The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 3 months ago

Lessons Learned in Sales W/ Brian Walsh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Our podcast series “Lessons Learned in Sales” continues this week as John Kaplan talks with Force Management Senior Director of Facilitation Brian Walsh. They discuss: 

  • One experience that showed Brian how to effectively drive urgency in his deals.
  • What the best sales leaders he worked with did
  • How to recruit A-players and secure them from their existing organizations.
  • The time his client was ready to sign a major deal and the one thing he forgot that almost cost him that deal.

Here are some additional resources based on the conversations with Brian:

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or our website .

In that moment, I remember learningthe lesson of urgency. Yeah, don't wait, but there's always something elseyou can be doing to provide value and move the deal fhone. You're listeningto the audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sellmore faster. Will feat your sales leader sharing their best insights on how tocreate a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by theteam at force management, a leader in BB sales effectiveness. Let's get started, big bad Brian Walls. Brother, I'm good. How are you?Great to see you, but I'm doing fantastic. I've been waiting for this. I've been waiting for this segment with you for a while. We've reallybeen enjoying these as as our listeners have been getting to know our facilitators better. So I'm not sure many people know how far you and I go back, but I got one of the first questions I wanted to just to askyou was like just for the listeners. Obviously I'm aware, but how didyou wind up coming to force management? Well, I mean I officially camein September two thousand and twelve, but if one in twelve. Yeah,but, as you mentioned, it goes back to the early S, rightwhen you and I first met. So you know, you and I werein that same management development track at Xerox and we met at least Burke,the Zeros International Training Center, where you and I both did a two yeartour of duty, and we didn't know of each other until we both gotthere. And the end it was was funny was you know I was Igrew up in northern Ohio and was working here and you had grown up inDetroit. We're working there. So we were at that far apart, butthe way the company was built back then, we were in separate world's right.We really were in our own little district. And so we met.I'd been at Leasburg a year and you...

...came in and you were coming inat the beginning of my second year, from the beginning of year first yearin that program and and was your wife and was about to have your second. I would have been yeah, what's Emily, you're right here. Iwould have been second, yeah, and so you and I just became fastfriends and to me it felt like we'd known each other forever when we firstmet. Yeah, well, I you know, I have really fond memoriesof that. You know, that corporate training and Development Center. I'd neverguessed that I would ever be doing what I'm doing for a living, butif it hadn't have been for what I learned from that Corporate Training and DevelopmentCenter and from you. So you were my mentor when I got there andI often told people. I remember telling Grant Wilson, the CO founder offorce management, when we started the company and I said, man, ifwe ever get any bigger, I can't wait to introduce you to Brian Wallace, who is the best front of the room person that I've that I've evermet, and I would say that to him all the time. And youknow, grant would say to me, hey, watch, called Brian andI'm so I was calling you. Yeah, I think you have to correct meon this, but I tell people that I think you of all ofmy years of sales management and just management, I think that you were probably oneof my cuveted recruits, because it took me ten years to recruit you. I think I called you every single year. Not You know, ourfamilies know each other and you know, so we were catching up, butI would always just always throw that in and say hey, bud, howyou doing? You know, yeah, but here course was always I wasalways too scared. You know. Yeah, you know how I'm built. I'mone of these loyal types and and I you know, I always appreciateit. Meant a lot, but I was always I always had an excusenot to come. It was like, Oh, I'm going to get mymaster's are, oh, I just got the next job and and or we'reabout to have our next child. So...

I always had a reason. Butwas what I find fascinating about that actually, John is in two thousand and twelve, when I decided I wanted to move on and change careers, itwas I reaching out to you and it was just a weird you know,just it was my turn that time to reach out to you. In themoment you heard me say it, you were like, well, let's go, and so then, you know, over the next few months we figuredit all out and I was I was so excited. What was really funnywas when I reached out to you, I wasn't even thinking about coming.I was just saying, Hey, I'm starting a job search and I needsome advice and counsel, and you were you said, well, wait aminute, why not us? That's so it was really it was so organic, it was so natural in terms of how it all happened, which Ithought in the end was really a good thing right. And you know,I think for everybody listening, and I talked about this with organizations when wewhen we talk about these kinds of topics, what you and granted for me asI transitioned out and transitioned in. You know, you helped me transitionout in a way that I'm not sure I would have been able to doon my own, because I had never had to have those conversations. Inever really had to prepare for them and you, the two of you,really helped me think through what it was like to to be able to leave, and I mean I knew I wanted to leave gracefully and all that,but you really helped me think through it and I think that's a like,not that this was supposed to be a learning moment, but like they're,there's like a nugget here that I hope anybody listening with think about if you'regetting ready to do something that's going to change your life or change your career, it's just as important to be ready for that moment when you're going totell people, and you and you and grant really helped me think through thatand understand how important it was to do that. That was really so it'sso critical. I mean you and I talked about this a lot with withcompanies that that we work with. You got to be recruiting all the timeand you know, I'm kind of proud of the fact that you and Istayed and you and I had meaningful conversation...

...probably every year from the first fewyears of for force management and when we were looking to, you know,to scale, and you know the responsibility that I felt to help because Iknew anybody a talent like you, and so far our listeners that are listeningto this like if you're recruiting an a player like Brian, was an aplayer and not in play player. You got to catch him in transition andyou gotta you know, he knew enough about force management over time, justbecause we had been talking every year about force management. But to get BrianReady, to get you ready, briant, to go have that conversation, becausewhen you were done, you were like, okay, I want todo this right and but you know, I'm done and I'm I said,Brian, they're not going to let you go, dude, like if youthink you're going to walk in there and say, Hey, want to dothis right, want to do is greatfully or whatever, and you know they'regoing to throw the kitchen sink at you, which and I think most people reallyunderestimate that. Most recruiting managers really underestimate if you're going after an aplayer and you want them, that same company that's potentially going to lose themis going to want to keep them just as bad. And that was areally good experience that you and I had because we were prepared. We wereprepared and you know, Zare Arc came back to you and say, Brian, you know, how about this and how about that? And you werevery gracious and professional and you'd already made up your mind and and so itworked out in a great transition. But I think people really underestimate if you'vebeen with a company for a while and you're doing really well, if youdon't think they're going to lay down in the door in front of you beforeyou go, then your it's harder to leave than most people think. Yeah, one thing to get somebody say I'm going to leave. It's anything tomake sure they actually do. Yeah, right, yeah, and so thatwas we're so thankful, Dude. We're so thankful that you came. It'salmost been ten years now, which blows me away. And you know,you're one of the favorite facilitators in the...

...company. Companies just loved you,participants just loved you, and and so we're really, really thankful. Andyou run that organization now. So now you're recruiting other facilitators to come andyou're developing other facilitators. So it's just such a joy for me to havethis conversation with you. Let's dive into the list of things that we've beenkind of consistent talking to the other facilitators about. Let's back it up alittle bit. Why did you get into sales, briance, why'd you getinto sales? So the short story is I enter college as an accounting majorand I was a company years in. I was doing fine, but Igot involved in a lot of the business school activities and before you knew it, I was, you know, doing some some speech contests and, doyou know, some public speaking and stuff, and then you know about my summerjob at the big amusement park here up on Lake Erie, and thatit was those two experiences. It was some of these college experiences and gettinginvolved in like programming and doing stuff in the business school, and then thissummer job where I was effectively doing a bad stand up act twenty times aday for, you know, ten, twelve minutes on the big riverboat andpeople, adults, you know I'm a nineteen, twenty year old kid,and and these adults would come up to me after or they'd ask questions atthe end of that boat ride and you know, what are you majoring in? And I'd say counting and people would laugh and I'd have I'd have menand women stopped me after and say hey, kid, you're a marketing guy,you're a sales guy, you're this. So I went back to school formy junior and I went to my I still remember his name, DrKimmel, my favorite accounting teacher, and I went into his office and Ialready had my course work set out for the for the for the year toinclude I think. I think I was supposed to take tax accounting that falland I said, listen, I'm starting to think maybe I'm more of amarketing sales major, and he looked at...

...it me and he said, well, it's about time you figured it out and really yeah, and he literallypick stood up. He said come on and he walked me down on thehall to the Marketing Department and he personally helped me change my course slow andI just and and from there. Back then, Zeros had a big presenceon campus. You know, imagine one of the big technology players. Ohyeah, right, and they would come in into these business seminars and theytake fifteen or twenty college students for three four days, and I apply togot into that and what I didn't know was they use that as a recruitingmechanism. They would look, they would use that to look for talent,and four or five of us out of that group of fifteen or twenty endedup taking jobs there as sellers, and the rest is history. I mean, you know, it's amazing. It's amazing when I think about you andyou tell me died. I didn't know I or I had forgotten that youwere an accounting major, because it seems so it seems so unnnbelievable. You'reprobably one of the most extroverted. Not that accountants are, in you know, introverted, but yeah, but the stereotype, you know, for youare just one of the most extroverted people I've ever met. And I remembera time where we were groofing around and we were in the car and youand me and Kenny grinned deer and we're joking around and I'm not I'm notgoing to embarrass you, but I'm going to try not to embarrass you,but dude, you have like you're a professional performer, meaning singer, likeyou are. Yeah, you are one of the best singers I've ever metthat doesn't do it for a living. Nice. And so do you rememberthat day when we were in the car and I was going to try toenvirass you and they in that little tape had in your car that I putit in and grinning and I were just like, holy smoked, Brian,is that you? Yeah, that was available. Yeah, so that's youknow that. And then and then you get into the job and because youknow, when you're right out of college and you get this job, inthis case in sales. I think, John, a lot of your desireto stay in that perfection, whatever profession...

...it is has a lot to dowith your initial experiences and I was actually going to quit after about six months. My first boss was per sonna and Brada. He was never there andmy I got a second job that next January and second boss at next January, and I know we're going to talk about some of that later, buthe's really the reason I stayed and because of that I was able to reallydevelop and flourish and see sales is more than just making money, which wasobviously a big part of it, but also this. Hey, there's alot of value and just like the service that you give and how you helppeople think through problems and if you're not the very fit, if you dothis well, it's a consultative approach and doesn't really matter. And like youget over the hurt of being rejected. It was, you know, that'sthe other part. I got lucky. I landed in a place that hada sales mentality. You know that, and I had a couple of managersearly in my career who really made a difference. My experience was very,very, very similar to yours. Thank God for that. Academic Advisor.Yeah, you can't even have matt. Well, I know what you wouldprofessorate. I know you would be. You'd be on Broadway or doing somethinglike that. It's well, that was the goal. Yeah, goal isto actually be a performer, and my family, and including some people whowere in the business, said go get a business degree and then, ifyou want to do that for living, come out to Los Angeles, kindof thing. Well, you know now that I find my my calling professionallyhere, but I also I also met Jenny in college, and so,yeah, you know, those two things changed everything. Yeah, I'm notallowed to say you know what. You know what I want to say aboutthe clown, shady clown, just to say I think the phrase is yououtkicked your coverage their brother. That's right, let's say it. Just put itin bad. I did. I did. Yeah, Hey, let'sstuff, let's dig into some little bit of funny. So this will bethis will be good. With you tell me the the worst mistake that youthink that you ever made in a sales job. Oh A, and fortunatelyI learned the lesson as a as a...

...rat, and I got the story. I was a bit of a waiter in that I would wait for thingsto happen and I had this boss who who? I think I'm tired ofme waiting, and I they would see end of the quarter. And Iremember I had a couple of deal still on the table and I only neededone of them to get over the quarterly bonus and I was waiting and shesays, as I remember, pat a Lazato, she says, you gottwo deals left on the table and it was the last day of the orderand she says you only need one of them to get over the line.Which one has a better chance? And I said this one. It wasa school district that was relatively close to our office, and she said,well, what are you doing? I said, well, I'm waiting.I think the guy's name was Jerry, the business manager. I said I'mwaiting for Jerry to call me and tell me he's got, you know,we've got the order. And she said she loooked at her watch. Itwas like two o'clock in the afternoon. She said, why are you sittinghere? And I just looked at her and she just go like go thereand wait, go knock on the door. So I said okay, so Iget my car and I drive over and I you know, I walkedinto the Board of Education Office and I tell tell his this rave assistant,you know why I'm there. She knew why I was you know, sheknew and she said, well, let me see if he can see you. And so I sat down and I'm in the lobby. She she goesback, she comes back. I she says, he said he can seeit, but it's going to be a bit. I said no problem.I sat there for two and a half hours. HMM. I waited andI waited and I waited and I didn't leave because I knew if I leftpat was going to kick me in the head when I got back. SoI waited and wait, they wait, and finally it was it was alreadyfive o'clock, or maybe just after. He comes out and he lets meback to his office and from there I go in and he's giving me abit of a hard time and he finally gives me the order and I goback to the office and you remember those...

...days, we would keep the thethe lights on for order and Oh yeah, and you know all that. AndI got the order and I got my bonus and it wasn't until yearslater, I don't remember how many years, where she was back in Cleveland andwe were talking in that story came up and she says, you know, he knew you were coming. So that, she says, I calledhim all shit the moment ter office. Yeah, that's all here remember.And said, listen, here's what's going on. I need to teach hiskid a lesson. And he made me wait outside of his office for twoand a half hours. He was he had every tent of giving us theorder that day, but she and he cooked up this little plan. IsTak us and Oh, yeah, I never but I never waited again.You know what I mean? Yes, I was, and a taught mea good lesson about and I saw, I saw like a video recently withJohn McMahon, who I've never met but I know, you know very well, but he made this comment about a rep I want to say in Italy, and this concept of urgent and Authentic Discarlo. Yeah, and I lovethat story because it literally brought that back through this my story, back tome and I I look in that moment, I remember learning the lesson of urgency. Yeah, don't wait, but there's always something else you can bedoing to provide value and move the deal forward. In those kinds of things. So that's a great story, Dude. I love that. Hey, tellme, tell me what's the funniest thing that's ever happened to you ona sales call? And I probably when you got this list of questions beforehand, you're like, well, which one do I pick? I know,and so I'm gonna I'm picking the first one. Okay, this is thefirst one. I was twenty three years old and I'm working in Youngstown,Ohio and I'm calling on the mid market customers at that point, right I'mjust like the new business rep for the for the mid market customers, andI had this deal. I was working...

...at youngstown welding and I still rememberthe name of the coming back. I looked about the other day. They'restill there. I had this deal I was working on and and they hadone of our devices, but they had a whole bunch of competitive stuff,both, you know, copiers and even some printers back then, and typewriterswere big back then. You know. Yeah, them's electrics and we're tryingto replace them with the Zarak's memory writer and stuff, and I remember islooking at this account. Home boy, this would be a big account forsomebody like me. I'm just trying to replace the one zerox device to youknow, getting the new technology, and get up, get a foothold inand one thing led to another and they demoled one of our memory riders andthey loved it. Everything was great. And this guy pulls me in hesays, listen, we're going to think about doing that one copy, butthe rest of stuff we can't afford right now. So now all of asudden, my big deal is falling apart and I go last you don bundleall the price. Yeah, yeah, that's right, but yeah, that'sright, right, and he says, and I quote, boy, itwould be a shame if, you know, like he made some comment about gettingburglarized. It would be a shame if we got burglarized. And youknow, and I just passed right past me. And about a week later, on a Monday morning, I caught I get a call at the officeand it's him and he says, Hey, you're not going to believe what happened. And so what's that? He says, we got burglarized over theweekend. All of our IDM typewriters are gone. What and they had someonehad burglarized. They did take any of the tooling you anything like that.They took all in. sobody came in and stole all the office gripmen.So we know. So now I'm like, Oh, so now I'm okay,I'm coming out. But I actually have someone traveling with me today thatthey were doing a big blitz day and they brought all the region people andhad this woman from Chicago I had never met before. It was a regionperson, Nancy Allen. I still remember her name, and we go outand we meet with this guy that day and I've got the pricing built in, etcetera, etce. And and here's...

...the best part. So not onlyis this like going to be an easy sale right because they got insurance money. I don't know what's going on. All I know what they're about tobuy a bunch of stuff. I got the proposal ready and he says helooks at it and I had introduced him to her and he knows she's likethe beat, one of the big region people, and he says, Ithink we're ready to go. I said okay, and she looks at meshe is great, let's let's write the order. Now. You know,back then we had order agreements. Yeah, right, right there in the spot. Yeah, I didn't have one. Oh, have an order a dream. O. Wait, I didn't have an order agreement. I havethe sheepishly look at this guy and say I don't have an order agreement andshe looks at me. She just you don't have an order agreement. Igo no, and she takes over. She looks and she says I probablyshouldn't metually weren't well statural limitations. At this point I said Dave. Shesays, Dave, can we come back in about an hour, because ouroffice was right down the street. He says sure. He looks at megoes you're in trouble. She Says No, no, no, no, sowe're going to go back and write the orders and bring them back fromthe sign and on the way back to the office she says, all right, we're going to make a deal right now. I said, what's that? She said, we're not going to tell anybody ever about you not havingan order agreement for that call, but you're never going to go on acall again without an order agreement in hand. And they're lucky you were. Andthere are some and yeah, we're return the really cool people man,because I never wouldn't live that. The crew I was working for. Inever lived that. Everyone to live it down. I never told anybody thatbecause she and I had that agreement. But it was a funny, funnybecause then we went back, we got the deal sign we went, thethree of us went to lunch and we just laughed and laughed and left andyou know, to the day I left Youngstown, which was a year sold, you know, two year loop to two year later to the next roleI was in, he and I were stayed in touch. You know,they were ongoing customers stuff, and he never told me what really did happenor didn't happen. Yeah, because it's kind of burglarized. Yeah, herented burglarized before you even left the first...

...time. Yeah, it was likesome out of a movie wetly Hunkstown. That's the kind of thing that wouldhappen in yes. So yes, I think he was just tired of theIB of type pris exactly right, and the people knowing about him. That'sexactly right. Hey, dude, who's the best salesperson or sales leader thatyou ever worked with in your career? The best salesmanager ever had was JeffCanada. He taught me himsell. He taught me how to sell. Hetaught me about preparing your day, really knowing where you're going the next daythe night before. He taught me about how to have conversations with clients thatwere about them first, not our product first. WHO's like? You know, he's a second manager I ever had. He was, he was and tothis day I owe him a lot about just pure sales skills and thebest. And I had other great managers in pat and Freddie Thomas another.So you know that it's almost unfair to ask me who it is. Yeah, and then the best me and driver I had from a leadership perspective wasBrian leading. But again I worked with some other you know, I gotthe chance to work, not too closely, but I got chance to meet amokay here, CEO, and yeah, times. I was really lucky tohave great people to look up to. But Brian Lee edy, just likeJeff Canada, was willing to meet you wherever you were. And thatjust me, but anyone that worked for them right. So, as aseller, Jeff Canada was great at that. As a leader, Brian was greatat that. Teaching you how to lead right. So I was.I got was really lucky, and I think what they have in common wasthat they were both able to meet you wherever you were in your skill setand give you the next thing that you needed and really coach you on it, not just tell you what to do. They were both great coaches of skilland the skill that you needed in the role that you were in atthe time. Yeah, you, you guys said great leaders and coaches,and Cleveland and you mentioned Freddy Thomas and Freddy's time. Yeah, in theOhio. Yeah, I think the the...

...what they call them business, youand it back then. Yeah, and Freddy had a twin brother named JohnnyThomas, and Johnny Thomas was one of one of my great mentors, andI got to tell you I was thinking about John the other day and Idon't know how to be people. We averaged on a team. Brian Stummarrebetween seven and ten, and giant probably had a group of about ten,probably, Yep, and the managers that you're referencing, they had big teamsas well, just because they had a lot of capacity. But think aboutthis concept. John Thomas called me every morning at seven am, every singlemorning at seven am. John Thomas called me every night at ten pm andI remember in the early days my wife and she would be like, youknow, what type of a lunatic are you working for Paul's? And thephone would ring, and I think it was just in the beginning days whenwe might have had cell phones that weren't these big brick things. But rightthinking it, a lot of times you would just call them on the homephone. You didn't have to call waiting whatever, but you just knew thatthat's John Thomas and I have such an appreciation for that today. So,listeners, I'm not telling you that you got to call your but I'm justtelling you right about this. He was so instrumental in me showing up preparedevery single day and for the next day. He'd be like, okay, whereare you going today? You Bo Boone. We talked about what areyou going to say? Let's roll play that conversation. Yeah, it wasn'twhat time he has calling you wouldn't be doing that anymore, but but you'rewe're right on it. The level of care that those leaders took unbelievable.For you that, because that's really what because if it wasn't care for youthey wouldn't have done it as consistently if it was only worrying about John's gota deal in the forecast that I got to make sure it comes through.That's when. That's the only time you hear from him. But you heardfrom people like Jeff and Fred and John,...

...his brother, etcetera, consistently.Like Jeff, Canada had a team of major account reps, yeah,the biggest accounts on the eastern out Ohio, and then me, I was thelittle commercial rep because you had to have one over there. Jeff wasgoing to make his number with or without me. My number, my performancewas meaningless to Jeff's team performance. He spent as much, if not more, time with me than he did with anybody else in his team. Consistently. Yeah, you know, that such good, such good valuable nuggets.When I think about that, is like you talked about meeting people where theyare. Talked about investing, helping people be prepared, regardless of you knowthey're there, you know, regardless of how much revenue they're bringing to thetable. I mean that Jeff was investing at you because he knew you weregoing to run the place something like you did. Yeah, and I thinkJohn was doing the same thing with me. But the interesting thing was they didthat with everybody. So when I started to feel comfortable to just notcomplain but just go man, this dude calls me and he goes yeah,me too, and I check with everybody on my team. And John Thomaswas doing that with every single rap that he had on his team. CallHim in the morning and then call him in the evening and asked him howto day went. Okay, what are you going to adjust for tomorrow?Just really, really old school, which is just a just a lost leadership. Pard, I think all right. Last question, brother, last questionfor you. What's the best piece of sales advice you ever got, andthat maybe you don't often here. Best piece of sales advice you ever got? What we will kind of we're kind of swimming around it right now.I mean, I think a lot of people hear the word prepare a lot, but the word I hear used the one that really sticks with me inand the one that is kind of akin to that, and it reminds meof one of the best reps I ever worked with, who sadly passed awaylast year. Much to young Dan on USCA was strategy. And what Imean by that is if you were working...

...on a deal with Dan, itwas a career seller, co executive, product specialist. He carried the bigiron at Serok, so you know he I'm sold the big stuff. Danwas the one who would always get the group to stop, you know,because everybody's ready to run out the door and go. You know, whatdo you like to say? Rip The heads off chickens throughout. Yeah,I was ready to just go take the hill. People ready go take thehill. And Dan would be the one, a few days ahead of time,say, wait a minute, hold on, what's our objective for thismeeting? What's our agenda? What's the choreography like? Who's going to do? What went? What's the outcome? And then what's the question we're goingto ask at the end? Like Dan was this master strategist that would reallyget the team to think through those four or five things. We Never Danand I were peers and then and was a product specialist. One I wentoff to Virginia that I came back and at one point I was, youknow, running a team and Dan was on the team, and then Iwas running the region and dam was still a part of the team. SoDan and I had this long career together and he was one of the people, not the only one, but he was one of the people that Ialways knew he was always going to be ready and, more importantly, theteam collectively was going to be ready because of his mindset. And you neverwent on a call with Dan that went wrong. Never imagine that. Never. Yeah, you didn't always get the outcome you wanted. Right, that'snot what I'm suggested, but it was always well done, it was alwayswell thought out, it was always well executed. He was a master atthat and I makes me think about strategy. Some of the best advice that Igot, and probably in our zerox days. I can't remember who itcame from, but they were telling me the difference between stress and pressure sure, is preparedness. Yeah, absolutely, and that is you know, nowthat we're just kind of reminiscing a little bit, that was a wonderful lessonthat we learned early. That just never...

...goes away. It's still well,it is still the same for me today. Yeah, and there in lies,I think, the nugget, which is everything we talked about today hasnothing to do with the fact that we sold when we sold or, youknow, the market is changed or any of that stuff. The reality isthe things we're talking about our tenants, that do not change. These areuniversal truths that do not change and that's the beauty, no doubt about it. So, brother, we are so blessed to have yet force management.The what you do in the marketplace and the and the market feedback and customerfeedback and the participant feedback is always just first class. We're so thankful tohave you, so grateful to have you and I know that we're you know, we're growing leap and bounce here forts management. I'm surprised we even gotto for this podcast with your schedule, but I think I will to doit. Yeah, brother, I thank you for the time. You're anabsolute blessing to us, them, to and to our listeners that we justwish you continued success and then also best wishes to best wishes to the family. Thanks my friend. Thanks brotherly, fun to do this. I'll seea soon. No doubt brother's eason care of us. But at force managementwe're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programsthat build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the abilityto execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is ourexperience. The proof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US atforce MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To notmiss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Untilnext time,.

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