The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 1 month ago

Persuasion

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The idea of persuasion can give salespeople a bad rap. Instead, flip the script. The best sellers don’t persuade customers, they let customers persuade themselves. John Kaplan joins us to detail how you can get your buyer to come to their own conclusions in a way that steers the opportunity in your favor.

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We all know, buyers don't like to be told what to do. They like to tell you what they need and have you consult with them on how to get there. You are listening to the audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sell more faster. Will feat your sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team at force management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let's get started. Hello and welcome to the audible ready sales podcast. I'm Rachel Club Miller. Today we're talking persuasion. John Kaplan joins me today. Hi John, Hi Rachel. Persuasion impacts our sales conversation. It's a big word. Many of US may feel like persuasion is something we are doing in our sales calls, but framing it up in that way, framing it up with the goal of persuading your customers, can really steer us in the wrong direction. Ye have another great topic again. You know,...

Ron Willingham wrote a book called Integrity Selling for the twenty one century and in it he talks about persuasion and he has this great quote that we use a lot at force management. I'm just going to read it here real quickly. So the art of persuasion is the paradox. The more we attempt to persuade people, the more they tend to resist us, but the more we attempt to understand the create value for them, the more they tend to persuade themselves. So that's why we focus so much in these podcasts. You know, great conversation. So you want conversations that lead customers to their own conclusions and you don't want conversations that feel like your agenda is being forced on them. So a couple of things to the couple of takeaways. You know, the more you try to convince me, the more I'm going to resist you. But the more you ask me great discovery questions that make me understand,...

...stand in my moment of pain, understand the problem from my perspective and then have to articulate it to you, so I have to hear myself tell you about my problem, I begin to create urgency for myself to fix my problem. So I love another quote that we often say as people rarely argue with their own conclusions. People rarely argue with their own conclusions and that's your goal? Yeah, success is when customers persuade themselves. And and let's dive into that a little bit more, John. Let's go how go through how you can take your customer on that journey where they persuade themselves. Yeah, so you know, the best way to do that is to have great discovery questions and have a great flow of discovery questions. And here's a couple of ways to get conversations going. You've heard US say this before. A lot of people freak out about how do I get somebody to tell me negative thing?...

Well, interestingly enough, one of the best ways you can do it is to start with positive things, and what I mean by that is to ask them what's working well, and no doubt they'll start telling you, you know, maybe what they'd like most about their current situation, but they wind up shifting on their own. With how you doing much other than asking them what's working well to what's not working well. Everybody, we're all built with this kind of human condition, is that we're not really made to lie, and so we're uncomfortable if we're kind of giving you the wrong impression. I just wish people would take me up on this more often I have people write me email notes and stuff and on Linkedin. I get really excited when we talk about in trainings and then they go do it. They just people are fearful of being negative and the sellers are fearful of being negative. Well, the buyer is actually a little bit fearful of leading you to the wrong impression. So if you just ask them what's going well, a lot of times they'll...

...tell you what's not going well and you didn't even have to worry about how to get them to the negative. Use Conversation starters like tell me about, explained for me, described for me. We call this open ended questioning, because closed ended questions you don't get anywhere with a customer. You ask the they can answer yes or no, and then they really didn't elaborate, they didn't stand in their moment of pain. So we call these things Ted questions. Tell me about, explain for me, described for me. You know, focus on getting the customer talking. You know, then respond in a way that shows you've actively listened to what they just told you. So we have a great podcast on that by Patti Mac and Rachel. If if you haven't planned to do that already, if you wouldn't mind just linking that up in the show notes? Yeah, it's a great one. That really helps you, helps you guide the customer to their own conclusions. And, as with anything, John, we always underscore the importance of prep it can be...

...hard to prep for a conversation when you don't know what the other person is going to say. We recognize that, but I'd like you to walk through how you prepare for these types of conversations where you want the customer to lead. Yeah, I mean, ultimately I know that if I'm going to be successful, I've got to get the customer to stand in their own moment of pain. And when they stand in their own moment of pain and they mostly connect to their own moment of pain, there's a higher probability that they will create urgency to solve that pain. So, as a seller, you know the problems that you solve, you know your solutions and you know the differentiation. You want to be listening for those as triggers. You also want to have questions ready that will take you to some of the on ramps that will lead to those points. So preparation is really, really key. You know the difference. I've said before you've heard me say at the difference between stress...

...and pressures preparedness. Don't ask me a question that you could have gotten the answer to from somebody else in my organization and you get delegated to those that you sound like. So a lot of times a great way to just kind of get, you know, just prepare, is to think about I draw like three circles. I draw like a bull's eye with a bulls eye in them. So the outer circle I think about is like the industry. So even if I know nothing about this company, if I start to just focus in on what's going on at the industry level, those industry pressures create company pressures, those company pressures create departmental pressures, those departmental pressures create individual pressure. I can't tell you how many times, Rachel, I see sellers get this wrong and they go the opposite direction. They try to hit the bulls eye with an individual relationship or individual pressure and they start going a place too...

...early that they haven't earned the right to do it. So you know, that sounds really difficult. Mr Customer, you know what kind of what kind of pressures that putting on you? Or would happen if you haven't earned the right to go at the individual level back up and start. Industry Pressures Create Company pressures. Company pressures create departmental pressures. Departmental pressures create individual pressure, and that's actually lead the strategy that you should prepare for. It's a great, great way to get you to an ultimate conclusion that a customer says, you know, I'm really really struggling with that. Our departments under tremendous pressure. I'm a little bit worried or concerned about, you know, my success criteria in this role or what have you. That's a great outcome on a conversation. Unfortunately, Rachel sellers try to do the relationship thing and they try to build the relationship at the individual level before they've learned the right does that...

...make sense? Oh yeah, I think that that's a great way to go through that and I think the listeners, I'm sure all of you listening out there, are nodding your head and digging through your own bulls, I. Execution, and how you can do them good. The other part of this is in as you're leading your customer to kind of come to their own conclusions. This might take a couple of conversations. You might have a really great meaty conversation and it's always like there's that Krux move and how you're going to close it. Typically you've got your up against the clock. The person has a limited amount of time. How am I defining my next steps as I have these great conversations, I hear those triggers. I'm doing a great job. How am I making sure I close in a great way? So before the call, as part of the prep, you should always be going in with the hypothesis on what you think the best outcome would be, not only for you but for the customer. And at the start of the call I...

...always like to begin the call with Mr Mrs Customer, what does a good outcome look like for this call? And it really it's just so professional to allow people to kind of, you know, contemplate that you care about them getting a great outcome on this conversation. I've never had anybody come back to me and say that's a really stupid question. You know why did you say that? It would have so just trust that. What's a great outcome for the call, and so I work my way towards that outcome as I'm focusing on closing. For that outcome. So in the beginning I say to myself, okay, I know what I want is a great outcome for this call. I've asked a customer for what's a great outcome for this call. Throughout the course of my discovery questions and working my way through that conversation, I'm working towards that outcome. Don't worry about it if you kind of wind up at the end and you're not at the outcome. Reverse can be your best...

...friend. And the reason why I'm saying this, Rachel, is I like to fish when I'm in Florida. I like to fish on the weekends and I take boats out through a cool I don't have my own boat, but I belong to this thing called the freedom boat club and I took a guide with me just a couple of weeks ago and I always panic when I come in at the end of the day to the marina and like they got a little slip for me, like just barely enough to fit the twenty one foot boat in there. It's like twenty two beat and they want me to put this thing between two other boats and I had the guide was like I'm like hey do and things not. You do it. You got to practice this some I'm coming in and I'm work. I know what the great outcome is and I hear this little whisper right before I'm starting to come in and he said don't forget, John Reverse is your best friend, and I've I've never it's really resonating for me. So what the and I did? I started to go in a little bit and I started to reverse a little bit to...

...kind of slow my momentum down. Well, what I mean by this and why it's relevant to this conversation is I like to ask people at the end of a conversation, is there anything that we didn't talk about that you would have expected us to talk about? And I think that is a great way to end the conversation. I always ask that question. Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you would have expected us to talk about? I get great feedback. I get great interaction from customers. They appreciate it. Many times they they think about it. You know, you'd expect people to say no, I don't think there is. A lot of times people will go well, you know, we didn't talk about pricing and they'll say things like well, you know, I'm not sure you really understand the relationship between this situation in that situation, because we didn't really talk about it that much and I just love being real, I love being open and honest and just...

...being myself, and that's a great way. Try it and then give us some feedback. Is there anything we didn't talk about that you would have expected us to talk about? Give it a try. That's a good it's a great takeaway. Have you ever seen those t shirts I had, John, and say I'm sorry what I for what I said when I was parking the boat? You have to you have to send that to me in a text because they have to get that t shirt and I got to wear it or I got to give one to my wife. And because I lose my mind coming into this marina, I think about it all day I'm out there fishing and having fun and I try to time it up with when I think people aren't going to be in the marina or with that, and then that I come in and it's full, I'm like, Oh boy, here we go, here we go. All right, John, this is such an important topic persuasion. Let's wrap it up with a great bottom line. Yeah, so bottom line for me is we all know, buyers don't like to be told what to do. They like to tell you what they need and have...

...you consult with them on how to get there. You know, although buyers don't like to be told what you know to do, they are willing to be led. So you know the key is they are only willing to be led if you can take them to a place that they can't get to on their own, and you're going to need proof and evidence of that. You're going to need proof points and case studies and testimonials. Don't just use brand names to try to give them comfort that you you've been somewhere before. Tell them the story and relate that story to their story and then remember people rarely argue with their own conclusions. Get them to stand in their moment of pain. Provide them the ability to create their own urgency, because the more you tell them they have a problem, they're going to resist you. But the more you ask them great to sided discovery questions where they contemplate the answers to your question, they're learning from your question just as much as you are.

They're more compelled to create urgency to solve that problem. Give it a try. Awesome thank you so much, John. My pleasure. Thank you to all of you for listening to the Audibil ready sales podcast. At force management, we're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven methodologies deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute the growth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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