The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Manager Tips of the Day

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you want to be a great manager, it takes a different skillset than what it takes to be a great seller. After all, being a great player of the game doesn’t guarantee you’ll be a great coach. Our own Patrick McLoughlin is passionate about building valuable sales coaches. His “Manager Tip of the Day'' gets a lot of attention on LinkedIn so we decided to have him share his most popular tips for sales managers in this podcast.

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An amateur sales person will practice them till they get it right. A professional salesperson will practice them till they can't get it wrong. You're listening to the audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sell more faster. will feature sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team at force management, a leader in B tob sales effectiveness. Let's get started. A quick update for all of our audible ready podcast listeners. Force management is launching a second podcast, revenue builders. We will still be publishing audible ready every Tuesday, but every Thursday we will also be bringing you revenue builders. It will be hosted by our cofounder, John Kaplin, and John McMahon, who many of you also know as a five time zero and the author of the qualified sales leader. John Kaplin and John McMahon will be joined by leaders who will share their lessons learned and advice for all of us out there on that revenue grind. It will publish every Thursday starting march seventeen. You can find it on all your favorite podcast players. Go ahead and subscribe so you don't Miss an episode. Hello and welcome to the audible ready sales podcast. I'm Rachel Clap Miller. To Day, our own Patrick McLaughlin joins us for our PODCASTS, particularly or managers. Patty Mac, welcome. Hey, Rachel, how are you good? I know you're this is a topic that is near and dear to your heart. Yes, Manager Day. Are Matt yet you're probably talking about my manager quote of the day. Yeah, I think sales managers have the toughest job in the world and I just think that many organizations don't spend a lot enough time helping them and developing their skills, and I...

...also think there's so much pressure on them and everything they have to do every day that they really don't have enough time to spend on their own personal development. So, yeah, as much impact as I can have to help people become more effective in their management jobs, I think it's critical for organizational success. Right, it's a tough job, it's a promotion, but sometimes you're stepping into the lines done in that role. So for those of you who follow force management on social and if you're not, you should be, or if you're connected to Patty Mac on Linkedin, you may have seen his manager thoughts of the day and you just kind of referenced it. They are great gems and quick concepts you can embrace for your day. Yeah, so you know is actually a customer. He called them Patty machisms because I was giving them very training and they were like, you know, you should publish those things and like where did you get them from? And I said are they just things that I've picked up over the years, little phrases and sayings and thoughts, and I just started collecting them and remembering them and writing them down. And what I've written them down? I've said, you know what, I'm going to share them with everybody and I've used the linkedin platform to do those share. So sometimes they come out, you know, every day and there's a couple of times there's I missed a couple of days just because like I haven't thought of something, but I try to. I try to think about it every morning and put something out there. Yeah, it's they're great as you scroll through social quick things to remember. So I wanted to bring Patty Mac in so we can go through some of the most popular ones. And I know, I mean you probably have like close to forty now and we went through the list the other day in the office and the first one that rose to the top for you that you wanted to talk about in this podcast was call at least twenty customers every month. It's surprised them by saying, Hey, I just called to say hello, thanks for being a customer and just to see how things are going. Yeah, that was a big one for me and here's why. Just my schedule. The last two weeks I've been working with clients doing medic training and it just came up like when is the best time to build the champion? And my belief is the best time to build a champion is when you're not in an active sales like what...

...are you doing to educate your champions on the industry, what other customers are doing, or just even just calling to check in and say hello? Right, most customers believe sellers only show up when there's an opportunity and, more importantly, when I think about, you know, covid and everything that we're going through with this hybrid workforce and how we're going to go back to work, just calling up a person and saying hey, how are things going and thinking about you? How's your job. You know, how's your family? How are things going? I think it it just shows that we're human and we're just not there to sell something to the customer, and I think that's that's quite important. Right we have those vendors that only call us when the yearly review is ready to the contract is better to right now, and you're like, I know you're calling me, you don't really care about my family. But you know, I think I'm working on another podcast where it's tips for staying in touch with your customer, and that's really what you're talking about here. Stay in touch, not just when you need something. Absolutely just pick up the phone, Salo, and check in with your customers, thank them for being customers and, you know, and ask him how their job is going, how's everything going on in their lives? It just it's so critical in developing and maintaining the human relationship. Yeah, okay, so let's move to the next one. Always provide a context to help people understand. Don't yell at the Score Board. Yeah, so the first one was one that I picked up as a sales leader early in my career. In the second part, don't you know, the scoreboard something I learned it force management right, you know, salesman or just tend to yell at the scoreboard. We need to we need to increase performance, we need to increase revenue, increase calls, but it's putting it in context for people on how to do that. Any anyone, can say we need to close deals. It's the leader that connects the how to close to why we should close. Right, most people know why we should do something, of what we should do, but great leaders connect the how to. So the example I would be giving...

...from a sales manager's perspective is think about a time when you closed a deal that your person or the person reports to you is in a similar position and ten instead of telling them what to do, maybe give them the story of how you did it. Give them a theater to consume it and process it. And I think when you do that and you do storytelling, which is really the ability to connect means and emotion together, it becomes a learning experience for a person. So don't just tell me what to do, give me an example of how you did it in a story and provide some context about it, and then I can consume it and figure out how I'm going to take it and use it in my world. So I think that's critical for sales leaders. Sometimes we think we're pressed for time and we just tell our people what they should do, and it's the ability to take a step back, think about what we're going to do, prepare how our conversation is going to go and put it in context that allows our people to consume it has as some really good impact. So I always loved working for people who always gave me examples and you know, it's just great examples inside a force management of great leaders that provide great context around principles of command of the message and everything we do here force management. Yeah, I mean we've all worked for those leaders that yell a lot scoreboard. I've certainly done that. But the ones I stand out for your point, Batty Matt, the ones that provide the how, and we say that a lot. Don't just give the what, provide the how. But that concept of well, how do you provide the how? Right, that's another concept. But I like your idea of walking them through a story, show them, talk to them how you had done it in a previous situation, because that really just helps people of absorb the house so they can execute on it. Yeah, it's so important because then whoever's listening to this story and you won't know. When you've heard a great story. You remember it, but if someone would just give you a factor figure, you tend not to remember it, but when someone puts it in some context of a story, you to tend to remember that story and I think that creates for a great learning experience for your people. Yeah,...

...okay, Great. The next one specifically for managers, and this kind of ties into what you were just talking about. Be a learning team. What do you mean by be a learning team? Okay, so this one's kind of interesting and just goes to the things that I've remembered all my life. Like I've remembered all my life just simple quotes. And so my first job was at McDonald's, and at McDonald's there was a break room and inside of the break room was this plaque of ray CROC who many people know is the founder McDonald's, and I'm not here to debate the morals of Ray Crock but but having said that, there was a saying on the wall and it said when you're green you're growing, when you're right you rot. And you know, I took that to me I need to continually invest in my skills and knowledge. So one of the things that I try to do with a lot of our clients is the modern day salesperson needs to continuely invest in their skills and knowledge. They should own the value that they provide to their clients, and so I always ask salespeople at time. I said, well, do you know more? Can you provide more than your website? Because if you can't, you really don't have additional value. Because think about it, so many websites are full of proof points and metrics and positive business outcomes and case studies and Industry Information, and our customers are so much more educated and so much more prepared to have conversations that we need continually invest in who we are. So like, for example, me personally, I put aside about three hours a week for personal developed through Linkedin profile, read on Linkedin articles. I actually subscribe to a couple of graduate schools websites to get information from m MIT Sloane and Harvard. Business with you and just read what's going on in the industry. I think that it's so important that we need to know what's going on in our customers world. And then the other thing is is as a sales leader, when you demonstrate to your people that you're constantly learning,...

...then it sets the bar that there should be no excuses for them not to invest in themselves. So I think that really good teams are continually looking to strive and get better, and I really like the phrase own the value you're going to provide to your customers, and that takes an investment in your in your skills and your knowledge and what's going on in the world today right it allows you to be better for yourselves, that are for your team and then, to your point, better for your customer. Yeah, absolutely. I really like this next one, especially when we're talking about learning. I know I've heard you say it's several times. It's better to sweat and practice and to bleed in battle. Yeah, graphic here on the PODCAST, Patty Matthew, it is a little bit is a little graphical for sure, but here's what it means. And you know what, we use a lot of sports analogies of force management and I'm going to use one here because I think this is why it's important. If you are in the NBA, you shoot layups and do shoot arounds before a game. If you're in Major League baseball you take batting practice. If you're a golfer, you go to the driving range, if you're in tennis player, you warm up. I think warmups and practice and investing in your skills is so important. Michael Jordan had a famous saying. He said I practiced harder than I played because when I got into the game my body knew how to react, and I I took that saying to be like wow, the difference between a amateur salesperson in a professional salesperson is this, and amateur salesperson will practice until they get it right. A professional salesperson will practice until they can't get it wrong, and I think that's critical. I think we need to role plays, I think we need to prepare for sales calls and I think it's critical that we be situationally fluent, audible, ready to be able to listen and and be proactive of in all...

...of our customer conversations. And I think it's critical that we take the time to prepare so we don't sprain an ankle or pull a hamstring or potentially lose a deal. Right. We've said it too before. You don't want to practice in front of the customer right, because that's game day. Absolutely, absolutely. Like why? Why, Guy always tell salespeople when we go to role play day? Why is selling the only profession where we train you on something and allow you to go then and flick it on your customers without saying it? Yes, of course we. You know. So I do at produce a lot of the content for force management and we're always writing bogs and producing these podcasts, and I use a phrase like what's the goal of your content? Sometimes it's to get people to come into the website and book a meeting so we can sell right, but the other goal of a lot of this content is to give people the ability to exercise the sales muscle, and that's a phrase I use a lot, and that goes to your point of because then it's muscle memory, right, if you're continuing to exercise it. Absolutely, yeah, I like that. That's good. I like that. Maybe that'll end up in another tip of the day. They end up in another potty MAC quote. You can, you can take it. You could dig it. Okay. So the last one I want to I want to wrap up with a really love this one. Have the courage to keep it simple, don't make business harder than it is. Yeah, so that's a big one for me. And here's why. I think we tend to overthink and things. I think we tend to overrepare. During role play days I see salespeople come up with these grandiose questions, they come up with these elaborate two and three part discovery questions and I think it's really hey, listen, the customer has a pain and we need to understand what that defined pain is and and we have to always remember that the reason why customers will buy from us is because we can get them to a place that they can't get on...

...their own. And I think if you keep things simple, that we are dealing with human beings, that if there's a defined pain, rarely will a customer qualify themselves out of a deal. And if you're working to solve that business pain, the customer will stay involved and I always think that we should just keep things as simple as possible and not try to make our process, as a customers come process to complex to deal with. So I always try to think, you know what do they say that the quickest or the shortest path is a straight line. I think that's very critical from a sales perspective is following a defined process and keeping simple to create a great customer experience. Right, I love that. Of course, sometimes I don't have a capacity for anything more than simplicity. But Patrick, you know you mentioned it at the top. You've been a manager, you've managed managers. As you said, it's a difficult job. Now you're training managers. What kept you focus when you were in that role and and what last words of advice would you leave managers as we close out this conversation today? Oh, I guess the biggest thing that I learned was to error on with spending more time with your people. Spend time in the field, travel, speak with your people, listen to your people, learn from your people, show them that you're willing to do the job with them. I think that is so critical for managers. I think sometimes managers spend too much time in the office or too much time preparing for the future, and there's no better time than the present and being in the field and demonstrating what good looks like for Your People, Coaching your people and actually I think some of the best leaders actually fail sometimes in front of their people to show their people that they're human and that it does happen and that they will learn from it and become better for it. So I would say to people, for managers out there, error on spending more time with your people. The rewards and the dividends will be exponential down the...

...road. I love that. You know, we also say sales is a game of inches and when you think about the little things that make the difference, everything that you've talked about today is really helps make those inches valuable, including spending time with your people. Thanks so much for joining me for this conversation, Patty Mac. Thanks, Rachel, good talking to you. I have a nice day. Yes, and all of you who are listening make sure you link up with Patti Mac on Linkedin it. If you search Patty Mac, that will not come up, but you have to search Patrick Laffan from force management. I'm sure he'll be happy to connect with you and you can see all of his manager thoughts of the day. Thank you for listening to the audible ready sales podcast. At force management we're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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