The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 10 months ago

After the SKO

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The time period after your sales kickoff is a pivotal one. You spend countless hours planning and executing the SKO, but what’s the plan to maintain that momentum that’s created? What can you focus on as it relates to your day-to-day activities? Force Management Facilitator Antonella O’Day joins us to share the actions sales leaders, managers and reps need to commit to immediately following the SKO and how to build a successful long-term execution plan.

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As a leader. We can't approach some of these initiatives with a one size fits all approach. So can we meet our people where they are? Can we collaborate on a plan? Can we hold each other accountable to it? You're listening to the audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sell more faster. will feature sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team afforce management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let's get started. Hello and welcome to the audible ready sales podcast. I'm Rachel Clap Miller. Today we are going to be talking about what we need to be doing after the sales kickoff, the S Ko, and there's often so much focus on the planning of the Sko, especially from a leadership level and as reps and managers were focused, like land is getting ourselves there in the event it's itself, but we also have to have a game plan ourselves coming out of the SKO. So facilitator, Antonello a day joins me today. Hi, Antonella. That post s Ko period is really a pivotal time. Hi Rachel hopeball as well. So, yeah, it is such a pivotal time. You spend so much, all this time prior to planning the Sko, then you spend all this time to execute on the S Ko and when you're there you're providing, you know, the participants with strategic vission, you're providing them with direction, you're providing them with plans of action, goals, outcomes that the organization is striving for, and you really ultimately lay the seeds during that time frame, during the Sko. But if you really want to see those seeds grow, you and if you're really truly committed to achieving those organizational outcomes, the real work, the bulk of the heavy lifting, actually happens after the sko. Yeah, it's the planting of the seeds we have. We...

...need to water them. This is such a such a big topic, but I know that we'll be able to provide some actionable steps in this conversation. So let's start with those people that are listening right now who are managers. You've gone through the the S Koh, what are my action steps now as a manager? Immediately fouling, there's really so many directions you can take. This I'm going to try to keep it really tight and concise so that our listeners can have some big takeaways. I'll narrow down the four things. The first one is put a plan in place to reinforce those key initiatives from the S Ko. And the reality is is that if, if you're really planning to execute well, the planning on that has to happen before the esk out itself. You know, how how is this all going to fit into weekly meetings? Are you going to do some role plays? Are you going to have quarterly meetings that kind of read visit those initiatives? What are you going to do to game of fi reward people that execute really well on the key initiatives? If there's anything that I learned from my many years of you know, in leadership, if you put heat and light on certain initiatives, your team will put heat and light on it. If you don't, they won't either. The second thing I would say is communicate expectations, give your people the why and get a pulse check early and often. So we leave these things we're all excited, but are we walking away really focused on the right thing? So are we? So, what are we doing to make sure that everybody knows what their role is going to be on execution. Why should people care? Why should our team members care about what those initiatives are, what's specifically in it for them? And I always like during and especially afterwards, just to get the pulse of, you know, the team. What did you think? What's your takeaways? You know what concerns you, and then make sure that you know I'm constantly checking back in and giving them the...

...why. Because, listen, any new initiatives that may be rolling out for any organization has us ups and downs. So you need to consistently bring it back to what's it at for them in order to keep people engaged. I would say the third one is spending time one on one with each individual team member to come up with a specific plan to achieve their desired outcomes. Everybody is different. As a leader, we can't approach some of these initiatives with a one size fits all approach. So can we meet our people where they are? Can we collaborate on a plan? Can we hold each other accountable to it? So spending that time one on one making sure that everybody is rowing in the same direction as key. And then one of my favorite things is make sure that we continue to reward the right behavior and wins and reward them as often as we possibly can. Yet you know, there's as you're talking, and that last point, I think transitions nicely to this point, is going to make of when you're rewarding wins. It doesn't have to be this like giant thing. Right, every success doesn't have to be rewarded with presidents, come trip. Right, it's about highlighting those things maybe on the team call. Hey, I want to talk about Xyz. You did a really good job implementing this new way of doing things or this new questioning track that we've been talking about, or when we talk about what is your plan to reinforce the Escao? Your first point. It doesn't always have to be this giant thing. It can be like talking about it in your Monday morning meeting or sending out an email after the event saying here's the three things I want you to work on this week. It's often those little things that add up to provide great value for your teams. Absolutely, and you brought up a really good point about the rewarding into your point, like it doesn't have to be this big to do you know some of the things that I think...

...we can leverage it really cost us nothing, is obviously recognizing those people in front of their peers and larger groups, really sending a message to maybe your boss or your boss has boss, recognizing that individual and just letting them know that you're putting them front and Center based on some outcomes that they achieve. And the last one, it was one of my favorites that I know it's very old school. I used to have a stack of thank you notes and I used to do a personalized handwritten note to those individuals. I just thought it was a nice touch. It was always very much so appreciated and it really doesn't cost you anything to do. Yeah, it's old school, but nobody gets them anymore, so it's a really greatly differentiate. Exactly right. So I want to just reiterate those four that you talked about before I move on. Antona, you know, have a plan to reinforce after the ESK. I think about it even before the event. The event starts and if you've already had your event, when you're listening to this, pull it together right now, right communicate expectations. You can't do that enough. People need to hear things repeatedly before it's sinks in. Spend one on one time with individuals. They don't all learn the same and continue to celebrate those winds, as we were just talking out. I mean, these four things are great takeaways for those of you listening on and these podcasts, and they're also just the basic stuff. I mean, if you're not doing this, you're really not doing your job as manager. I agree wholeheartedly so, and those are great immediate, immediate steps after the escale. Mean you can do that the next day you get you get back. What are your guidelines for the more longer term, the sixty days and ninety days out, a couple quarters out? You know this similar to the last one. There's a lot of different ways you can approach this. Some of the my favorite things to focus on, and that in those time frames, is what are you doing to measure against your metrics, like what are you doing thirty days, sixty days to just make sure that you are hitting your team's goals and if not, you...

...know what are some of the adjustments that you can make at that point in time? I think if we don't spend the time truly like taking a close look at that, we potentially miss some opportunities. They're the other thing I really like to do is evaluate my team as it relates to those specific initiatives, you know, and and that's sometimes hard because we're evaluating them on so many different things. But I think to just stop, look at things objectively and address any issues you see as early as possible so that you have the capability of changing it and getting everybody on the right track. One of the things I used to like to do. I used to like to do like a mini, you knows, Ko, like a half day, a few hours, hundred and eighty days in. It was an opportunity to really like reassess where we are, get everybody's feedback and make adjustments as needed. Training and reinforcement. Like, if you expect your people to train themselves after the S Ko, you're probably not doing it right. Like we all know that over time to you know, what they take away deteriorates just life passes by and their jobs, you know, get in the way and they can't remember and get, you know, get everything organized in in order. So it's really, you know, our job to make sure that we add those additional codes of paint to reinforce some of those initiatives, some those concepts and whether it's once a month, every six weeks, there has to be some sort of structure in place and it doesn't mean that you, as a leader, have to be the one running these and planning these out. Like leverage team members, external voices, to train and reinforce concept use people who are really excelling in the initiative to come in and talk to the team, because I think, you know, very often they'll pay, you know, more attention to peers sometimes that are going through what they're going through versus leadership. So leveraging that. And the last thing I would say is, you know, one of the beauties of the sko is the camaraderie. Right you get all...

...these people, they come together, they're all excited, they're so happy to see each other and you feel like the sense of team. How do you replicate that after the es Ko, because I think if you can replicate that level of camaraderie after the Sko is done, it'll really help you rally the team around some of these key initiatives. Those are great points and I love the idea of kind of doing that mini check and point a hundred and eighty days out. There's no reason why you can't put that on your calendar now, even if you don't know how you're going to do it or what you're going to do or who's going to be doing. Well, at least it's marks on everybody's calendar and you kind of put that stake in the ground. Okay, so that's manager some good takeaways. Hopefully, those of you listening I can write some of those things down, put it on a post and note on your computer. Let's shift now to a wrap. I'm going to my s Ko, or I'm sitting through it virtually, however it's being executed this year. What am I listening for in those sessions? That's really going to fuel my actions after the fact. So obviously there's usually a lot of information that I get shared during these as Kos. So you know, as a rep, if I'm sitting there, the first thing I'm wondering is what a why need to focus on? What are the key takeaways I have to leave this session with that's going to impact the way I operate, the way I do my role? And then, once you determine what those are, you know what's your why? Like? Why should you consider implementing those initiatives, like what could it potentially do for you, know, you personally, your team? What's going to keep you focused on those items as the year goes by? And then I I would say third, how am I going to execute? Like I think the Esko itself is a great time to start thinking about your strategy for implementation. I get's all great to say, Hey, oh, yes, I'm going to I'm totally on board, but how...

...are you going to actually execute? Like, start thinking about it them, because you know your managers asked you about it. So have a game plan going in, and I think the Eskao itself is a great opportunity to, you know, use your peers as a sounding board and pressure test some of your ideas for execution. And then the last thing, and I know a lot of sellers don't like doing this, but I think you know it's such a critical piece of the possible. The puzzle is, whose help do I need to ensure success? Like do I need my manager's assistance here because I'm not getting certain aspects of it? Do I need some help from peers? Do I need some help from marketing? Do I need some help from product like who are the people that are going to help me win and ask for the help. So those are the four things I would focus on if I were rep yeah, you're asking yourse. It needs to be setting your earpe for success and we always talk about owning that right, own your plan, own how you're going to achieve it, in really participating the ASCO by thinking little selfishly, like what's in it for you? And how am I going to hold myself accountable to achieving what I want to achieve throughout the year? Yeah, absolutely, and I think you know as sellers and sometimes it's hard because as sellers we are very focused on ourselves, you know, and what we're trying to accomplish, and I think obviously that's first and foremost. How am I going to achieve my goals? But I think it goes beyond that. You know, you have to as a seller, you're part of a bigger team. How do I help my team get to where they need to get to and how do I help my organization get to where they need to get to? So how does it all roll up and, you know, work together so that we all achieve the outcomes that we want to achieve? I love that point. You also made into now about figuring out who you need help from. I was just having a conversation internally with one of our sellers and she was saying how she said she's just feels like she's really excelling at pulling in the people at the right times and our sales conversations. I mean we don't have to like fake it here. If you don't know,...

...ask for help. There's people in your organization that have been doing this probably a lot longer than you have. They've tried stuff that has worked and the ask Ko can be a great forum for you to really learn from what's working for others and get the help that you need to achieve what you want to achieve. Yeah, and I think most organizations welcome that. You know, you want to make sure that your people succeed and if you don't throw your hand up and say I could use some help here, they don't know. It's really hard for them to know that you need the help. So as for it, I'm sure there's no issues in terms of providing yeah. Yeah, and we've have a lot of podcast as it relates to the s Ko and content around leadership, leading from the front, around your sales kickoff, even before when the planning and what you're doing in front of your team, and it's also important after the fact and for you to be visible with whatever you are pushing during the eskios. But specifically, what am I doing as a leader to reinforce these concepts that you're talking about with the reps and the managers? Yeah, I agree a hundred percent. I mean the reality is, I think we've all been through enough situations where maybe an initiative gets rolled out, it doesn't even have to be at as Kale, and the manager doesn't really lead from the front on it, and that's a sign. If I'm a seller to say if they don't really care, then I'm good, you know, keeping things exactly the way they are right now, and initiatives then, you know, don't get executed on or that you don't achieve the outcomes that you want. So it's really important from start to finish, that this the sales leader stays in front, is the face of those initiatives, is there to lend support, is there to continue to reinforce the message, is there to communicate, is there to reward, and it's so easy then to get the rest of the team on board and you know, following suit,...

...you know they drop the ball and you know you can't expect, you know, the sales team to just continue to operate all on their own against an initiative. Yeah, and you know we we say it a lot. There's so much investment put in the s Ko and hopes are always so high around and expectations are high, but the real power of all that planning and all that work comes from these little things that are happening after the s as Ko, almost what surrounds the event. And we all have ownership in that. Everyone, you know, we've talked about it today, from the REP level all the way up to leadership. We all have ownership in that. Absolutely. It's kind of crazy when you stop and think about it. The obviously the money, but the time, the effort that goes into the S kl and I'm sure nobody wants a nickel or a minute to go to waste. Right. So if we really ultimately our want the best Roi on the event itself. We as leaders need to plan for what happens after the Sko takes place and a thoughtful game plan, you know, probably will pay dividends. That a lot of us don't even think about. But, more importantly, it allows our team members to achieve great outcomes and you know, as a leader, that's probably one of the most gratifying and satisfying feelings you can have. I love that. I A great conversation. I know, Anton Alla, we could talk about this for two hours, but I'm sure the people listening now are thankful for our short and quick tips that they can take with them today. Thanks so much, Rachel. All right, and thank you to all of you for listening to the audible ready sales podcast. At force management, we're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's get started.

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