The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 3 weeks ago

Differentiate How You Sell

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sales is a game of inches. How you make your approach stand out from the competition (including do-nothing or do-it-internally options) can set you far ahead, or behind. 

There is as much differentiation in how you sell as there is in what you sell. But how exactly do you differentiate your approach? Tune in to hear five key steps you can take to make yourself stand out from the competition and bring value to your buyers. 

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Don't just work your way through ascript approach, your conversations with empathy and understanding and theorders will come you're listening to the audible, ready, podcast. The showthat helps you and your teams sell more faster will feature sales leadersharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps youfeel repeatable revenue growth presented by the team of forcedmanagement, a leader in BB sales effect. In this let's get started hello, I'm Rachel Clapier! Thank youfor listening to the audible, ready, sells podcast. We often talk about howthere is as much differentiation in how you sell as there is and what you sell,and today we're going to talk about what that actually means and key stepsyou can take to differentiate the way you sell John Caplin. This is somethingelite. Sellers really strive to do. Yeah. I love the Little Monica you putthere. The how you sell can oftentimes...

...be just as important as what you selland I'm anxious to discuss that today. Yeah, I think probably I should saythat every one of our podcast episodes will help you differentiate how youself, but we'll wrap it up here in this episode, because we say often that youknow sales is a game of inches and those things you can do todifferentiate yourself in the way you sell is part of that game of inches. So,let's dive in with some ways to different you yourself, the first onewe came up with really has to do with those initial calls in your discovery,approaching those conversations with empathy and understanding. What I likeabout this concept is: is that we're all sales professionals andprofessionals who are committed to understanding customer needs and delivering highlydifferentiated solutions to solve those needs many times we ask ourselves. Sowhy is it that customers don't always see us that way, and and often when ourcustomers are surveyed about sellers?...

They believe that we're out of touchthey ask by ours. What are your two biggest challenges and about the peoplethat sell to you and the surface come back for decades. You know thoseanswers have come back. The exact same way, the number one response is: theydon't understand my business, my pain, my problems and challenges and thenumber two responses they don't listen very well, and sowe've coined the term the cellar deficit, disorder and the best way todifferentiate. How you sell is to be confident in what you do for a livingand put yourself in the shoes of the buyer. Don't just show up begging for ordersor nagging your customers. Your job is to understand your customers bylistening to them and and don't just work your way through a script approach,your conversations with empathy and understanding and the orders will come...

...right. So your discovery isn't justsome question talk track. This is where tyko empathy we're talking aboutunderstanding. It's really guided by the customer, who is sharing key painpoints, and you have to have empathy for that pain, the person's goingthrough. I'm steering that conversation into the pain points that I know I cansolve, and that brings us to the next point how you differentiate fromcompetitors. Yeah, I mean you know. You know why you're different than thecompetition, but the key way to stand out as a seller is to get your customerto care about that differentiation. They need to see the value in thatdifferentiation. You just can't state that something is different and and itbecomes a differentiator. Let me give you a quick example years ago, while Iwas working for pts one of my competitors in a last ditch effort tosave the account got. The engineers...

...focused on our graphical user in herface and in the fact of the matter was, is that our interface was blue and thecompetitors was green and and so they got them totally focused on this andnothing else, and when I finally sat down with the economic buyer, theeconomic fire shared with me that you know he thought that we had a problemand he explained to me you know your graphical unit user in a face is blueand it's not green and and thank God I was just like really focused on thepower of the value of differentiation. In that moment- and I just asked thequestion, can you tell me what challenges that creates for you? What ablue screen verses a green screen creates, and he said no, I can't, andthen I I talked about our differentiation that was alreadysolidified into their required capabilities. Then was something calledby Directional associatively, which men a change made anywhere in the process,was reflectedeverywhere, and that was...

...the number one criteria for them. So sowhat I then did was, then I asked them to stack rank to require capabilities,and- and you can imagine that green screen wound up on the bottom. So youhave to remember your differentiation has to add value to the customer. Sosaying I'm better than the competitor is great, and it's great that youbelieve it. But what differentiates me as a seller is when I can get mycustomer to care about that differentiation and make it part of therequired capabilities, and it focuses on how it relates to outcomes. That'swhat's critical right that that differentiation, how it relates to theoutcomes that move you talked about with theblue screen versus the green screen. It wasn't going to really impact theiroutcomes, and you were listening to that rather than saying what do youcare about the color for, but really positioning it in way in terms of theiroutcomes was how you got the customer...

...to care about it exactly, and I'm soglad you said it that way, because when I first heard it, I'm glad that mybrain, my mouth didn't say what my brain was thinking. I actually kind ofhad, in my mind, like a big fat. So what- and luckily I turned that into so-what does that mean to you? Mister, Miss Customers, stead of just like sowhat blue screen first green screen, so there was some additional learningthere yeah, that's a good good thing for those of you listening out there toremember when your head says. So what when the customer makes some crazycomment ad on, so what does that mean for you? Absolutely why it's so? Whatdoes it mean for you absolutely great things to remember there. The next oneI wanted to bring up is to share continued value in the sales process. Iknow what force management we have some sales people who really execute thisone very well yeah. I think you know you have to make sure you're not onlyreaching out to customers, clients prospects. When you need something youknow you have to have good reasons to...

...engage. You know, maybe your marketingteam put together a piece of thought leadership, and you know that gives youa reason to reach out, or you have a new weapon or to tell them about. Youknow, make sure, there's a reason and look for ways to continually add valuelike conversations with other customers that you've had who have maybe solvedsimilar challenges that they're having research in their industry. A note ofcongratulations, you know, get creative and add value and continue to beinteresting. Don't Nag people and value yeah, then the next one is a keycomponent of our command of the message methodologies. We kind of touched ittouch on earlier. He focused on the positive businessoutcomes and measurable results, you're trying to drive for them with yoursolution. That should be the focus of every sales interaction. Yeah I meanyou, keep them focused on the measurable outcomes that they'relooking to achieve and the required...

...capabilities that will get them there.Your customers are often frazzled and they're too close to the pain to reallyunderstand how to solve it. You have the benefit of helping others solve thesame issues, and you know, keep them focused on the greater story. They'llbe able to better articulate the benefits of your solution and they looklike a hero in their own organization when they do fix challenges and you'llearn trusted advisor status because you help them get there. Yes, Amen. Okay,John. Finally, our final point stay connected yeah. This goes back to theearlier point that we were discussing on. You know state connected, don'tjust reach out when you need something, keep the lines of communication openafter the deal. You never know where that person will end up, and I like toalways think about communication as a process and not an event. For example,you know when I'm communicating with an...

...economic buyer, I think about threephases of communication. I think about kind of like prior to the engagement,where I'm really really focused on discovery. I think about during anengagement when I'm probably more focused on validating that our solutionis a match for the problems and challenges that have been articulatedand then I'm thinking about post engagement, when I'm really kind offocused on proof, points what I call like: Sharing the good news and givingother people the credit. So I like to think about communication as a processnot an event kind of a before during an after mentality, and I've really reallyhad great success on leverage with that yeah. You don't want to underestimatethat after because you never know when that person, where that person is goingto end up. So let me wrap this stuff for everyoneout there listening or five ways to differentiate how you sell a number one.Epithems understanding and discovery...

...differential in a way that has meaningto the buyer continue to share value in the sales process. Keep them focus,keep your byes focused on measurable outcomes and the Final One. I'm summingup. What you said, John by SAT, saying, stay tathered, so there's five thingsfor you all to write on your posted notes on your mirrors today, but loveto wrap it up with a bottom line. John Yeah, that's a great list Rachel! Youknow. The bottom line for me is: is we have to remember that? How we sell canbe just as important as what we sell and all of these ideas today are whatelite sellers do so elite sellers wake up every morning and say to themselveswhat are my differentiators and why are they relevant to my customers and howam I going to get them influenced into the decision criteria? This is aprofessional approach to selling not a series of nagging out reaches. You knowstating things like, and I get these...

...all the time. Hey, John. You must bebusy because you have not responded to the seventh email that I sent to you inthe last two weeks. If you're hit you're experiencing that type ofcommunication with your prospects, you know, there's your sign. You have tobelieve that what you do matters, if you don't who will my drop my crop? Thank you, John. Forthis conversation. You're welcome right. She'll have a great week all right.Thank you and thank you to all of you for listening to the audible, Leddysales, podcast and force management. We're focused on transforming salesorganizations into elite teams are proven methodologies, deliver programsthat build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth, give yourteams the ability to execute the gross strategy at the point of sale. Ourstrength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's get startedvisit us at force. Management Com. You've been listening to the audible,ready podcast to not miss an episode...

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