The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 1 month ago

The Brandon Burlsworth Story

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you want to be "the top 2%", become an elite seller in your organization, and propel your career to the next level — take spirit from Brandon Burlsworth's UnCommon story. Sales leaders, share it with your sales reps and managers.

Told in the movie Greater, Brandon's life was one of grit, dedication and hard work. But, he didn't start out that way. He started out as a young player, with a big goal, not unlike most sales athletes. Brandon went from a walk-on freshman football player at the University of Arkansas to become a 1st-Team All American, who was drafted into the NFL by the Indianapolis Colts. It's speculated that just 2% of all football players make it into the NFL. Hear the story to see how you can be greater every day.

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Brandon had an incredible impact, notonly for himself with his focus and drive and determination, but he alsohad an impact on those around him. You're listening to the audible, ready,podcast, the show that helps you and your teams sell more faster willfeature sales leader sharing their best insights on how to create a salesengine that helps you feel repeatable revenue growth presented by the team Fforce management, a leader in PB sales effect. In this let's get started hello, I'm Rachel Capillar with forcemanagement. Thank you for joining us for this episode of the audible, readysales podcast and what an episode it is. We love using sports analogies of forceand the reason we do is because they're often a great example of people workingtowards a common goal, overcoming obstacles, trusting the process, etc.All the things we as sales people are trying to do every day. So today, aspecial story for you, it's the story of Brandon Bolswart. You may know it.It's featured in a movie called Creator that you can find now on. Netflixbrandon was a walk on for the University of Arkansas football team. AWakan who went on to be awarded a scholarship he won all SEC offensiveguard, one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven in one thousand ninehundred and ninety eight all conference honors and was named first team, allAmerican. He was a third round draft pick by the Indianapolis Colts. If youthink about that trajectory, it's really amazing and a tribute to hischaracter and work ethic. Tragically, ten days after the draft, he was killedin a car accident on his way home from school to attend church with his mombrandon's brother Marty was sixteen years older than Brandon and was verymuch a father figure to him. Now, Marty and Marty's wife Vicky carry on hislegacy by heading up the Brandon Burlsh Foundation, they're, both featured inthat movie greater they're, committed to helping kids in need, you'll hearabout their work. In this episode, John Caplin talks with Marty and Vicky aboutBrandon's legacy his commitment to be greater and how uncommon he was. Ithink, you'll enjoy the conversation here. We go. It's my great pleasure tointroduce to our listening audience Marty and Vicky Burlsh, the family ofthe legend, Brandon burs worth the greatest walk on in college footballhistory just to just a great honor to speak with you both today and I'mreally really looking forward to our conversation. Thank you for being herewith us. Thank you make John that's it's ourhonor pleasure to be here, fantastic, fantastic, hey, so I was introduced to Brandon's legacy. Actually I remember Brandon in I believe it was.Is it ninety nine when Michigan Play Arkansas in the was it the citrus bowlcitroon Orlando in the citrus bowl, and he was an absolute dominant force? Iremember hearing his story. I just remember him from back then and thenthe movie. I got a phone call from my brother, Joe, and he said: Hey. Haveyou seen this movie about the greatest walk on and college football history,and I couldn't remember Brandon's name at the time and, and he said, hey it'son Netflix. By the way the the movie is called Greater and it's on Netflix.It's a must see for the folks we're going to dig into it on this podcastand and really talk about kind of Brandon's legacy. It's an unbelievablypowerful story, but my brother called me said: Have you seen the movie and Iand I said well, I remember the guy and then, when I watched the movie and sawthe legacy unfold and and the tragic ending it just really really hit home,and we just reached out to you folks...

...and said We'd love to have you on ourpodcast and and really talk about Brandon's legacy. So the so. The firstquestion that I have for you a mardy is you know you have been really out there,keeping Brandon's legacy and memory alive. Why was it important foryou to to make sure that others knew Brandon story? Yeah? That's that's areally good question! John! I mean brandon works so hard for so long. Imean I've. I remember this little guy trying to play baseball wasn't a verygood athlete. I coached him as he got a little bit older. I was a junior highbaseball coach just in the summer, nothing professional, but I had my teamthat I'd had for years and I knew the struggles I mean not just me, ourfamily people on our home town of Harrison, Arkansan new to struggles,new, the crows and all the you know everything he went through. I and youknow after his tragic accident at through the NFL draft, and we justcouldn't let that end right at that time. He had done too much and beensuch a great role model not only for kids, but you know for everyone forjust a you know, tremendous can do attitude and believing in yourself andhaving your having a strong faith and been working hard. So we were there onthe you know when it when it was all taking place all through those yearsand we just could o let it end. We're really really thankful that you didn'tlet it end and I just think with Brandon Story. I don't think if itwould have ended. I think that his legacy was meant to go on and on and onand and Vicki on that note, you work with the Brandon burs worth foundationand you'RE A big party. Both are a big part of that. But Vicky, like yourperspective, on what do you think most resonate for folks with Brandon Story.From your point of view, he question. I think one of the things is that thatBrandon, we all need a role model. We just need somebody to look up to, andsometimes you want that Rome all that you canhave your children look up to, but brandon came from. You know strugglingand and overweight when he was younger and he just decided in him his will andhis faith that he was going to transform himself, and I think any ofus want to think that tomorrow is going to be a better day and we need to getour act together and get back in our faith and that we can change to be thatperson that we want to be in Brandon. Did that so to me, he's just an exampleto everybody of somebody that that was the ultimate. I can do it that you knowhe didn't put his head. lites circumstances determine what he wasgoing to do. Yeah I heard a quote. I don't know if it came from Brandon orwas about Brandon, nothing given everything earned and when you thinkabout for our listeners, you know worldwide listeners he's known as thegreatest walk on in college football history. Then let me just explain whatthat means. What that means is in college athletics. There are atAthletic Scholarships and the story goes that Brandon was born and raisedto play for Arkansas into. He wanted to be a member of the Razor Back ArkansasRazor back football team, and he wanted that ever since that he was a littleboy and he decided he's a late bloomer. So I'm going to ask you a little bitabout that Marty in just a second but he's a late bloomer, so there were noscholarships available. I want you to think about that. Everybody else isgetting recruited to a school to a company to what have you and you're,not one of them. That's getting recruited to your ideal place that youwant to go to, and it wasn't that Brandon wasn't a good football player.There are plenty of places for him to be able to use his talents, but he wasso focused and determined that he decided to walk on, which means join afootball team without an athletic scholarship and the rest is- and he didthat at Arkansas and the rest is just...

...in an an incredible story. So Marty,what I'd like to talk a little bit about, will kind of break this downinto kind of four segments. You know. Brandon's determination is impact onothers from a coaching point of view, since you have kind of a coachingbackground and you interacted with their with the coaches and then we'lltalk about you know Vicky the legacy. That's that's really been created inthe beautiful job that you all are doing with the foundation and Brandon'slegacy. But let's, let's dig in a little bit to the determination andfocus and desire and Mardi. I believe that you were you're the older brother,your Brandon's, older brother and there's a significant kind of agedifference and in looking at the story, how really blessed I think Brandon wasto have you in his life as the father figure, and would you mind just kind oftalking about the focus, the desire, the resiliency, the late bloomer justtell us a little bit about Brandon's early life right yea. He I mean as a wespeak. You to youth groups are elementary schools. I always stressed ahem that randoms just like anyone else. He wasn't a future all a marriage, andat that time you didn't see that at all you didn't see an athlete at all.Really you didn't. You really didn't see that work ethic or we on I justlike any kid. He was basically you know he would make it excuses for why Istruck out or I'm striking out. You know something somebody else is poked,so he and I would have those talks, and I would tell him I said as long thisthis is you know when he's ten or eleven years old, so you know keepingthat good sideration ever as long as long as it. Somebody else is falled,that's not going to get any better. None of that age. He really. I don'tthink that he didn't want to hear that you know too much a way o when he gotup old enough to be on my baseball team thirteen through fifteen year year old,but he would always come out and practice with this one place a littlechunky. I wanted to run sprints with us after practicing he did and he did, andthat was a work ethic there. He started getting more determined and I don't Ido not think any creative whatsoever for what he became, but when he got upinto our Lee or in our age group, he knew that. I would just tell him sayyou know you're going to have to do right either. When is a little way,we're going to lose a little weight, we're going to work out or I want to go,we won't play. I never play very much upon the next game, always lost a waywork hard. That Nicky remembers many nights with the in our driveway, withthe car lights on and I'm catching him, and he we're trying to make a pictureout of him and, and he say in baseball- and you know, I've got a breakdown inmechanics and change them. Get you some good mechanics cosme mechanic, for hehad no conic. So we did have to worry about any of that there were. We had aclean slate that we he worked just really put in I mean we would be outthere freezing temperatures all year long and then, by the next year he madeall star team and made the world series team as a picture and baseball wasreally big. That was, as always been my favorite sport that was actuallybrandons that would like football to, but around that time, once he you know,you can see the work at that kicking in, and I didn't. I didn't have to push himwhen he was the little guy I has really just like it is in the movie when thelawns not mow people ask. Is that really a that's? That was real becausehe just be set sitting on the couch eating tips or laying in the floor, andI thought man, you know I guess it. I felt like a nine year old told you know,have some type of work at thick. I don't know why. I I guess at that time. I kneweverything, but I didn't, but he sure showed me so what's amazing about hisstory, though, is in your all story is...

...that you know Brandon, I think brandongrowing up in a you know a difficult environment and- and you know certainlywasn't given a lot, but you know, was surrounded by love, which is an awesomepart of the story, and you guys played a big part of that, but he's growing upkind of a kind of a normal kid and then something happens. Is There Vicky youwatch this and you watch the interaction with Marty and Brandon? Isthere anything that you can remember is like something that flipped a switch for him,something that changed from an intense motivation and desire? Is thereanything you guys can put your fingers on on that one and we go back and lookabout it because he is all inspiring to us as he isn't the rest of the world.We just got to live with him and and be around him twenty four seven, but hewas always wonderful, mom one from mom dad wasn't around this much alcoholic,a great guy. You would love him comedian if he's passed on now, but butyou know just it wasn't there and so when he started getting involved inchurch. You kind of start seeing that mine, and I remember one time: We'd hadhim and thou at my mother's house and and he had had, was chewing out. Ithink he was probably maybe six or seven, and I said Brannan. Would Godwant you to do that and you could just see his mind working and he stopped. Imean he just really understood that his faith was starting to develop. You knowthose early years and then later on. As far as football is concerned, his bestfriend was invited to the Ulster game and so ran went to there, and I thinkthat is when it kicked in that he wanted to do that. You know that hisbreath best riend was a year older, and so you know, I think it's just like therest of us. Things happen that to me wouldn't have made any effect, but tobrain it into the stage that where he was at in his life right, then that wasthe pivot that God needed to push in towards where he wanted him to be. HMM.How about you Marty? Yeah, I mean that's, that's that's true when he wasattended at first high school, All Star game for his friend that that thatkicked it in, but you know I think it did a lesson to learn from this isyoung brand. It came from very, very humble beginnings. I think we all looksometimes, for you know I a head start and what so inspired that Brandon storyis. You know there was no head start. There was no became, you know with just really withit about very little chance of making it you know, but for a lot of us wouldwould make us want to quit. I will out quit, but you know I do I don't havethe scholarship or whatever that might be of whatever career were in. You know,someone's got a pet start on me, so you know i'onin gonna now it in a d, butnot not with the not the brain and it just, but he had a big gross spark thepoint his stopmore in junior year in high school. Now, when i have a headedwith into baseball all the time, i didn't see that and i was with and weweren't the same household, but we were with him all the time we didn't noticeit till he got. This was before you worked out all summer like high schoolstudent. Yeah part. You know you in the wait room all summer where it wasn'tthat way back in the arimanes, but here's a high school coach, tommy taskcall my sadi said: what have you been feeding that boy and that s? A what doyou mean said he's grown three or four inches this summer. Oh i didn't. Ididn't notice that so, but also it that sometimes seem like something mentallywith brandon clicked to on physical growth that a nital broth and a vision he had a be. I think football is icould you know maybe continue to play outside of high school now that wouldhe didn't play for me any he stood on sideline this sopore year junior yearplay time with a senior. Now he was a high school senior. Seventeen years,graduated high school seventeen years old, yeah his senior year and i've goneback and looked at a lot of film and i...

...did the seman. I know he was dominie.You go back you like by the both sides of the ball, but you had you had togain plan on the other side because and then he'd still run you down so yeahask- and this was someone that you know two three years earlier never saw thefield and was the main area uncoordinated, but just worked himselfjust putting in the word when you know when i want to look in no glory there,but that's yeah were gains are made. It's amazing story because when youlook at he's like the classic example of a late bloomer- and i love his storybecause, like in today in high school athletics- and you know these kids aredeclaring now in the eighth grade- and you know they're getting scholarshipsin the eighth and ninth grade a and you just have people that are latedevelopers and i had forgotten that brandon was a he graduated as a seniorat like seventeen years old, and so let's talk about, he shows up atarkansas his dream and you know arkansas was you know they were theykind of had a plan with the people that they recruited and and they allowed himto come and walk on and and so now he's there and one thing that struck me in the storyand i'd like to talk a little bit about impact. So brandon had an incredibleimpact, not only for himself with his focus and drive and determination, buthe also had an impact on those around him and the story did the movie greateron netflix. I highly highly recommend it for those that are listening. It dida really really good job of kind of the impact that brandon had on those aroundhim, and i know marty and vicky you've known his teammates for probably acouple of decades now and and just describe a little bit of what you guyswitnessed and what you hear, those people that lined up and played withbrandon. So in the beginning he comes out he's out of shape, not not out ofshape, but not in ready shape to compete at a major university in one,probably the toughest competitive level in college football and the sec, and sopeople are kind of looking at that maybe like. Why is this kid here andthen in a very short period of time he earns a scholarship in his first yearand in a very short period of time. He is not different. He if people aremigrating towards him. So you tell me your experiences of hearing the storiesof how people kind of migrated towards the humility and the difference thatthat brandon was displaying that yeah. He i mean he very quiet and we talkedabout. He came in out of shape. Basically, that's correct. He was toldin recruiting business at least were recruiting visits that maybe i had hadto make a phone tall to get the visit, but they did it vitus over and took ittook an interest in him that it was going to be as vitally is going to be awalk, come and then a bichwas, a prepared, walk home and he was toldjust like it says in the movie that you're not big enough, and so once again he grew, but that was in thewrong way. He gained weight, but it wasn't not the right kind of way doremember that summer. He and i would go to white room a lot, but he was youknow he was just putting on the wrong kind of weight, and i once again i didnot realize that would, since i was within a lot coach times before heshowed up or went over to favel arkansas home to the university ofarkansas said well, he solved and i didn't know what he's going to set anhe's going away and is yeah. He want. They said that he's that's another kindof what they wanted so to okay so- and i didn't even notice it so when overand was challenged by the coaching staff that he had to get that that waythat he put on off, and that was a struggle. I remember me any time italked to him every night at ten...

...minutes after ten, and he said i'm onthe what the trainer called green label in the but basically eating salads yeah waywell on it. You can eat it other other than that. No, so that wasn't a lot offun, but not everything's, but what's amazing about storys, they told themsaid. If you want to play here, you got to show up and be over three hundredpounds, and so he listens to exactly what they told them to do. They didn'ttell them how to put the three on it's not like you cut cut in the corner,he's like okay. I got to be three hundred pounds. What i love about hisstory, though, is they said? Okay, then he shows up. He says i did what youtold me to do and for coaches listening and for business coaches listening youdon't only have to tell somebody what you need them to do. You got to makesure they know how to do it, and then you got to keep in communication withthem to make sure that it's going correctly, and so he shows up. I thinkthe number i don't know twenty or you know twenty or thirty pounds with thewrong body makeup and the kid says: okay, they tell them, you got to changeit, you got to lose the weight and then put it back on muscle and the kid doesit. So he did everything that they told them to do exactly yeah and just thinkabout that- and i really have it looked at it exactly like that john before,but he could have said right then, were you told me put the way dog? I did itand now that's not good enough. That's not the way. You know he would do whathis coaches ask of him, because he believed in his coaches. He trusted hiscoaches and coached. Tonlets is high school coach, told the coaches at theuniversity quite before he arrived said what make sure, whatever you tell him, that's what you want done because hewill do it they'll do what you say but make sure it's exactly what you want todo, because if you say take a two and a half inch step on on a drill, it'sgoing to be two and a half. If you want three, you better say three he's goingto be precise about going back to the wait thing he could have got,discourage right there and then said. Well, i'm done you know he told me toput the waitin, but he did not listen to this coach, just tuck it off andthen transfer and set up within a year and was going to be totally differentin fact, he's looking back about a year later, any of the photos we've got himaround that time period before he went to the university mom would have themout, like the displace high school graduation he's like put that away. Hedid not like the way he looked. He was fine with it at the time, but once hehad transformed he's like no, i don't like the way. I look on a little, i'mcareful in quite what we share on our social media and other things. I keephim in mind because i know if some of those follow me an i be too crazy about,so we don't. We don't put. He he's a big old boy, but it's so so. Let's stay on this topic ofcoaches. I know that in the movie there were wonderful stories and you can'tyou can't make them all. You can't get them all in a movie, but he was justblessed a beginning with you guys and his mother to have just greatinfluences in his life, but the coaches that showed up the high school coaches,the college coaches and then the big theme that i really really saw was wehave this concept that we talked about a force. Management of great leadersand great coaches have the ability to meet people wherever they are, andthere are some examples of coaches that brandon had which met him wherever hewas and brandon was willing to put in the work they were willing to do thework with him. You know, above and beyond what the other people were doingand he's like the classic example of a diamond in the rough and so diamonds inthe rough they have to be harvested. They have to be polished, and i wasreally struck in the story and brandon story. But there were some greatexamples, and i know they were a conglomeration of many coaches and thatkind of stuff, but he was pretty blessed to have people really noticedthat he was different, and i know that...

...was he brought it to the table becausehe was different. He was humble. He was an incredible worker, but you know inlife and in business, sometimes that doesn't always get noticed and forcoaches out there and leaders out there. I want you to listen as marty and vickyjust talk about some of the impactful coaches and brandon's life. That reallysaw the diamond in the rough and helped him take it to the next level. Can youguys comment on that very when, if one of brandon's best friends, one of thelinemen, said that he it bothers him that he does not remember random thefirst year? Isn't that something so he's really this giant thateverybody and then they're, one of the linemen who turns out to be as one ofhis best friends doesn't remember, and he was so quiet and putting in the workand and doing it behind the scenes and wasn't looking for attention or tryingto get position himself. He was just focused and bicky. Thatgives me, goose,bumps one of his best friends says he doesn't remember him. Somebody who goeson and becomes a two time sec. All sec player becomes the first team allamerican and gets drafted in the third round. That just gave me chill bumpsone of his best friend says. I don't remember him as a freshman, which means he completely transformedhimself and we miss things if we're not looking for them. Just like the country,you got to look for, expect good things that are some people, because they'regoing to surprise you wow that just gave me chill bumps.Maybe chill bumps marty your comments about some of the coaches yeah brandonhad i mean blessed to have a lot of great coaches. A we've talked to talkedabout for john, but he's one thing about it. You know when they reallytook the brain and one thing he obviously wasn't. The big talker superhumble that when you see someone that's willing to put in the work, even whenit's not paying off here in arkansas those that aren't you familiar with therazor backs, we have no professional teams in arkansas, we haven't anotherdivision, one school in the state and other than that. We've got smallerschools, but raiser max or everything raise back. It's a state wide pride.There's this any other sole. It's a that's a one state school! I mean it'sjust that's! That's it everything razor back! You can be at smaller schools onthe weekend. Maybe you've got a spot in at one of the smaller schools and wewere university last week and talking about this and the talk in the stands,if the pods are playing at the same time, people in stand what's a score. What'sa score, even though they're at another game, they want to know, keep up withit with that razor back score, but you know just back to brain at work at think. Whenyou see someone willing to sacrifice for for no glory at all coach houstonnut what he arrived on campus- and i remember him- telling the story aboutoff seven workouts are ye off season work outs going to the weight room, youknow in arkansas. You know everyone's got their battle cry, but we we callthe halls lupi. So we call the hogs and one mind that stuck out to me said:there's not there's not too many people calling the hogs at five thirty in themorning in the weight room, yeah an that's pretty powerful right there. Iremember not getting any result were not in any glory, but men were workingso that he, you know that day will come so marty when i first met you and vickyone of the stories that i just absolutely fell in love with, and iwanted to ask if it was true, because i know hollywood's got to do some thingsto condense topics and- and you know, keep people's attention which i didn'tthink was at all necessary in brandon story. It turned out not to benecessary. So there's one story that i really love. New coach comes in houston,not the previous coach, the they just made a coaching change. Houston nutcomes into the field house at you know...

...i don't know at what it's dark. So it'sit's after everybody is gone and he saw brandon in there working on histechnique and he didn't really know brandon that well yet, and so he's likehey who's in here and how did you get in here and- and so you know, brandonask for you know permission to be able to do that in houston. Nut goes downand talks about that in the impact. This is the part that i really loved.So the coach, the new leader came in had a decision and probably said, heylook. I got a couple o years to rebuild here, so i can go with the younger guys,and this was big impact for me when i was thinking about business. Brandonwas so impactful to others around him. That houston not saw that. So. First ofall, he had a first hand experience with him after hours like it like atnight, when all the lights were off in the field house, and then he had aconversation with brandon about brandon, saying, hey, let us finish what westarted and houston nuts getting paid a lot of money he's got a plan to come inhe's a new leader and the new and the leaders. I want you to just listen tothis see. What's on the ground, see the leaders, the the players that are onthe ground, see the positive. Where are your pockets of influence of positivityand resilience and brandon was one of those and then they show they cut tothe next scene. I don't want to give too much of the movie away, but thisreally impacted me and then brandon's, leading the juniors and seniors and inthe first day of practice- and you could tell houston nuts mine was justlike okay, we're going to go with these we're going to let them finish whatthey started and that almost never happened so marty. Would you just kindof comment on that? In that situation, where a coach comes in has a plan toprobably do somethingbringing his own recruits or what have you looks on theground, looks at the ground level sees an incredible talent and incredibleleader and decides to partner with that leader and make great things happen.Yeah exactly, and i mean he had every opportunity, because you got anoffensive blind or offensive line going into that year for that next season,four out of the five or seniors they were going into the third year ofstarting that'd, be a no grand garret chat, abernathey, brandon and rustlebrown. These guys were that i mean everyone knew that we were right on thecust of really being good the year before. I can understand why they wouldlook at changing, because we were right near the end that it's very boden andrushing yards, which that's an e insult to an offensive. Linemen yeah it. Youcan't run the ball so to me: you're, not very physical, but you knowcoaching at stall what he had there and that's all that what like brandon waswhat he came from and the impact and the influence that he had on his teammates not only on his teammates. But you know all the all the coaches, and imean one of any player out there knows that that's listening, that's played,you know, college football most and there's not very many that are favor ofa coaching, chanons and brandon, and that team was my favorite coach. Fordwas the head coat at the time, and that is just almost there. I mean when thisteam was going to be good, but we'd had to back to back four and seven seasons.You just can't continue that and but coach broil on you or a long time,legendary athletic director at arkansas. You know really did a great job ofbringing heston and i was excited about it once he got here. But i just likeeverybody else. You know you want to we. We know we're right at the just rightthere about to make things happen, but i don't cottet took what he had to quit.Those guys they put in all here of work and they knew want to know that wasthat offensive blind was tightened it...

...they knew they didn't have to. Theydidn't have to verbalize anything when to bollene. They knew one another'stendencies and work as a unit so and to that's a great story i think, and thenthey went on to in the next two years. I don't they competed for the secchampionship. They won one of them right or do they win to? We won thelast yeah. We went. We won the west a couple of times and when had for thewest that randon senior year and have just a cause of just terrible terriblegame at tennessee and not a terrible mepot the game, we should have won thatisn't now in the legendary arcis of the sec, and they will replay that game thein network here and i try not to watch it. Hey, i'm a michigan fan. So i'm rightthere with you on i'm right there with you on some of those disappointments,but so okay. So, let's just recap a couple of things: coaches and leadersthat are out there when you first, you know, get your assignment to go in andtake over a new team. You get called in to turn around this team. Most peoplemake plans without even meeting the players without even understandingwhat's on the ground, and you could miss an opportunity to see a potentialfuture, all american and an nfl draft pick and have that person kind of helpand partner with you to just in enforced management terms. We call thatlevel four players level. Four players have a massive impact on those aroundthem and then, if you are a player, if you are a an employee and you'relistening to this story, i want you to think about brandon's impact. A newcoach comes in and brandon just kept doing what he was doing, offered hisability to be a great impact, a great influence for the new coaching staff tobe a help to the new coaching staff. You're, not powerless. If there's acoaching shift or a leadership shift, if you're doing the right things,things will be, things will be noticed. So all right, so vicky i'd like toshift years a little bit and one of the things that we really love to do onthis audible, ready podcast is this story just really really touched. Ourheart brandon story is an incredible story. Your stories of the way that youare keeping brandon's legacy alive and what you're doing for others is justawesome and we're talking about brandon bors worth the most famous and greatestwalk on and college football history. They now have a burls worth trophy andsome incredible names like baker, mayfield and several others that are inthe nfl. This is an award. That's given out every year, nothing giveneverything, earned mentality. Brandon went from walkon the two time, all sec,first team, all american in a third round draft choice for the colts. Whati also love is that in that time- and i believe he is the onwas at the time-the only razor back football player that earned his master's degree beforehis final game and that, just when i read that, i think i read that a coupleof days ago, i'm like but of course, but of course, what a what an absoluteincredible human being. Let's shift gears a little bit and talk about thefoundation dicky. Would you tell us a little bit about the foundation andwhat you all have been doing to keep brandon's legacy alive? Brandon is nolonger here due to a tragic situation which actually made me cry, i'm fiftyeight years old and i watch movies, and you know that one that one made me cryand let's talk a little bit about the legacy and the foundation brandon borswork. That org is where you can find information about the foundation rachelwill put in the show note, the link will actually have a landing page whichwill link right to the foundation. Let's dig into really what's mostimportant is the legacy that brandon created and what you guys are all doingwith the foundation. So bicky tell us...

...about it. It won't surprise you at allto know that marty and brandon had already spoke about when he knew thatthe nfl was probably going to be a real possibility. They had already talkedabout helping children with with the money that he had. He knew that hewould make some difference brand already had sand. Have conversationsabout. You know helping others in the nfl. You know they always have thegroups of the fa players bring the groups of children to help them. Youknow patman in that that's just really common, and so we they already talkedabout the idea of what we now call the burros kids, which is probably whatwe're more famous for just because we bring underprivileged children atarkansas reader about games and to any netlist coke games so that that was aneasy thing and then football camps. You know we wanted to kind of get thosebrandon's friends together, so that we, you know a lot of this- was it was allin randa's memory, but it was out of our grief that we had to running tocall it sacher swim. You know first, the first year was tough and the moviekind of shows the what happened that weekend. That was probably more ourfirst year. We don't really struggled on how, as we've lived for this child,you know we gone to martini, went to every game and this barber them onevery game. We missed two in four years i mean we just had lived with thesefamilies and the players and what happened so the burs kids, and then werealized that that brain was so well known for those glasses. And so that'swhat we're really passionate about our summer push is to get our usbandchampion where we go in, and kids in school that don't have insurance, don'thave means to do it, but are still trying they're still. You know theydon't have government a they're trying the families are trying, but so thosekids in arkansas. We put glass on about a thousand children a year through oureyes of the champion program, and we want to push that out we're now inlouisiana and we're trying to push that out nationwide. So that's i love that.I love that and if you get a chance, google, a picture of brandon there's astory about how he was having some struggles in a game and they got a pairof glasses for him and he didn't have a lot of money to be able to you know,and he asked me to get you know designer glasses, but he had to get theglasses also to be able to withstand the contact. They're probably be themost famous athletic pair of glasses. Today, they're the thick black rim,glasses and- and you know, six foot four three hundred and ten pounds wouldjust knock your lights out wearing those glasses. It's just one of myfavorite things about brandon, but to our audience to look they're. Seventyfive percent of all people that are listening to this are wearing some typeof corrective lenses, and so we would like to just you know, put a bug outthere. We love doing these podcast because we also point you in thedirection of some wonderful foundations, because we know our community is reallyinterested in serving others. And so can you talk a little bit more, the onethat you guys have a big push on right now. It's called the eyes of a championin the concept and some of the things that people can do. Obviously you candonate and you can donate pair of glasses. You can donate several pairglasses. Can you talk about the different ways, even because you'retrying to spread it across the country even going to your optometrist? Couldyou talk to us a little bit about how we might be able to help in thisendeavor of the eyes of a champion a big push? We would lack up tonitrusfrom around the country to we ask tom tis to donate twenty exams per year,twining ames and twenty per glasses, which they're probably doing anyway,because we all have that need to help others. This is just an organizedpergin, that's through the school nurse, and so we can track everyone, that'sgetting them, and then the school nurse is following that child. To make surethat the thing about children is that they don't know that they can't see.Brandon didn't know that he couldn't see individual leaves on the trees. Hejust thought that's the way it was, and young kids assume that they're stupidor or not getting it or i don't. I can't pick this up like everyone else,and so they need that push to be able a...

...somebody to make go, identify theproblem and then, if they can't afford him to give them those classes, if theyname, and so our air pushed this summer is just for optometrist throughout thecountry to sign up and then once you donate, the exams in the glasses willgo into the school systems close by and let them know that those were available.It's an easy web base, passporte ted through the nurses, and so we hope tonot love anybody out that needs glasses. That wants them awesome past them. Theyare puntas to a great job. I mean this. These children need this, be would liketo say the ponatis get on allowed them to see, but through the foundation welike to help give them a vision of a rider future, so every child, whetherthat's in michigan, whether that's in california, you we get out of theseother states, every child that re seats pre, i care, will get a copy ofbrandon's book as mac champion books. So they can see and read about this guythat overcame all these obstacles and that they also can do whatever they settheir minted. That's awesome. I didn't realize that there's a book so there'salso a book called the eyes of a champion, but i love that divinestmovie, first of it out now, so that that is a bait of. I think it's on theamazon, fantastic, its fantastic. I get that at a base i'll get that for sureto and rachel will make sure that we put that in the show note so folks,folks that are listening. Seventy five percent of us, including myself, i'mplanning to do this right away to work with the birls worth foundation to workwith marty and vicky to see what impact that i can have through my optometrist.We're not talking about a lot of money here, but we're talking aboutincredible impact for those less fortunate that don't have the abilityto have some of these things like basic, i care and what a great way to kind ofsummarize brandon's legacy when i think about brandon. The first thing i thinkabout is seeing you know i just visually seeing this hulk of a man, ahulk of a human being wearing these black rim, glasses and just kind ofstanding. Proud is really awesome, so you have our commitment and for all thelisteners that we have i'd, ask you to just join us in helping this foundationagain, it's the brandon burls work at org. You can find out more information.Rachel will put it in the show note. So i'd like to just recap and summarize,marty and vicky. Thank you so much for just sharing your thoughts of thisincredible human being who graced this earth for such a little period of time.But yet we're still talking about him. Twenty years later, the greatest walkon and college football history, the burls worth trophy named after him, atwo time all fec, first team, all american third round, nfl draft choice,but most important, just an incredibly faithful and incredible human being anda servant in not his words but his actions to all those around him. I'll,never forget the story. I thank you so much for being a part of our podcasttoday and we just wish you nothing but blessings for this foundation. Like you.Thank you. We appreciate the opportunity to to share brandon storybecause we think it's powerful. It's our passion. To do that. A man, a mengo raise your backs. Go halls o go razor backs. I think we all just becamearkansas football fans if you want to help support brandon's legacy and vickyand marty's work and really how can you not go to the show notes? We've linkedup a landing page there, where you can find information on how to donate andto spread the word to your own eye doctor to help kids in need, it's thebrandon, bols worth foundation or audible, ready to help support thesegreat organizations. What a story! I hope that you can take your own lessonsof passion and perseverance from brandon's life and legacy. Thank youfor listening at force management. We're focused ontransforming sales organizations into...

...elite teams, are proven methodologies.Deliver programs that build company alignment and fuel repeatable revenuegrown. Give your teams the ability to execute the gross strategy at the pointof sale. Our strength is our experience. The proof is in our results. Let's getstarted visit us at force. Management com. You've been listening to theaudible, ready podcast to not miss an episode subscribe to the show in yourfavorite podcast player until next time. I.

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