The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

Lessons From a Sales Veteran w/ Frank Azzolino

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Frank Azzolino, Force Management Senior Partner, has sold for years. He’s been there - done that. He also is a great teacher.

 

He makes his first appearance on the show and talks about how he ensures he has an elite selling motion. His tips will help you make an immediate impact on your critical deals (in all stages of the sales process).

 

He covers it all, making this a must-listen episode for any salesperson or manager out there. Plus, he shares his favorite discovery question, and the one question he wishes he knew 30 years ago. 

 

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

 

Here are some additional resources on building sales skills

 

- How to Test Your Champions [Podcast]

https://apple.co/2BJNul4

- Remember These Phrases. Sell More Deals [Podcast]

https://apple.co/33vC8vG

- Improve Your Active Listening Skills Podcast [Podcast]

https://apple.co/2Vi98D4

I think homework is respect and when we get someone on the phone, we have to do respectful of that time. If there's something we could have learned without asking them directly, we should have learned it. You're listening to the audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sell more faster. Will feat your sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team at force management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let's get started. Hello and welcome to the audible ready podcast. I'm Rachel Club Miller, and today we are going to talk about preparation and execution of a great sales skull. We're joined today by someone WHO's making his first appearance on the PODCAST, our senior partner, frank as Alena, frank, welcome, hello, thank you for putting this together. It's a pleasure to be is great and we're excited decided to have you, and I know our listeners are excited to hear what you have to say, frank, because you've had quite a sales career, executing yourself and leading teams, and now you're here with us at force management, helping some of our biggest clients and our most successful clients. I'd love to hear why you are so passionate about selling. Great Question. I think it goes back to my background. I started my career as an engineer and it was all about understanding problems and solving problems. And I think as a seller, I think if we become as Daniel Pink points out, we become problem finders and I think that's really a great skill to have and working with customers and clients to help them understand the business issues they're facing and in as much as what we do in terms of products and services applies to those problems, you know, offering solutions to help those those customers. I think that stuffs with having real and genuine curiosity and intellectual curiosity of wanting to know more about all the people's businesses are, what makes them work, what makes them not work as well, in learning that, identifying problems that we can actually attach to and in terms of our solutions, but also attacks the emotionally connect the client with those business outcomes that they're looking to achieve. So I'll stop there. Yeah, and you know I was going to follow up I think one of the benefits to that approach, especially when you've been selling a long time, as you have that intellectual curiosity, but then you have that experience. So when you're going into a new client, mean, how many times do you say, Oh, I know another software company that was dealing with the same thing and here's what they did? You have that that curiosity brings you knowledge about a lot of different businesses and organizations. I think you're absolutely right. If it's genuine and if it's if it's kind of contrived just for a stake of US reaching our goals, I think it falls short. But...

...if it's genuine and we actually engage with the customer and learn and understand what they're dealing with, we will absolutely be able to call on our experience in prior history of having seen similar things and and solve similar problems. Yeah, I think there's you can you also know where the land mines are? Right? You can tell people you don't want to do that and I'll tell you why. Well, I absolutely like to tell people that I've made all my mistakes on someone else's nickel. Ok, not bad. They're not. Go read there, but I know you know and you kind of talk about it frank I know you appreciate that art and the science of selling and there are many people who listen to our podcasts who are early in their careers, maybe their first second their job, and who among us isn't looking for better ways to prepare for and execute our sales calls? So let's just go ahead and dive into that Frank I know you have some great wisdom to share in that area. Let's start with the with the basics. Let's just talk through the steps that you take when you're preparing for a first conversation with someone. And maybe I know a lot of conversations. You may know a lot about the person you're talking with, but let's just for the sake of this conversation, let's talk about when you're preparing a first for first conversation with somebody that you don't have much information on. Okay, that's great. I'm going to pull up just a little bit because I think there's some things that we're always doing. We're always doing three things in every conversation, on every call, with every prospect and every customer. We're always discovering, we're always qualifying and we're always negotiating and this kind of falls into that discovery. I need to know as much as I can about that person, company position, their objectives, their goals, and there's a lot of way for us to discover besides asking them directly. You know, it's homework and I think homework is respect and when we get someone on the phone we have to be respectful of their time. If there's something we could have learned without asking them directly, we should have learned it. If it's on their website, if it's on their linkedin profile, if it's public domain somewhere that we should be able to have done our homework and know this, then I think it's fair for our client, our prospect, to expect us to have done that and to know that, so we're not wasting their time. Awesome things that we should already know. But beyond that that is as really a so that's a great way to start. Is What is their linkedin? Let's go look at them. Where are they've been? What have they done? What are the common connections that we have? You know, is there's something that that we have? You know, it's two six separations from Kevin Bacon, if you will. So many people in so many different ways. It could be experientially, it could be personally, but for us to get on a phone call or have a meeting...

...without having done that homework, it puts us at a disadvantage. I think it's disrespectful and we need to be doing more than that. When we do get to a common connection, there's two things we're looking for when we're looking for information. What is the information that this person can give us about someone that we know in common into if their relationship is strong enough, would they give us the introduction? So it's Info and intro the two things we're looking for when we when we when we do a homework with common connections. No, I love that. I love that homework is respect and Info and and intro and I've been on the receiving end of some conversations where I know that maybe they have done their homework, but I can hear that they're just either executing a script or just going down kind of the basic questions that they are always asking and the and the truth is is it sounds like they're just running down their question list. Since that question track is is so important to always be discovering and doing great discovery. How do you prepare for that question flow. Do you prepare questions or, more importantly, are you preparing for to listen? Well, yeah, you you just hit on it. The questions file less important than your ability to actively and intently listen. In early Korea cellars, and I know this because I was one and I did I would be thinking of my second question instead of listening to the answer to my first question. And so many of us do it and it hurts us because we become kind of separated from the moment. We really need to connect with that person and if we listen intently will find out so much more. If it's in person, we're also watching that body language and and the intent behind the answer, and that's so valuable as well. But the idea of intently listening to the to the answer to the question that may bring you to a question that is not your next question as you planned, and you know Clus wits said that no plan survivors engagement with the enemy. Now, prospects on customers are not our enemy, but the plan itself of having a list of questions that we think we're going to ask. It's very unusual for me to actually go through an execute every question on that list. In that order. We, when we do that, where no longer situationally where in contextually correct. So we have to be listening carefully and then go with a conversation wants to go. Go with a customer wants to take you because that's where you're going to find value. We set up our question is anticipating where that might be, but we may not know. Chances out we won't know everything we need to know. So let the customer bring us to where they want us to be and we're guiding them as opposed to dragging them. WHO. I love...

...that guiding rather than dragging, and we've stayed a lot in known command of the message. People have a need to be heard. So if you can hit on what they want to talk about, they'll lead you. They will show you how to sell to them. Believe that. And if you if you're patient, that's the other thing I think. That's probably one of I think patients is one of the most difficult and very important attributes. Are Characteristics of a good seller. You've got to be patient and I to, I truly do believe, with great questions and patients of most people will teach you how to sell to them. That's great. Do you have a favorite opening question or favorite discovery question that you like to use? Frank I do, and I wish I learned it well. Nine years ago I started with with force management and I learned this from John Kaplan and I wish I knew it thirty years ago. It's when you ask that question of tell me what you do. Well, tell me what you're most proud of in terms of your organization, your company, your team, are you individually as a seller? In my case, I sell to sellers in this role. But when you ask that question, they stop to tell you the things they're most proud of, all the the positive things, but then they quit quickly fact, to say yeah, but I need help here. We could really use improvement over here. I wish we could this. And if I went in and ask them directly, what are the things that you're not really good at? What are the things that what are your biggest challenge? Is All the question that I hate, what keeps you up at night? Just terrible questions. You put them on the defensive, they back up, they don't they don't open up for you when you ask one of the things that they love them about, what they do as a company own organization or was a seller. They started telling you that, but then they open up a little and then they start telling you that the area is with his opportunity for improvement and and that's when you can really emotionally connect with them. And I think that's a great it's a great question. It is work for me so often. I'll go back to John Kaplan again. When you learn that, you learn some better than telling them where they're broken. They share with you where they think they broken and then, as John says, people don't argue with their own conclusions. Yeah, and then they'll show you how to sell to them. And part of that letting the customer lead you in the conversation and when you hear, if you're actively listening, you're hearing where you can provide value. And I assume frank that when you do a call you have an idea of what you want the next step to be and you might have to call an audible during the conversation. If you're listening well, what are your best tips for getting to that next conversation, let's say, if you have to get to somebody higher up or another key influencer? How do you close for that? In a conversation, great question and and what I found over the years is that too often sales calls or sales meetings can go awry when you're trying to...

...accomplish too much and it gets a little mannic. Maybe sometimes of selling gets a little nervous. Maybe sometimes they're client prospect gets a little confused. What I do is I have a single I'm a simple guy. I have a single focus. I have this, this ten, twelve things, maybe, if finite number of objectives for any meeting or call. And medic is a great example of how we can determine what those out. What do we know? What don't you know? Although you and you look at it. The things we don't know. What are the steps we need to take to find out those things that we don't yet know. And there's no unknowns and there's unknown on knows. So the still a very finite list of things we go into a call looking to to achieve. I will take that, if it's on a phone call, I'll take that on a little sticky and I'll put that on my laptop and I'll focus on that when I get to that objective and it may be a long circuitutuitous route to get to there. I get to that objective, I'm done. I don't want to complicate things. I want to set a list of next steps. I want to wrap up the call and close on that single objective that I ahead. It could be setting up a meeting with the economic buyer. It could be getting to a Povo, a demo. It could be, you know, moving into Pro Chom and coaching my champion on how to help us before we get there, whatever that is. Once I achieve that objective, I then want to wrap that up, confirm with the client. You said you would do. This is a time frame for that. I said I would do. This is the time frame for that, and he has on next step. Thank you very much. Goodbye. And when we want it. And now along the way you may find some shiny objects left and right in our conversation. It doesn't mean we ignore those shiny objects, but let's let's get a bookmark problem. And I would say to my claim you know, that was an interesting comment you made about that. I'm going to ask permission to come back and talk about that maybe in our next call, because that would pretty interesting. I want to understand more about that. But let's keep moving forward on what we what the objective of today's call was. Yet that that's a really good things to remember. That you don't want to try and do too much in the conversation and that goes back to your earlier point frank of preparing. Right. You're preparing for that conversation and who you're talking to. You to actively listen, but you're also preparing for what you might want that next step to me and and if the understanding that the small winds add up to the big wind you don't have to eat the elephant all at once. So let's stop with a with the thought whole approach as to how we're going to do this and collect those small winds one at a time. Yeah, you're slowly chipping away at what you need to to create that great value story. We get a lot of questions from from salespeople, listeners of our podcast who maybe progressed the...

...deal a little further than they should have. You talked about always be qualifying, and so they they progressed it. It's not really as baked as it needs to be. They need to go back, they need to do do more discovery. They know they're not alligned to the biggest business issue. What do you recommend in that set situation? How do you back up the deal? Yeah, that's nice. I have a name for I call of the rewind. Okay, I'm old enough to have used cassette takes in my so with makes sense to me. But you know, there's two first as understanding how we got there and the two reasons. I think one is we advanced too far, and the reason we advanced too far would be either made some assumptions that prove out to not be correct. All things themselves have actually changed. Is that the prospect may already have been ahead of us in their journey while we try to draft in. And you know, there's three things that the customers trying to do in their journey. They're trying to determine their requirements, after they acknowledge they have a fact, have a have a problem, then they try to look at all the available options and evaluate those options and then making a decision as to which of those solutions lowers their risk and proved up to be the best possible solution for them. So, while they're doing that, we may draft in to their process at different times with a different set of assumptions and if we come in late, if they already know, for example, if they already know they want to buy us ever get there, and the studies have shown that, you know, the numbers vary between, I think, a sixty seven and eighty three percent of the different studies forester and the like have done of technical buyers who believe they know what they want to buy before they ever engage with the seller. If they happen to already know they want to buy us, well then, as a cell of there's really not much more for me to do. You can send a dog in with a note and get the deal. As sellers, we typically don't see that situation. We typically see a situation where we're entering in a drafting into their buyas journey in a way that they're well in the middle. A lot of their mindset has already been established. So we've got to ask great questions that kind of open the aperture allow them to see things differently from a lens that you know, that we want to provide because it benefits us in some way. We want them to look at us and in a way that the market place hadn't seen us. Or we want to look at the problem in a way that the customer is not looking at it. Maybe we want to expand the problem, make a little bit bigger, make it a little bit with a greatest sense of urgency, maybe getting higher in the organization. Close it a power of money and influence, and that requires us to rewind them in their thinking and the three things we're trying to do. Well, the customers doing those their journey. We're trying to uncover their problems and understand the objectives. You know, they desired business outcomes. We're trying to influence...

...their criteria and, ultimately, we're trying to map our solutions to their their criteria and, ultimately, their outcomes in a way that makes us look like we offer them the best outcome at the lowest risk. Yeah, it's almost listening to you. It's almost you're trying, as you try, to rewind, you're trying to find the gaps in their decisionmaking thus far. What haven't they thought about? What are their landmines are set up to hit if they don't make a shift? And that provides us, yes, and that provides us the ability to add value to the process. If we were able to expand their realm of the possible open their eyes to something they hadn't thought of, a point of view that they hadn't considered. That's adding value. Whether they do business with us or not. Eventually, somewhere along the line, they will find value when our up in our ability to expand their thinking and that act is a positive relationship can be built from that because we actually brought value to what we're doing. Yeah, and you mentioned patients earlier. I think sometimes it may be a struggle or tough if you know you need a deal and you're trying to make your Daqota and you want to almost push the customer forward. When you win, if you were patient and backed up the deal, you probably will have a bigger reward at the end. You know, I when I'm my children were younger than say, Dad, what do you do? And I say I allow other people to have my way. That really quiet patients and as long as my way is mutually beneficial. I don't mind winning as a seller, but I want to make sure that when I win I'm actually bringing value and helping the customers solve the problem that they that they want to solve. I think you can sell good seller can sell something to someone once any time at all what it works or not, but to have that long relationship, what you sell actually has to provide value and ultimately bring them to to the desired outcome. But having it be their idea. It's okay. It's hard, don't you know? John says he doesn't need the credit, he needs the money. You know, I like that saying and I think that that contains a lot to having the customer make the decision as opposed to having one forced upon them. And I know that's worked well for you because you have sold to the same people over and over again at different companies, even here, even here at force, and I'm sure, frank you've told people to selling force that hey, you're not ready for us. That's okay. I think that you know we will not any matter what we're selling, and I'll hold you know several different companies and run, you know, handful of companies in between, and we're not going to have the solution to everybody's problem, and that's okay. If they're looking for a backoffice accounting system and you know, and I sell snow removal equipment, that's...

...probably not a good fit. So you know what knowledge that. But along the way it's also all right to say, you know what, but I have someone who, I have a client who just bought a back office accounting system and you know, they had really good luck with XYC. Why don't I connect the two of you? It's the service we provide. We're in the business of. I think we're in the business of serving others and that's whatever it is we need to do. It happens to be our product and service, that's great. If it happens to be someone else that we can help them with, it's an easy give. I think that's a wonderful thing to do. That's great. So and back to the discovery conversations and we talked about rewining the deal and we know that our customers are prospects. The decisionmakers are having conversations with us when we are in the room and we talk a lot about enabling your champion. We have some other podcasts on that. I linked them up in the show note. But at the same time, more than your champion is talking about your solutions when you're not there. So, beyond those initial conversations that you're having, how do you enable the decision makers to truly understand the value you provide when you're not there. It's sort of this idea of how do you help them command the message when you're not there? Great Question. There's I'm running pull up a little bit iren in Asia for PTC in the early, early days was mostly it was all indirect. was a channel model of the time. I'm three Japanese distributors and I would go over there and would have meetings and I didn't understand the language or speak the language, but they spoken up English for us to get the work done. But while I was in those meetings they would have their sidebar conversations in Japanese. Now I could have protested and said no, no, no, I don't want to be doing that and then come back a month later to pick up the conversation where we left off. That was not very efficient. So allowing them to have their sidebars and then they'd come back and break back into English and we move on with the meeting. So I'll meetings because sometimes be two or three hours well water sidebar conversations with the with the Japanese team actually working out some of these internal things that I didn't understand. Had I understood, they probably wouldn't have done it in front of me. Yeah, that actually happens in every every deals exactly as you said, in the set up. So much of the quote selling happens when we're not in the room. So we talked about having coaches and champions as though they're magically created and they're they're already there. That that's not the way it works. We have to recruit, nurtured, develop and maintain that this status as a champion...

...are as a coach, as the case, maybe if they lack power and an access, but we need to be developing that. We need to enable them with the information, sometimes with the with the tools. I will also role play. I'll say, okay, let's walk through this. What you're going to you're going to go up, you know, I'm going to look in to get access to an economic buyer, or maybe I'm using them as an advanced team for prochureman. So let's play this out. When you going down a pro Chuayman, they're going to want to know this, this and this. What's your answer? How can I help you? What do you need? Maybe I get him a walk around deck, you know, aside powerpoint deck that I call a walk around that something they can walk around their organization with and it shows is the you know, an existential problem is a compelling solution. And here the you know, here the different ways in which we got to this decision and, you know, I need to support to take this forward and to do it in a very effective and efficient way and help them be success. Well, this success out complete is our success as sellers. But don't think that they just naturally show up one day and they have everything they need and they know everything that you want them to know and ought to represent us. We need to we need to invest in them and develop them. Yeah, and that's, you know, for the people out there who have had command in the message. That's why we love the mantras so much, because it aligns everybody on that consistent message, required capabilities, positive business, our terms and metrics, and it makes it consumable, so it could be walked or walk around part of the walk around deck, so to speak. I'm curious trying to hear your tips of how you stay close to the deal. How do you how do you stay close to what's happening in those prospect companies as part of your sales process, knowing that they're having many conversations when you're not there. I think one of the things that that helps that take place is the genuine interest in in the desire to help them achieve their outcomes. The conversation isn't all the email isn't want a status check, I want a status check, I want a status check. There's only so many times in a cycle you can call and, you know, and say just checking and just checking and just checking. It have something of value. Have Hey you, by the way, put out, I think, tremendous content in the blogs in that website. Enforced management is always a new topic and to be able to share that topic with with an existing client in the middle of an engagement or a middle of campaign, you help me do my job very, you know, quite a bit, because I can take something that you it is topical. It's a new conversation about, you know, Sko, about selling in difficult times or whatever. I'll latest blog posters. I can leverage that to say, Hey, I just this just came out. I read through and I thought of you. Go to paragraph three on the second page. I think there's really hit to what we were talking...

...about, you know in our conversation last week. There's ways to do with doesn't have to be homegrown information either. It could be something just coming events topical, you know, whatever it is in the top of the financial newspapers or whatever. The industry of the vertical is something that's relevant to them and relevant to their issues they're having in the problems that we're helping solve. So I think that's one thing is is to bring some value and share our observations and things that might be of interest to them, and I think it is okay to check in on with them and say what do you need? Can I can I be of any service? Can I help you? Are you prepared? You said there was a meeting on November five. Are we prepared for that? What do you need? What can I do to help? It's about them. It's never about ideal. It's always about them in their ability to reach their outcomes and working backwards to create that compelling event that we need to stop now and therefore you need to be prepared to take this forward internally. That's great. When thank you for the compliment on our content. Frank I think to what your point it's it's about providing value to them, to their outcomes, and that's what you've been saying consistently throughout this whole podcast it's not about you and your deal, it's about them and getting the outcomes. And when you have that mindset, some of these things that I'm asking about just become simple because your focused on the right end game exactly. And you mentioned selling in a tough economic environments. We've posted some content about that. I'll be sure to link that up in the show notes as well, and I know in your career, frank, that you've sold through some tough economic environments. What's your advice for people listening out there who this might be their first time selling in a foggy environment or this one is unlike any other one they've had to deal with? How what's your advice for helping them stay focused and motivated? Well, this may very well be the hundred year storm that we're in right now. We've got the trifactor of covid virus and an election and just a handful of very difficult situation, but one thing that brings to light is everything our customers think they know about the behaviors and the needs of their customers is changing. It is changing right now today, and we all have to be thinking about where our customers are going to be when we come out the other side of this. Whether it's, you know, two months, six months, whether it's the end of June, the end of September, we will come through this and to be under to be able to have the conversations about how are you preparing to come out the other side? How are you preparing to kind of skate where the puck is going, if you want to go back, you know, use the Gretzky term. Yeah, that's really the and how these natural events of political events are, the situation we're in with covid how they intersect with markets over time, is really...

...interesting. A lot of people are thinking about that and we can gage with them around that topic and kind of help them think through how they're going to be ready when the time comes and how they're going to know where they need to be based on where their customers will want them to be. It's a very I think it's a very healthy conversation and people are willing to have it. The looking for all the help, guidance and value they can get. We learn a lot from each of those conversations as well, and today is a is a remarkable time to be to be selling anything. How the problems that we have today going to change, how the solutions we're using are anticipating to solve those problems going to change? Are Going to meet to change? Those are really strong conversations and again one in which I think both parties can find value. So in selling through difficult times, I think it's one being transparent, one being genuinely interested in the customers outcome and wanting to be part of that that journey, be part of that solution and just be open. Yeah, you still put, you still perfect. Can provide value even in tough economic times. When we talk about sales, there's always some great stories and I've had the privilege, frank, of hearing many a story from you and some of our all our other colleagues. And I remember one that you said you've told about closing and closing for an next step, and it kind of goes back to the point you were making earlier about always know where you're going to go for the conversation. It was, I believe it was a reputed company to a final meeting. You were going to get the close and the guy reminded the customer about at least option. Listen to remember there. That was a true story company with the Technology Company in Connecticut and the Rep and I went down there and it was a closing call and it was a little further along than I think the rep understood, to the point where the client actually had a purpose all and this is the days when purcose Otto he actually physical and he put the purpose auto on the table and he had it in front of him across the table and we were talking and you had a few questions about, you know, implementation logistics and whatever the the natural post closing questions would be for the next steps. And he's sliding the the and we're all done and we're all excited too. You know, we're not reaching across the table and pulling the purchase auto towards us. Would just kind of being patient. And as there was this moment of silence at the table and as he was sliding the purchase Audur Cross, the salesperson said, I know that you at one point had some some interest in lease options. And as he said that, the the customers sliding the purchase auder cross table stopped and...

...it's halfway across the table and there's this pregnant pause at the table. Are we going to get this there what? And then he sat sliding it back and said, you know, I'll call them John. That's really good. I forgotten about that. Why don't? Why don't we hold on to this and explore that? I'd like you to talk to my finance director now. Did did we get that? We did get that would probably well could have been three to five days later when we did walk through the leasing options with the with the finance team. But that could easily have gone another way. You're not done to get done. And when we left, we walked out the we got to the lobby and I said to this gentleman, I said, did your career pass before your eyes just then? But we did get the deal. But there was a lesson line. Gracious enough to win, be smart enough to win and don't sell beyond the close right. I think all the salespeople listening just threw up when you told that story about the Poles off shifts. And again it slid right back and we were all my and and you know I don't, I don't recall who was last day to quarter type of thing, but you don't very well could have been, and that would have made that were meant a difference. Yeah, all the last day the year there were bonuses that were stock rock and at risk and there's there's a graduated commission rate. Gosh. Well, I'm sure that person never did that again. That's a good one to end on to for every everyone to remember that lesson. Frank you given us a lot of gems here today, a lot of great quotes that I'm going to have a great time putting on some graphics on Linkedin for everybody to see. But it's our one mantra or one bottom line, maybe you've already mentioned it, that you try to follow when you do your job. Yeah, you know, and I've gotten better at this over time, where it became less about me and more about the customer. I believe our role as selves we are stewards and if we take that stewardship seriously and responsibly, we will focus on customer outcomes and when we do that we're going to be just fine that all of our wins will come and you know, in the wake of a client win and at the clients are reaching their objectives, they will call me back, they will buy from me five, six more times, and that's the focus. It's it's outside mindset, however you want to call it, but putting the customers needs and customers outcomes for us, it will always pay dividends. That's great. We'll leave it there. Frank I enjoyed this conversation with you today. Well, I do. Is Well, thank you. Thank you for all you do for us as well. Yes, well, and we thank we thank you for being a great steward of force management. Thank you to all of you for listening to the audible ready podcast. Be Sure to subscribe on your favorite...

...podcast player. You can also subscribe to our blogs at force MANAGEMENTCOM. At force management, we're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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