The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode 72 · 6 months ago

Skill and Will: Your 3s and 4s

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Continuing our series on the “Skill/Will” Model (link to the diagram below), this episode covers people with high will, level 3s and 4s. High-will talent are the people you want to have on your team, they’ll improve your ability to succeed and maintain competitive advantage in your market. This episode shares what you can do to keep and leverage your level 4s (high will, high skill) and how you can help your level 3s (high will, low skill) become top performers as well.

Here are some additional resources on Skill/Will:

The Skill/Will Model Infographic [Diagram]

https://bit.ly/3ftMTDS

The Skill/Will Model Explained [Article]

https://bit.ly/3hP2X6h

Four Questions Every Sales Organization Needs to Answer

https://bit.ly/3c3jfnz

Check out this and other episodes of The Audible-Ready Podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website. 

Everybody has a story. Your jobis to be in tune with your people stories. You're listening to the audibleready podcast, the show that helps you and your team's sell more faster.Will feat your sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a salesengine that helps you fuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team at force management, a leader in BTB sales effectiveness. Let's get started. Hello and welcometo the audible ready sales podcast. I'm Rachel Clup Miller, joined byJohn Kaplan. Hi John, Hey Rachel. Excited to continue the series. Yes, we are continuing our series on the skill will model. Last weekwe spoke about the overall importance of using something like the skill will model tohelp you categorize the people on your team and manage those people, meet themwhere they are. If you haven't listened to that episode and Are Unfamiliar Withwhat the skill will model is, hip pause, go take ten minutes,go to the episode we published last week,...

...listen to that first and then comeback here. Today we're going to dive into what we call the levelthrees and fours. These are your people with high will. Level threes havethat low skill, but they still have the high will. They want tothey want to do a good job. Level fours are your top players rightyour high will, high skill. We're going to keep repeating those characteristics sothat you can keep it straight in this conversation that I know most of youaren't sitting there with this diagram in front of you. You're listening at thegym or in your car or what you're doing. John, I'm sure someof our listeners, let's just ground here, are wondering why we're starting this breakdownwith the threas and force and not the ones into so, yeah,it's a really, really good question and if you caught that, I'm reallyproud of you out there, if you're listening. So if you're asking,why do there's? It's one, two, three, four, why are westarting with threeason four? So Hi will, if you remember, thethrees and fours have high will, and...

...for me, high will people arethe people that we have to have on our teams. My philosophy has alwaysbeen if you are on my team and you give me great attitude and greatbehavior, you get my leadership first you earned it. That's a great wayto great way to think about that. So let's start with these number fours. These are high will, high skill. Why we paying attention to them,John? Because they can. They can do it without us. Right. Well, yeah, that's the that's a really, really important statement.You said they can do it without us, so we should all be so luckyto have a team full of, you know, level force. Theseare high achievers and we need to delegate to them and promote them. Sothere are a whole lot of things that leaders do wrong with these people,but the biggest mistake is to leave them alone while you deal with other problemsin the organization, and this is how we lose great talent. A lotof times people stay. Somebody surprised us. Can you believe that level four theyleft? Or what happened? You...

...really dig into it. They hadbeen leaving for a while and we'll dig into that a little bit more.But how many of you've been a level for before and your company just leftyou alone? You know, there's an old saying a rolling stone gathers nomoss, so being left alone sounds like gathering moss to me. So thebest thing you can do with a level for is to get them involved withothers on the team, especially the level threes. Yeah, I want totalk about that. I just want to make a comment on what you said. If you think about many of you listening have been level fours before atyour company, and think about that own mindset that you're in is as maybepeople didn't your managers didn't pay attention to you, and that's going on,could be going on for those level fours on your team right now. Sogo ahead on I was just going to say to follow up on what yousaid. As you're going through this exercise, you can also do it is putyourself in these categories. So we're going to ask you to assess yourpeople, but when you put yourself in...

...this you know assess yourself where youpersonally are in your organization. That's also an eye opening experience. So don'thesitate to do that as we go through these examples. Yeah, and,and you said it in the earlier episode, it's a moment in time right wecan, we can shift around, especially when it comes to our will, so to speak exactly. But you mentioned the best thing you can dowith the level for is to get them involved with your level three. Thoselevel threes are the people who have the will but don't necessarily have that highskill. So we want the force to help coach the three. So whatam I doing as a manager to get those fours, those people with highwill high skill, involved with the threes who maybe don't have the skill?Yeah, so with a lot of level force, they are expecting to getpromoted, as they should be. You know, you should be thinking aboutways to promote your level force. And some people get turned around on thiswhen they say, well, you know, I don't have an opportunity for themto be the next leader. Would...

...have. It's not always promotion doesn'talways mean like to the next role. Promoting can be highlighting and and pullingthem out and that type of stuff is like that's also a definition of promotion. But they to be clear. They are expecting to get promoted. Itas they should be. But many times organizations don't prepare people well to leadothers. And I remember a time for me when I was a level fourand I was, you know, a little frustrated with how long it wastaking for me to get promoted. When I brought it up to my manager, they said, John, if you want the next job, act likeyou already have it. I'm going to repeat that. If you want thenext job, act like you already have it. And some of the greatestadvice that I've ever received. So when I press my leader to tell meexactly what that meant for me, they gave me the opportunity to mentor otherson the team Whoa what an experience that was. I was great at doingmy job, but not great at explaining...

...why I was good at my joband how that would help you, if you I was mentoring you, howthat would help you learn how to do it like me. So one ofthe best things you can do with level fours is to get them involved withthe level threes and don't just assume that they're automatically going to know how todo that. There's some great learning and development in that practice of helping connectlevel fours and level threes. Great. So let's shift now to those threes. What am I doing here? So level threes are your diamonds in therough. These are the people that are, you know, typically eager new hireswho have strong will but low skill as it relates to kind of whatyour company does. So I've seen busy leaders fall into the level three trap. You know, as leaders were always pressed for time and as a result, the development of our UPAND commers falls by the wayside. In fact,the most common post attrition thing I hear leaders say about their former level threesis, I always thought that I had...

...a little more time. You know, some level threes don't wait around for their absent leaders to lead them,so they look for others. You know, think about it, if you're lookingfor leadership, you don't look side ways, you look up. Andif your level fours are not involved with the team, the only people thatthey will see when they look up is a level to high skill, butlow will attitude, behavior person and you can instantly imagine what bad outcomes canhappen here. Bad behaviors and attitudes from level two's can easily and quickly ruboff on level threes. This can be catastrophic for your organization. Right.It's like a virus, right. Yes, yes. So how do I,as a manager, I know some of you listening out there thinking,thinking through this. How do I, as a manager, get my levelthrees to level force? Yeah, I...

...mean first we make sure that wehave very good development plans in place. As a company. You have tomake sure that the what and the how of the job are clearly defined.This is the skill part of the job and for the will part of thejob, I like to always start with the why. Why does what wedo matter? Make sure you have the four cential questions nailed. What problemsam I solving for my customers? How specifically do we solve those problems?How do we solve them differently or better than anybody else, and where havewe done it before? Next, pair them with great level for mentors toshow them how the job is done and help them understand the good, badand ugly about the INS and outs of the job. This helps them geta very realistic view of the skill in action. That's great to let's wrapit up, John. Give us some spirit around managing this part of theskill. Will model those frees and forces people with high wells but varying skills. So, first of all, I...

...consider this the best part of myjob, coming to work in the morning, working with people with great attitudes andgreat behaviors. It just motivates me to be the very best as aleader that I can be. You know, if you give me a great effortwith your attitude and behavior, you do the things we're asking you todo, no matter what your success and execution you have. For the timebeing, for sure you get my very best attitude and behavior as a leader. So remember you, as a manager, do not have to have the verybest in the skill sets. You have level force, and so youyou know that's a tough reality for some people that, like I'm not thebest at asking discovery questions or I'm not the best at negotiating, but thereare people around you that probably are the best and I always, always lookto level force who can help me and help themselves in their own leadership development. At the same time, don't be...

...too proud to go to a levelfor and ask them for help and mentoring a level three. It can besometimes some of the greatest leadership actions that you'll take. Yeah, and Ithink the other bottom line that you set at the at the top. Youdon't want to leave any of these players alone. Never yeah, everybody hasa story, which we're going to talk about next week. Everybody has astory. Your job is to be in tune with your people. Stories.Love that, all right. So, as John said, we've given youthe overview, the model. We broke down threason for us today. Nextweek we're going to talk about the ones and twos. These are the peoplewith the low will on your team. You might have some you're dealing withright now. Join join us for the podcast next Tuesday. Will break breakthat down for you. Thank you for joining me for the conversation, John, my pleasure. All right, and thank you to all of you forlistening to the audible ready sales podcast. At force management we're focused on transformingsales organizations into elite teams. Are Proven...

...methodologies deliver programs that build company alignmentand fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute the growthstrategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. The proofis in our results. Let's get started. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You'vebeen listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribeto the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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