I tell a story about a young man. We have this, this fundamental call free throw line rebound, right. So when you shoot theball, you drift to the free throw line. Most guys like toshoot the ball and they pose and they look at themselves they watch the ballgo in. Well, we have a simple technique. When you shoot it, you land and you drift to an area where the ball, if youmiss it, we want to assume that you miss it will go right.So nobody really wanted to. There's not...

...a lot of people that want tobuy into that. Right. Like, coach, I'm making a shot.I don't what are you talking about? What does that have to do withbasketball? What does it have to do with dunking or anything do I'll tellyou. I had a young man done it phenomenally. Nobody recruited him inhigh school. So I'm telling these stories like this. Nobody recruited him.He's one of the best shooters right in our league and in the country.He could do nothing else but really shoot. He shot over forty five five percent, which is a phenomenal percentage. Forty five percent makes at the threepoint range. Nobody recruited him in high school. He comes to us thisone small skill set that he learned. It allowed him that when he missedhis shot, he got his his own misses more often than other people gotthe ball. So if he missed it, he got his own rebound more often. He learned that so well. How about this? Now his percentagesof success on the court goes up. He shoots it, he makes itforty five percent of the time. So what happens the other fifty five percent? Guess what? Now he adds twenty five percent because there's twenty five morepercent of when he misses it, he gets his own rebound. Yeah,now there's more production from him. This young man, as you saw aclip, and this is why I mentioned him on the show, his nameis frank burt us. Nobody recruited him out of high school. He comeswith us and he was all conference players, a good player. He's athletics,about six five. Johnny Dawkins. He played for Duke Right Johnny Dawkinsis at Central Central Florida. Johnny Dawkins and his staff said, you knowwhat, we're just looking for a shooter. Best shooter left. Scouting Service saysFrank Burt's is the best shooter left in the country for junior college.So they say you, let's go take a look. Here he's at.He's still a college. Nobody's recruiting him. Best shooter in the country left.The reason why Johnny Dawkins said, Oh my gosh, I want thatkid. He ends up playing for Central Florida. He's playing against Duke.When they had Taco fall and they went means that Lake Tournament against Duke andthey lost by him. I think Johnny Dawkins son missed the TIPPI in thebeat Duke. They almost beat him in the sweet sixteen. Frank Burt's isplaying and he's on that team and Johnny Dawkins one of them. The reasonwhy, he says, not because he was making all those threes and hewas one of the best shooters left in the country, but because he hadnever seen a player track down his own rebound and now it adds more valueand for more production. So not only is he a good shooter. Ofcourse we taught him all the other stuff. He can defend, he can pass, everybody has those things, but he added value to himself by gettingthese details. He added value that all here. Yeah, everybody was ashooter, everybody can play defense, everybody. But he added value to himself bybeing able to track down rebounds because...

...he locked into that one little detailthat I've been trying to get everybody to lock into. So I'll sell thatstory. And now, guess what, I sell that story to everybody andthey go watch films or Frank Bird's and now'll guess what. All of theshooting guards in my program that come here on our guess where? Now theyall tracked down big go freaquent and rebound. So I couldn't once you get somebodyto do it and you can sell them on. Look at what thiswent from zero to hero. I got a guy that went from people tohero because he locked into that one detail. So you have to have those storiesso you can share, because it's hard to get individuals to dream andbelieve and say and share those stories. Just a look. It's sharing thestory of Yeah, we share story of CEO's and dreamers and you know theguys at Microsoft, the guys here and the guys there, the guy atGoogle and all that. Sometimes those dreams get too far. But if wecould just tell some of those, those short term stories of success, ifwe can have some of those, you got to have that story book togetherand I found that to be successful, to sell them on the little smalldreams like look, if you just jump stop. We lost it, andwe did. We lost a state championship game because of a jump stop,because he didn't jump stop, pivot, turn and pass, and I wasable to sell it. We lost it. They called a turnover, the teamscored the bucket and we lost the game and it of course it wasn'tbecause of that one play button right. Got To be able to tell thosestories it. But Frank Burt's he got that scholarship and he's continue to play. Everybody said he's not going to play at central Florida. He played becausehe still did the same thing. He shot every yeah, he shot theball forty five percent, but Johnny Dawkins knew that he was going to beeven more productive because he was going to track down offensive rebounds that nobody elsecould do because he learned that skill that nobody else thought was important. Ilove that. In our business, in our world, we call that aproof point or a testimonial. And for me, what you're doing as theleader is that you are connecting, you're giving me the purpose in the future. So you're telling me the purpose of this drill, but you're not stoppingthere. You're telling me the purpose of this skill set will connect you toyour future, whatever that future is. And the minute, what we findis the minute someone can see themselves in the future and connect it to whatyou're asking them to do, they'll never forget it. They'll never forget it. And you're telling the story with passion and emotion, and some leaders shouldjust like you. Just need to do it and trust me, because Itold you to, that that's what's going to happen. Yeah, and likethe way you tell that story. So just a note to our listeners.Man, your stories, you have to invest in your stories. You gotto get people emotionally connected to the to the tactics that you're asking them todo and connect it to the purpose of the future, and I love that. Yeah, yeah, but to caring...

...about them. Yeah, they cutout some of the parts. But I was telling Joe, I'm like,Joe, I see you back in the big twelve or the big ten conference. Come on, Joe, I see you there, and he couldn't seehimself there and I said I'll see you there. I said, let metell you about this person, that person. Hey, let me tell you,and we did. I did get a call from university Kansas on JoeHampton. He's like, for Real, coach, and I'm like that andI showed him the phone call. So we gotta get but but that's becauseyou just caring, truly caring about him and caring about their dream as well. I often asked this question and a leadership class that we have, Iwant you to write down the greatest leader you've ever had. It can bea parent, it can be a music teacher, it could be, youknow, peer or what have you, and there is a common theme whenI asked why, why did you list that individual as the greatest leader thatyou've ever had? And one of the themes that comes back is, oftentimes, they took me to a place where I couldn't get to on my own, which was they met me wherever I was. That's a common theme andthen this theme is that you're bringing out is they actually believed in me morethan I believed in myself. Yeah, and you got a really invest asa leader. So if you're listening out there, this takes effort, man. There's like yeah, there's a playbook and there's a handbook and there's allthat stuff. For the intangibles are is investing in individuals and helping them getto a level that they can't get to on themselves by themselves. I wantto ask you about this one thing that I really really liked when because whenI was the player, rules drove me nuts, man and compliance and allthe you know, boundaries and all that stuff when it wasn't explained well,your philosophy of having few rules but being really, really specific on those rules. Could you just give us a little bit about your philosophy? Like myinterpretation is I don't burden them with a hundred different rules. I have somecritical rules that I make sure that they understand. So few is it likeless is more? Yeah, you know, it's interesting, as I had awhen I first started as a head coach at the community college level.I went to Hall of fame coach and I asked them. I said Hey, what are you? What are some of the rules? What's saying?Should I put in plays for my program he's at were first things. Youdon't want to have many. You need about, you know, two orthree rules and just stick with those because, and you did, you wouldn't probably. You got to hold them accountable to all those rules. It's liketurn off your cell phones when you when you walk in through the door.Then it's like, okay, you got all these rules. Now you gotto hold them accountable if someone forgets to turn off the cell phone. Insteadof establishing what our disposition is when we walk through the door. That kindof covers everything. So you want to generate these rules that can cover almosteverything. I'll talk about I got like three rules. I'll talk about effort, being competitive, and I talk about...

...being on time. And so wetalked about effort. That covers a lot. What's your effort like getting to theclassroom? If I say competitive, how competitive? To argue about winningyour day? So I'm talking about winning our day, winning are now.So if you need to win the day, you can't win the day if youdon't go in and show up on time. You can't. You can'twin the day if you're not handling your business in the classroom and you can'tbe competitive if you're not winning in the classroom. I like to kind ofgeneralize everything under those, you know, those three rules. But I say, Hey, you need to show up one time. If you're showing upand if you're being there on time, I think we say to be ontime is to be early. You know the cool yeah, yeah, youknow, and said if you're on time, then you're late, and then ifyou're late, you absolutely are in trouble. And so we kind ofstick with that. And then the principles of being early, and I kindof make them feel uncomfortable by not kind of getting there early and seting thatas a precedent and that that's my lifestyle. My lifestyle is being there early.But now if I'm there early, that means I'm ready, I'm preparing, and so, without saying okay, in order to come in today,you got to prepare, you got to do this, this, and thiswill actually by making the team feel uncomfortable about not coming early. Now,if they're uncomfortable, they all get there early. If you all get thereearly, guess what they're doing. Some level preparation. So now I don'thave to add the rule of when you walk through the door, you preparelike this, this and this, because guess what, now they're they're early. What do I do? Okay, now let me show you what youdo. This is how you prepare. FELLAS, Hey, guys, ifyou show up early, you should prepare. But they walk through the door,I'd give him the one rule to walk through yeah, or early.They have nothing to do but prepare. So now we've actually accomplished several rulesunder being early or being on time. You know, like there's preparation,there's proper you force yourself to get proper nutrition so that you have the energyto perform. Now you get your proper flexibility. You can't just walk onthe court and play, because what will happen if you show it right ontime? You're not prepared, you're not laded, you're not ready to go, you're not in a good mental health space, a good mental space,your body's not going and you got to get going. So guess what?Now we have poor starts. But if we're if we're on time right,the one rule of just being on time that can cover like ten rules becauseif you're on time, and now I really make you uncomfortable about not comingfifteen minutes early at one time. Now, if you're fifteen minutes early, guesswhat you're getting. You're stretching, you're warming up, you're getting yourmental space there. You've gotten your food in your system. You're stretching,so your lathered, your body is warm,...

...you're ready to go. You gotextra shots up. Now you feel like you're ready. You got anurgency and energy, you got all your gear on. You're ready to go. So now then, when we hop on in that minute, everybody's like, boom, let's go. And now everybody's ready to go. Yeah,Sharp, we're crisp and there's no poor starts. I don't have to getyou started. So just by showing up on time, not only showing upon time, there's a there's a little rule under the showing it up ontime. Showing up on time means you're early, and just that route.One rule of laurn loan covers like tear's item. There's one other part ofrules that you said in that series that rip my face off, like Isat with it and sat on it for about twenty four hours and really thoughtabout it. You said rules without relationships equals rebellion. Rebellion that rip myface off. Like I thought about myself as a player, I thought aboutmyself as a coach or leader. Rules without relationships equals rebellion. Could youtalk a little bit about that? Yeah, if I, but I'm if II can't have a relationship, I mean Joe Hampton is not going toshow up one time if I don't have if I can't really show him thatI care and really show him that look, man, this is going to bethe best thing for you. These are habits that you need to buildso you can be successful. He trust me now. So he's going toshow up on time, because a lot of guys will put up a front, especially young men that have been damaged and abused and all that. They'llput up front and what they'll do is they'll show up late to try togain some type of atension and say, okay, here's my way of tryingto get love. My Way of trying to get love is by rebelling.So what I have to do is build this bond in this relationship and sayyou don't have to rebel for me to get you to love or to getneed to respond. Okay, you don't have to rebel to get people torespond, to get negative reinforcement. You want positive reinforcement. Let's work ongetting positive versus negative reinforcement. How do we do that? We build arelationship with him and we do those things that are going to gain positive reinforcement. And a lot of guys they're seeking that negative because they don't have arelationship, they don't have that trust and that's all they know, that's allthey know growing up, and so I try to build that relationship to lethim know, like look, man, this is not going to be successfulin life by you getting these negative responses, by not showing up, by poorbehavior, by low performance, because a lot of them, it's almostlike barely one percent, that if you don't that, if you light afire, that they don't perform, they usually perform. You just have tofind out what it is that's going to be perform for the shop was Ihad to let him know that, Hey, I fully invested in what you wantto do in the future. He wants to be a businessman, hewants to do this, and that I had to let him know I'm rightthere with him and I cared. I...

...spend hours and hours and hours withhim. I could have left him alone and let him do it, butwe need hours. We had to get lawyers, we had to get somany people to help him through his mom's finances and all that stuff, andhe was like, man, I can trust Mosley. So guess what,when we show up the next day, I can discipline him. Now Ican discipline to Shan because I just spent hours with him with a lawyer tohelp him manage his life. Now, the next day, when I getin front of the whole team, I can say to shun you run thoselines and you show up on time. And guess what he does. Itgoes back and forth because I invest at the time. I built a relationshipup with him so that he won't rebel against me now. But guess what, if I didn't help them with that, if I didn't know any of that, even though he wants to college scholarship, I say Shaw, geton that line, he may roll his eyes and say, man, Idon't give a care, I don't give a flip. You know what I'msaying? Why? Because he's got so much going on in his life.That I did, not that I'm not a part of, but I wasa part of what's going on that he's like, man, I'm a I'mhaving destinies, I'm gonna do what coach Mosley asked me to do, sobecause he is looking out for my best interests and I know it. Hewon't steer me wrong because he just invested his time and what, personally,I was going one through and he truly showed me that he cared. Andso it always goes, always goes back to that. That's clearly it's clearlya common theme in your Leadership Style and I'm hoping that people are taking thisaway. This is more than style. It is content and philosophy and ofinvesting in others and earning the right to to get them to invest back inyou and your program the last topic I want to I want to bring upto you, which I thought was it didn't surprise me. So when Rachel, our VP of digital engagement, when she was interacting with you for thisinterview, she came back to me and she said, Oh, coach mostlywas a recruiter like and I've loved of course he's are recruiter, he's abasketball coach goes. No, no, he was a recruiter in business.He was a he was a headhunter, and I thought, holy smokes,no wonder, because for us, we tell people, every great leader,the best leaders I've ever seen, are the ones that could recruit and bringpeople to their organizations. And so tell us a little bit about the advantagethat you must have in doing what you do for a living with having abackground and recruiting from a business perspective. Well, the thing about recruiting,man, is it's so direct. You get so people from so many differentareas. Everybody has a gift. We go back to this diamond again,right, yeah, everybody has a gift, but his package differently, is underthis rock, under that rock. And so the biggest thing would Ilike to do? So I used to be a middleman, right, soI mean an her I'm the middleman, and when I got two sides ofit, you get a business, they...

...want this great individual and then onthe other side they want this great job. So I'm right in the middle.So how can I pull this great individual and how can I pull thisindividual to this this great position? So what I have to do? Numberone is I'm first I have to pull. What are the gifts that you have? Share with me some stories. Share with me what successes that youhave. Share with me. What are some some things that motivate you.What do you like to do? What do you love? What is whatare you passionate about? So what can I pull from the person that I'mrecruiting, what they're passionate about? What's the carrot? What do they want? And when you see that and when you see the passion come from andwhat the successes they had, they've had through the passion. So I usedto recruit some athletes and athletes so come and they'll say, well, yeah, I just got my bea degree and I did this and I did that. Was a you know what? Tell me about your best game. Oh, score fifty one points, and I was like really, what was thatsituation like? What was that light? Man, I was just in azone. And who are you playing against? All, it was against the numberone team. Really, so you mean to tell me you're able toperform against the number one team in front of tens of thousands of people underpressure? You know or about this story? So you mean to tell me thatyou were able to hit the game winning free throw. I had ayoung lady who hit the game winning run in the world series. You playfor Ucla and she uses softball and she hit the game when he run shecame to me all quiet. It was just like yeah, I don't knowwhat I can do, and I see, wait a minute, hold up,you performed under that pressure. That's what we're selling here. That's whatwe're selling. We selling you you had a moment where you performed. Youcan perform, and so what what I used to try to do is findthose moments of performance, and a lot of young people don't know that theydid perform, and we got to sell that. We we gotta pull thatout of them when we're recruiting them. So I'm in the Middle Guy.I'm pulling out share. Let's find some performances, and now I'm going topump I'm going to motivate you and say, see, you are a performer,you can do this, you can you can perform. You did iton this stage. This is what you did then. It doesn't have tobe athletics. It's like, what groups were you in? How did youwhere did you leave lead on your college campus? Would well, yeah,I was just a part of this. What do you mean? You werejust a part of that? Why did you do that? Well, Ifelt led to do it. So you mean on your own, you decidedto do it and you took over that organization on campus. Well, yeah, I let it. It's no big deal. No, that is abig deal. That's a big deal. That's a start. That's a leadershipquality. That's a quality that a lot of people don't have. So wetry to pull those successes and then when I go to the other end,you selling those successes and say look, this is a self starter, thisis someone that has performed and performed on...

...a stage with no monetary there wasno money at the end, and they perform. So imagine if you attachedincentives, if you attached compensation, if you if you attached, you know, a level of commission, how they would perform their competitive and how theywere performed. And so I was kind of in the middle of those andso I would have to pull the stories, pull the successes, and then Iwould have to broadcast and I would have to share and sal and andwe would have to package those successes because a lot of I would get alot of students coming straight out of college or even those who had already beenseasoned and been in business and share specifics. I would have to share specifics thatmaybe a company want to hear. I'm telling of it hiring managers,and yet I was love it. So that was interesting and I I wouldtell you that every single one of our companies that are listening to this,everybody's recruiting. If you're not recruiting, you're dying. So every single oneof our companies. Let me just do a little recap. I want Iheard you say you're the middleman and you take the responsibility. I don't careif you're a sales leader and you're recruiting. Your responsibility is to sell the companies, to qualify the candidate, but also sell the company to the candidate, and you should be if you have a recruiting department, you should ownthat, you should say that. You know, I'm not going to leaveit up to my recruiting department. I'm going to be the person that's goingto not only sell the company, but I'm also going to be the personto qualify this individual and pull out all the nuggets and to figure out whatthat connection is in place. So I really really loved that. And thenthe last thing that I'm thinking about there really sums you up, coach Mois. I want all the leaders to listen to this. Is like thedata says that men and women don't leave companies. They don't quit companies,they quit us, they quit us as leaders, and all of these strategiesthat you've given us today is a real kind of acknowledgement of a responsibility,of the amount of effort it takes to be a leader. Is there anythingas we wrap up, and I want to talk a little bit about yourprogramming, the real reason why I originally called you, and is there anythingelse from a leadership perspective that we didn't talk about today that you would havethought we would have talked about? It? There anything else we didn't cover thatyou want to leave our listeners with? It all kind of goes back tojust servant leadership, man. Yeah, we just all what we've been talkingabout. The books and things that have been most impactful to me thatI've read on leadership has been about serving and when you serve others, man, it solves a lot of problems and then they want to believe in yourdreams and your vision. And they want to help. The people, theleaders that I've had that taken a vested interest in me, I wanted tojust push whatever they were trying to do. So, whether it's my pastor whosaid, John, let's let's go and let's just go eat, andI'm like, why does he want to...

...go eat with me? And hejust wants to listen to what I want to do and what my dreams areand what I want and he just listen to me. Those are the people, I'm like, okay, those are the people that are clung to,the people that I have an impact on my life, about my faith,about anything that I've done is interesting. The people that have listened to me, the people that have genuinely wanted to understand what was going on with meand what it wanted to know what I thought, those are the ones thatclung to. The people who celebrated me. You know what I'm saying? Asleaders, we got to celebrate, we gotta say we not look tobe celebrated, we have to celebrate others. The ones who celebrating me, thoseare ones I like. I like those people, you know, becausethat's just human nature. And so if we celebrating those who are are workingunder as if we celebrate nose and we finding a truly are letting them talkto us and share what's going on in their lives, they'll cling to you, no want to support whatever vision we have as well, and that that'swhat I found to be true. So legit, so legit, in inour business we talk about the most successful companies, the most successful sellers,the most successful leaders. They have this thing called an outside in approach versusan inside out approach, means I'm going to come to you first to learnas much as I can about you before I even attempt to tell you aboutme and why I'm good for you. And so that outside in versus insideout approaches is coach. I got to tell you, it's just all overeverything that you do. And we talked about consciously competent and unconsciously competent,and and you just doing some things that are just so amazing and so awesomefor the listeners. I was so compelled by coach most story I just wrotethem an email and I just encouraged him. I just said, Hey, dude, I have never first of all, I was so encouraged by the waya man of faith just kind of stands up and and has an audienceof one and and less two. Chips fall where they may, and Ijust so respected that of living a person living out their faith, and Ijust wrote them to encourage them and then you called me right by you sentme an email and then we got on the phone and one of the thingsthat I wanted to do by doing this podcast, our listeners are going toget a ton out of this. I think they're going to be so tickledthat they can have a firsthand listening to coach Mosley and and the netflix connection. I just think it's going to be really awesome. But my gift backto you has always been, always wanted to be. I mean, youguys, you don't have a big budget, yet really like very little budget,and so in the show notes, what we're going to do and thepodcast notes, will make sure that we have places in there where folks candonate and and I'm just going to do it for your coach, so youdon't have to say anything about it, but I've been on the phone withyour people. So anybody listening to this, I've talked to Dr Roman Raman,I've talked to the athletic director. I talked to the people at theirfoundation. They've set it up. It's...

...completely legit to your donations will goright to coach Mosley's program. Folks, his coaches don't even get paid.So I just want to kind of put that in perspective for some folks,and you know they're not getting all the great shoes. And I'm not sayingthese kids, you know, deserve or not that I'm not talking anything aboutanything at anybody deserves or and it is entitled. But if you're so movedlike I was when I watch this series, I will. I would just hopeyou take the time going to the show notes and if you're so moved, your programs. They they're accepting donations. Coach, you appreciate the donations andand the donations go a long long way for your program and helps thekids eat, it helps you take those retreats up to that, you know, just for gas money to get these kids from one place to the next. Money, and we're not talking about extrapping it things, but we justappreciate you so much and hopefully you're okay with us kind of plugging that foryou. That's hard for me to do. Man, I really appreciate the peopleare they kind of get on me and say, John, you needto push it, put it on your social menuses. Is Hard for meto ask for, you know it. We just investing him in kids.It is hard for me to do it. It just hard. But it reallyis just as simple. As you know. Now the kids can getcheese on the cheeseburger. You know right, it's not we're not asking for brandnew facility or anything. We just need cheese on the cheeseburger. Youknow, extra pairs this kids. Indeed, you know, they're wearing socks overand over. I mean it's really it could get like that where Icould, instead of giving them two pair of socks, I can maybe givethem ten pair of socks for the year. You know, it's that instead of, you know, stand out of to star, they could stay ata three star. When we do want are one travel of I can moveup. You know the we can stay in the hotel where the doors aren'toutside, they're facing yeah, you know that. Yeah, where it's alittle more intimate. So now that gives us some intimate space. Just thatlittle bit of difference changes. I can remember standing in the the outside doorsand it was like raining and we lost that. We stay the doors areinside. It was more intimate. We're like at a holiday and express andit was like it just felt we got breakfast in the morning. We didn'thave to pay for it. was like odd, it feels better. Sojust just just that. It's like you said, our coaches, they geta small stipeen and and but still we going to still do the work anda little, a little goes a long way, and there's there's many morepeople. Yeah, so let's do this. Let's say this to our listeners.If you got some value out of this, and go ahead and sendme an email if this was a complete waste your time, I'd love tohear it. Jake Kaplan and forest management, that Coom. I don't expect thatI'm going to hear that, though. If you got some value of this, would you just take a moment check out the links and if it'sin your heart, if you have the capability, if you have to wherewith all, we'd ask you just to donate to the cause. I'm personallydoing it again. I love what these folks are doing. It's the reasonwhy we ask them to come on and...

...and so, if it's in yourheart, please check out that. Check out those links in the show note. So, coach, just an absolute honor and a thrill for us tohave this time with you. We love what you're doing, we love whatyou stand for. We'd we tell you God bless you, your family,your ELAC family, and the men and women that maybe they continue to blessthe men and women that you lead. and Go huskies to thank you somuch, thanks for having me and yeah, any time man we get together.Yeah, love it. Go get them. Good luck this year,all right. Thank you so much. Thank you. Of Force management.We're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programsthat build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the abilityto execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is ourexperience. The proof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US atforce MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To notmiss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Untilnext time,.

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