The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 3 weeks ago

Prepping Others for Your Sales Calls

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Preparing for your deal is critical. Preparing others for your sales call has equal impacts on your success. If you want someone to join you on a call (product engineer, manager, etc.), you have to be able to provide them with fluency about the deal and clarity on their role in the conversation. John Kaplan covers what information you need to share and how help ensure those joining you are best prepared.

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If you're leading a sales team,be on the lookout for wraps that have you on calls that they don't reallyneed you on, but know that you would do a really good job.You are listening to the audible ready podcast, the show that helps you and yourteam's sell more faster. will feature sales leaders sharing their best insights onhow to create a sales engine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presentedby the team at force management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let'sget started. Hello and welcome to audible ready sales podcast. I'm Rachel ClipMiller, joined today by John Kaplin. Hi, John Alli, Rachel,John. We did a podcast a few weeks ago on getting the help youneed on a deal, but today I want to talk about prepping others tohelp you on a call. This is a definite skill. Yeah, Ilove the this whole topic of preparation just reminds me of an old basketball coachused to say the difference between stress and...

...pressure is preparedness, and I foundthis to be so true. You know, pressures like one of those old,you know, weighted blankets that you can get on Amazon now. Youknow when it lays on you. It feels so nice and familiar and,you know, even comfortable. Stress, on the other hand, is brewingalso. I'm looking forward to to have an conversation with you today to feelreally, really comfortable. Yeah, let's get through that stress. So firstof all, John Is, if you want somebody to join you in thecall, you need to be able to provide your manager or whoever whoever youhave joining you, fluency on where you are in the deal. And it'sabout that information you have and sometimes, more importantly, the information you don'thave. Yeah, really, really well said. It's not a crime notto know something, but you know, it's a crime punishable by death notdoing anything about it. And so you know, even if you don't haveall the information, you should have a clear way to articulate that to yourmanager. So you know, things like...

...be prepared to talk about current stateand negative consequences, be prepared to talk about desired positive business outcomes, compellingevents that are moving them to take action, or you know, would you know, reveal timeline? So just remember, like the Uber Framework, where you'rebuilding this uber framework. Why buy anything? Why by now? Andwhy buy from me? Considering these categories. You should be clear what information wehave in what information we still need. That's a great place to start forpreparation. Yeah, and given all that information, we need to makesure everyone understands the goal for this particular call. You shouldn't be trying todo too much for the conversation. Yeah, I run into this a lot.I call it you know, stuff and ten pounds in a five poundbag. You know, you need to clearly, you know, define goalsof the call for both your team and...

...the customer. The most elite sellersalways ask customers what's a great outcome for you on the call? They eithersend that beforehand and an email, or even when they start the call,that's the first thing they're saying. This from custom what's a great outcome looklike for you? On our side, it may be to fill up thosebuckets of information we just talked about. You know, it may be toget a meeting with someone else or commitment for the next steps. You makesure everyone is clear on what you're driving to, including the customer. Yeah, the customers should know what the great outcome is for the call. Also, to John, if I'm joining the call, I want to know whatrole you want me to play. If you are a rep, you needto still own the call, but then be clear on the role that youwant others to play who are joining. I know you join a lot ofcalls, even for us here a force. John, how do you make surethat your role is defined in the call? I think this is areally critical question because I call this the...

...miracle cloud. You know, whenpreparation does not take place, you might as well write down on your notesand then a miracle happens. I'm always asking my people what do you wantmy role to be in they're really three types of answers I generally hear back. Number one is they don't know, and I'm not saying any tip ofparticular order, but one could be they don't know, which is bad becausethat's the miracle cloud. Number two is that they want me to do thewhole call for them, and the third is they've thought it out. Theythought about it, they thought what needs to happen in the call and havea line who's the best suited to do that. So, sales leaders,I want you to just listen up for a second. If you're leading asales team, be on the lookout for reps that have you on calls thatthey don't really need you on but know that you would do a really goodjob. So two things are really happening here. One is about us.You know, we're executives and we're suckers...

...for this, because most of uslove the thrill of the sales conversation or the deal, and that's typically mything. If I could be on sales calls all day versus internal process calls, I do it in a heartbeat. You know, must most of usare built that way. Some really good sellers get a little lazy on this. Instead of really thinking about the right resources for the call and who isdoing what, they're open to the leader just running the whole call. Soyou run the risk of losing your power as a seller. Think about it, if the customer just speaks to the sales leader, how hard is itgoing to be for you to reinsert yourself back into, you know, therelevance as the Rep? Think about man like. I think about like whenI buy a car and I deal with the the the sales manager, youknow, while the salesperson kind of tags along. How likely am I toaccept dealing with that seller after that initial...

...meeting the next time. So weall know what we've all been there. We're less likely to allow that tohappen. So, sellers, don't just blindly give your power away by notbeing purposeful on rolls and preparation. It's a really, really critical point.Yeah, you want to own that call. So you're sort of a simple question. When should I be bringing in more firepower, so to speak,on my calls while still owning them? Yeah, so the simple answer iswhen you really need some firepower. So so what exactly do you need tohappen on this call or meeting, and who is best suited to do it, keeping in mind what I just sat about giving up your power. Thereare situation suations where you may need subject matter expertise their situations, where youmay want to divide and conquering an account. You know, establish executives with executives, for example. I've seen sellers...

...do this really, really well.They align with coaches and champions from the customer side and they kind of siton the same side of the table and then utilize their executives on both sidesto help them accomplish outcomes. So just being very, very purposeful what youwant. That role to be and thinking it out and using it to youradvantage. I think it's again, it's really, really critical. Yeah,one piece we have we haven't talked through as it relates to this is isprep for these types of calls. All of this information that we're talking abouttoday really should be provided and clearly articulated in the prep call. That's whyyou do them. Yeah, exactly. And what I really love about ourprocess that force management, is the sellers always do a prep call or ameeting with me prior to a meeting or call, and I work on somany customer situations that this really helps me get grounded and focused on their opportunity. And you want me to be prepared...

...because, left to my own devices, I'm going to perform and you should always make sure that I'm performing ina way that you need me to perform. And you know another thing, whenI think about this, it's not just about the preparation and, youknow, getting your manager and getting, you know, doing a preparation call. I also think about like the debrief, and I felt strongly about this whenI thought about this conversation. In the best sellers always do a debrief, and notice how I said the best sellers, and I didn't say itwas the manager's responsibility. Yes, absolutely, managers should be looking to debrief andbe very, very specific on their feedback, but in this instance I'mreally talking about Reps. most selling organizations go, go, go, youknow. We don't prepare. We show up and do amazing things on salescalls and meetings and then we split right afterwards and in right after the call, without debriefing, and this has some obvious consequences. So what are thenext steps? WHO's doing? What?...

Did we hit the mark? Howdo we improve for the next time? Elite sellers, they close the loopalways with a debrief, or prep and debrief. Yeah, the underlying messagehere, John, is, is that all of this is so much easierwhen everyone is speaking the same language about a deal. Yeah, I mean, let's rehash some of that. So you know preparation is not a sometimesthing, it's an every time thing. The difference between stress and pressure isalways preparedness. What does a great outcome look like for you and the customer? Make sure you ask them. Don't get lazy and live in the MiracleCloud, expecting your leadership to show up and then you know then a miraclewill happen. And then remember what I said about giving your power away.When you do that, you know, when you do it once and yougive it away to your boss, it's hard to get it back in thecustomers eye. Some some great things to...

...think about. Thank you for joiningme for the conversation, John. You got it, go get it.Yeah, I got some calls to go prep for. Well, we'll seeyou all later. Thank you for listening to the audible ready sales podcast.At force management, we're focused on transforming sales organizations into elite teams. AreProven methodologies deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Giveyour teams the ability to execute the growth strategy at the point of sale.Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's getstarted. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible readypodcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favoritepodcast player. Until next time,.

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