The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

The Brandon Burlsworth Story

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you want to be "the top 2%", become an elite seller in your organization, and propel your career to the next level — take spirit from Brandon Burlsworth's UnCommon story. Sales leaders, share it with your sales reps and managers.

Told in the movie Greater, Brandon's life was one of grit, dedication and hard work. But, he didn't start out that way. He started out as a young player, with a big goal, not unlike most sales athletes. Brandon went from a walk-on freshman football player at the University of Arkansas to become a 1st-Team All American, who was drafted into the NFL by the Indianapolis Colts. It's speculated that just 2% of all football players make it into the NFL. Hear the story to see how you can be greater every day.

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Brandon had an incredible impact, notonly for himself with his focus and drive and determination, but he also hadan impact on those around him. You're listening to the audible ready podcast,the show that helps you and your team's sell more faster. will feature salesleaders sharing their best insights on how to create a sales engine that helps youfuel repeatable revenue growth, presented by the team at force management, a leaderin B tob sales effectiveness. Let's get started. Hello, I'm Rachel ClapMiller with force management. Thank you for joining us for this episode of theAudible Ready Sales Podcast, and what an episode it is. We love usingsports analogies at force and the reason we do is because they're often a greatexample of people working towards a common goal, overcoming obstacles, trusting the process,etc. All the things we as salespeople are trying to do every day. So today a special story for you. It's the story of Brandon Burlsworth.You may know it. It's featured in a movie called greater that youcan find now on Netflix. Brandon was a walk on for the University ofArkansas football team, a walk on who went on to be awarded a scholarship. He won all SEC offensive guard in nineteen ninety seven, in Nineteen NinetyEight, all conference honors and was named first team all American. He wasa third round draft pick by the Indianapolis Colts. If you think about thattrajectory, it's really amazing and a tribute to his character and work ethic.Tragically, ten days after the draft he was killed in a car accident onhis way home from school to attend church with his mom. Brandon's brother,Marty, was sixteen years older than Brandon and was very much a father figureto him. Now Marty and Marty's wife, Vicki carry on his legacy by headingup the Brandon Burlsworth Foundation. They're both featured in that movie greater.They're committed to helping kids in need. You'll hear about their work in thisepisode. John Kaplan talks with Marty and Vicky about Brandon's legacy, his commitmentto be greater and how uncommon he was. I think you'll enjoy the conversation.Here we go. It's my great pleasure to introduce to our listening audienceMarty and Vicky Burlsworth, the family of the legend Brandon Burlsworth, the greatestwalk on and college football history. Just to just a great honor to speakwith you both today and I'm really really looking forward to our conversation. Thankyou for being here with us. Thank you. Thank you, John.It's a it's our honor pleasure to be here. Fantastic, fantastic. Hey. So I was introduced to Brandon's legacy. Actually, I remember Brandon in Ibelieve it was, is it ninety nine, when Michigan Play Arkansas inthe was it the citrus bowl? Citrus Bowl, Orlando in the citrus bowl, and he was an absolute dominant force. I remember hearing his story. Ijust remember him from back then. And then the movie. I gota phone call from my brother Joe and he said, Hey, have youseen this movie about the greatest walk on and College Football History? And Icouldn't remember Brandon's name at the time and and he said Hey, it's onNetflix, by the way. The the movie is called Greater and it's onNetflix. It's a musty for the folks. We're going to dig into it onthis podcast and in really talk about kind of Brandon's legacy. It's anunbelievably powerful story. But my brother called me said have you seen the movie? And I and I said, well, I remember the guy. And thenwhen I watched the movie and saw the legacy unfold and and the tragicending, it just really really hit home...

...and we just reached out to youfolks and said We'd love to have you on our podcast and and really talkabout Brandon's legacy. So the so the first question that I have for youam already is you know, you have been really out there keeping Brandon's legacyand in memory alive. Why was it important for you to to to makesure that others new brandon story? Yeah, that's that's a really good question,John. I mean brandon worked so hard for so long and I've Iremember this little guy trying to play baseball. Wasn't a very good athlete. Icoached him as he got a little bit older. I was a juniorhigh baseball coach just in the summer. Nothing professional, but had my teamthat I'd had for years and I knew the struggles. I mean not justme, our family people on our hometown of Harrison arcis. I knew thestruggles, knew the trials and all the you know everything he went through andyou know, after his tragic accident, after the NFL draft. You wejust couldn't let that end right at that time. He had done too muchand been such a great role model, not only for kids but, youknow, for for everyone, for just, you know, fremit this can doattitude and believing in yourself and having, you're having a strong faith and andworking hard. So we were there on the you know, when itwhen it was all taking place, all through those years and we just couldn'tlet it end. We're really, really thankful that you didn't let it endand I just think with Brandon story, I don't think if it would haveended. I think that his legacy was meant to go on and on andon and and Vicky, on that note, you work with the Brandon Burlsworth Foundationand you're a big part of you both are a big part of that. But Vicky, had like your perspective on what do you think most resonatesfor folks with Brandon Story from your point of view? Good question. Ithink one of the things is that that Brandon, we all need a rolemodel. We just need somebody look at to and sometimes you want that roleall that you can have your children look at you. But Brandon came from, you know, struggling and and overweight when he was younger and he justdecided in him his will and his faith that he was going to transform himself. And I think any of us want to think that tomorrow is going tobe a better it and we need to get our act together and get backin our faith and that we can change to be that person that we wantto be in Brandon did that. So to me he's just an example toeverybody of somebody that that was the ultimate I can do it, that youknow, he didn't put his head lated circumstances determine what he was going todo. Yeah, I heard a quote. I don't know if it came fromBrandon or was about Brandon. Nothing given, everything earned. Yeah,and when you think about for our listeners, that you know, worldwide listeners,he's known as the greatest walk on in College Football History and let mejust explain what that means. What that means is in college athletics there areat Athletic Scholarships and the story goes that Brandon was born and raised to playfor Arkansas and to he wanted to be a member of the razorback, Arkansasrazorback football team, and he wanted that ever since he was a little boyand he decide and he's a late bloomer, so I'm going to ask you alittle bit about that, Marty, in just a second. But he'sa late bloomer. So there were no scholarships available. I want you tothink about that. Everybody else is getting recruited to a school to accompany towhat have view and you're not one of them. That's getting recruited to yourideal place that you want to go to. And there wasn't the brandon wasn't agood football player. There are plenty of places for him to be ableto use his talents, but he was so focused and determined that he decidedto walk on, which means join a football team without an athletic scholarship.And the rest is and he did that...

...at Arkansas, and the rest isjust in and an incredible story. So, Marty, what I'd like to talka little bit about will kind of break this down into kind of forsegments. You know, Brandon's determination is impact on others. From a coachingpoint of view, since you have kind of a coaching background and you interactedwith their with the coaches, and then we'll talk about, you know,Vicky, the legacy that's that's really been created in the beautiful job that youall are doing with the foundation and Brandon's legacy. But let's let's dig ina little bit to the determination and focus and desire. And Marty, Ibelieve that you were your you're the older brother, your Brandon's older brother,and there's a significant kind of age difference and in looking at the story,how really blessed I think Brandon was to have you in his life as thefather figure. And would you mind just kind of talking about the focus,the desire, the resiliency, the late bloomer? Just tell us a littlebit about Brandon's early life, right he I mean as a when we speak, you know, to youth groups, are elementary schools, always stressed tothem that brandom is just like anyone else. He wasn't a future all American.At that time you didn't see that at all. You didn't see anathlete at all, really you didn't. You really didn't see that work ethicearly on, had just like any kid. He was basically, you know,he make excuses for why I strike out I'm striking it out of,you know, something somebody else's fault. So he and I would have thosetalks and I would tell him, I said, as long as this is, you know, when he's ten or eleven years old. So we haveto keeping that consideration. I's ever, as long as long as it's somebodyelse is fault, that's not going to get any better. One of thatage. He really I don't think that he didn't want to hear that.You know too much of wall open. He got up old enough to beon my my baseball team, thirteen through fifteen year euro but he would alwayscome out and practice with us. One day's a little chunky. I wantedto run sprints with us after practice, and he did and he did,and that was a work ethic there. He started getting more determined and Idon't I do not think any creadit whatsoever for what he became. But whenhe got into our Lee or in our age group, he knew that.I would just tell them say, you know, you're gonna have to doright. Either lose a little weight. We're going to lose a little weight, we're going to work out, or I'm going to you know, wewon't play, I'm not going to play very much on the next game.Always lost the way worked hard that Vicki remembers many nights with the in ourdriveway with the car light zone and I'm catching him and he were trying tomake a picture out of him and and you say in baseball, and youknow, I've got a break down your mechanics and change them, get yousome good mechanics, because he mechanics are on. He had no mechanics.So we did have to worry about any of that. They were you.We had a clean slate, but we he worked just really put in.I mean we will be out there freezing temperatures all year long and then bythe next year he made the All star team and made the world series teamas a picture and baseball was really big. That was has always been my favoritesport. It was actually Brandon's, but we love football to but aroundthat time once he you know, you can see the work at the kickingin and I didn't I didn't have to push him when he was a littleguy. I was really just like it is in the movie when the lawnsnot mode. People asked, is that real? Yeah, that's that wasreal, because he just be set setting on the couch eating chips or layingin the floor and I thought, man, you know, I guess I feltlike a nine year old should, you know, have some type ofwork atic. I don't know why. I guess at that time I kneweverything, but I didn't. But he's sure showed me. So what's amazingabout his story, though, is in...

...you're all story, is that youknow Brandon. I think brandon growing up in a, you know, adifficult environment and and you know certainly wasn't given a lot but you know,surrounded by love, which is an awesome part of the story, and youguys played a big part of that. But he's growing up kind of akind of a normal kid, and then something happens. Is there, Vicky? You Watch this and you watch the interaction with Marty and Brandon, isthere anything that you can remember as like something that flipped a switch for him, something that changed from an intense motivation and desire? Is there anything youguys can put your fingers on on that one? We go back and lookabout it, because he's on inspiring to us as he is at the restof the world. We just Tut to live with him and and be aroundin seven but he was always wonderful mom, wonderful mom. Dad wasn't around asmuch, alcoholic, a great guy. You would love him to meet himif he's passed on now, but but you know, you just didwasn't there. And so when he started get involved in church, you kindof start seeing that mind and I remember one time we'd had him in throughat my mother's house and and he had hit was showing out. I thinkhe was probably maybe six or seven, and I said, Brandon, wouldGod want you to do that? And you could just see his mind workingand he stopped. I mean did he just really understood that his faith wasstarting to develop, you know, those early years and then later on,as far as football is concerned, his best friend was invited to the AllStar game and so when went to that and I think that is when itkicked in that he wanted to do that. You know that his bread best friendwas a year older, and so, you know, I think it's justlike the rest of us. Things happened that to me wouldn't have madeany effect, but to brandon into the stage that where he was at inhis life right then. That was the pivot that God needed to push himtoward where he wanted into be. HMM, how about you, Marty? Yeah, I mean that's that's that's true. When he was attended at first highschool Allstar game for his friend that that that kicked it in. Butyou know, I think it's a good lesson to learn from this is,you know, Brandon came from very, very humble but the anything I thinkwe all look sometimes for. You know, I had start. And what's soinspiring that Brandon story is, you know, there was no head start, there was no he came, you know, with just really with it, but very little chance of making it, you know, which for a lotof us would would make us want to put I would quick with youknow. I thought I don't have the scholarship or whatever that might be,or whatever career were in. You know, someone's got a hit start on me. So you know I'm going to I'm going to mail it in.And but not not with the not with Brandon. It just what he hada big gross spark between his sophomore and junior year in high school. Now, when I have a head a baseball all the time, I didn't seethat and I was with and we were in the same household, but wewere with him all the time. We didn't notice until he got this wasbefore. You worked out all summer like high school student. Yeah, partyou know, you're in the weight room all summer where it wasn't the wayback to the early nineties. But his high school coach, Tommy ties,pulled me side. He said what have you been feeding that Bole and supprettyman. He said he's grown three or four inches this summer. Oh,I didn't. I didn't notice that. So but also at that same time, seemlock something mentally with Brandon clicked. It took on a physical growth,that a mental growth and a vision. He had a video. I thinkfootball is. I could, you know, maybe continue to play outside of highschool, and now that what he didn't play hardly any he stood onsideline his sophomore year, junior years split time with a senior. Now hewas a high school senior seventeen years graduate high school, Seventeen years old.Yeah, his senior year and I've gone back and looked at a lot offilm. My goodness, something I knew...

...he was dominant that when you goback and played on both sides of the ball, but you had to youhad to game playing or on the other side, because and then he'd stillrun you down. So yeah, fast and this was someone that, youknow, two three years earlier, never saw the field. And what's themajor uncordinated, but just worked himself, just putting in the work when youdon't, when the ones looking. No glory there, but that's yeah,the Games are right. It's amazing story because when you look at he's likethe classic example of a late bloomer and I love his story because, likein today in high school athletics, and you know, these kids are declaringnow in the eighth grade and you know they're getting scholarships in the eighth andninth grade and and you just have people that are late developers. And Ihad forgotten that brandon was a p graduated as a senior at like seventeen yearsold. And so let's talk about he shows up at Arkansas, his dreamand you know Arkansas was you know, they were they kind of had aplan with the people that they recruited and and they allowed him to come andwalk on. And and so now he's there. And one thing that struckme in the story and I'd like to talk a little bit about impact.So Brandon had an incredible impact, not only for himself with this focus anddrive and determination, but he also had an impact on those around him,and the story did the movie greater on Netflix. A highly, highly recommendit for those that are listening. It did a really, really good jobof kind of the impact that brandon had on those around him. And Iknow Marty and Vicky, you've known his teammates for probably a couple of decadesnow, and and just describe a little bit of what you guys witnessed andwhat you hear those people that lined up and played with Brandon. So inthe beginning he comes out, he's out of shape, not not out ofshape, but not in ready shape to compete at a major university in oneprobably the toughest competitive level and college football in the SEC and so people arekind of looking at that maybe like why is this kid here? And thenin a very short period of time he earned a scholarship in his first yearand in a very short period of time he is not different. He peopleare migrating towards him. So you tell me your experiences of hearing the storiesof how people kind of migrated towards the humility and the difference that that Brandonwas displaying. Right. He I mean he very quiet and we talked abouthe came in out of shape, basically. That's correct. He was told inrecruiting business, and these were recruiting visits, that maybe I had hadto make a phone call to get the visit, but they did in Botus over and took it. took an adverse in him, but it wasgoing to be as eventually it's going to be a walk home and then eventuallyas a preferred walk home. And he was told, just like it saysin the movie, that you're not big enough. And so once again hegrew, but that was in the wrong way. He gained weight, butit was not the right kind of way that we're ever, that summer heand I would go to white room a lot, but he was, youknow, he was just putting on the wrong kind of way and I onceagain, I did not realize that would since I was within a lot coachties before he showed up. Our when over to Fayette Belle, Arkansas,home of the University of Arkansas, said well, he's soft and I didn'twaste I'm sending. Man, he's getting white. Let's yeah, he wantthey said that he's that's not kind of what they wanted. So okay.So, and I didn't even notice it. So when over and was challenged bythe coaching staff that he had to get that that weight that he puton off, and that was a struggle. I can remember many time. Italked to him every night at ten...

...minutes after ten, and I hehe said, I'm on the what the trainer called Green Label in the room. It's been basically and Salads. Yeah, be labeled on it. You canneed it other other than that. No. So that wasn't a lotof fun, but not everything's. But what's amazing about story is they toldthem, said, if you want to play here, you got to showup and be over three hundred pounds m and so he listens to exactly whatthey told him to do. They did tell him how to put the threeon. It's not like he was cutting the corner. He's like, okay, I got to be three hundred pounds. What I love about his story,though, is they said okay, then he shows up, he says, I did what you told me to do, and for coaches listening andfor a business, coaches listening. You don't only have to tell somebody whatwhat you need them to do. You got to make sure they know howto do it and then you got to keep in communication with them to makesure that it's going correctly. And so he shows up. I think thenumber, I don't know, twenty or you know, twenty or thirty poundswith the wrong body makeup and the kid says okay. They tell him yougot to change it, you got to lose the weight and then put itback on muscle. And the kid does it. So he did everything thatthey told him to do exactly. Yeah, and just think about that and Ireally have it looked at it exactly like that John Before. But hecould have said, right then, will you told me put the way down. I did it, and now that's not good enough, that's not theway. You know, he would do what his coaches asked of him becausehe believed in his coaches. He trusted his coaches and coach Tommy Tisy,sighschool coach told the coaches at the university point before he arrived, said what, make sure whatever you telling that's what you want done, because he willdo it. They'll do what you say, but make sure it's exactly what youwant to do, because if you say take a two and a halfinch step on a drill, it's going to be two and a half.If you want three, you better say three. He was going to beprecise. But going back to the white thing, he could have got thesturge right the end and then said well, I'm done. You know, hetold me put the weight in it. He did not listen to his coaches. Took it off and then transformed and set up within a year andwas a totally different in fact, he looking back about a year later.Any of the photos we've got a him around a time period before he wentthe university and mom would have them out locked on desplace, high school graduation. He's like put that away. He did not like the way he looked. He was fine with it at the time, but once he had transformedhe's like, man, I don't like the way let's I'm a little UNcareful of what what we share on our social media and other things. Ikeep him in mind because I know some of those photos in man too crazyabout so we don't we don't put it he's he's a big old boy,but it's so so let's stay on this topic of coaches. I know thatin the movie there were wonderful stories and you can't you can't make them all, you can't get them all in a movie, but he was just blessed, and beginning with you guys and his mother, to have just great influencesin his life. But the coaches that showed up at the high school coaches, the college coaches, and then the big theme that I really really sawwas we have this concept that we talked about a force management of great leadersand great coaches have the ability to meet people wherever they are and there aresome examples of coaches that brandon had which met him wherever he was and brandonwas willing to put in the work. They were willing to do the workwith him, you know, above and beyond what the other people were doing, and he's like the classic example of a diamond in the rough. Andso diamonds in the rough they have to be harvested, they have to bepolished and I was really struck in the story and Brandon Story, by therewere some great examples and I know they were a conglomerative of many coaches andthat kind of stuff. But he was pretty blessed to have people really noticethat he was different and I know that...

...was he brought it to the tablebecause he was different, he was humble, he was an incredible worker, butyou know in life and in business sometimes that doesn't always get noticed.And four coaches out there and leaders out there, I want you to listenas Marty and Vicki just talk about some of the impactful coaches and Brandon's lifethat really saw the diamond in the rough and helped him take it to thenext level. Could you guys comment on that? Remember one of when brand'sbest friends, one of the Lineman, said that he it bothers him thathe does not remember Randon the first year in that something. Yeah, see, he's really this giant that everybody and then they're one of the Lineman whoturns up to is one of his best friends doesn't remember. And he wasso quiet and putting in the work and and doing it behind the scenes andwasn't looking for attention or trying to get position himself. He was just focusedand picky. That gives me goosebumps. One of his best friends says hedoesn't remember him. Somebody who goes on and becomes a two time sec allSEC player, becomes the first team all American and gets drafted in the thirdround. That just gave me chill bumps. One of his best friend says,I don't remember him as a freshman. Yeah, which means he completely transformedhim stuff and we're we miss things if we're not looking for them.Just like the coaching, you got to look for expect good things that aresome people because they're going to surprise you. That just gave me chill bumps.Maybe chill bumps. Marty, your comments about some of the coaches.Yeah, Brandon had, I mean blast to have a lot of great coaches. We talked to talk about before John. But he's one thing about it,you know, when I think they really took the brandon one thing.He obviously wasn't the Big Talker, super humble, but when you see someonethat's willing to put in the work even when it's not paying off. Herein Arkansas, those that aren't familiar with the razorbacks, we have no professionalteams in Arkansas. We haven't another division one school in the state and otherthan that we've got smaller schools, but razorbacks are everything. Razorbacks it's astatewide pride. There's this, you know, there's only it's a that's a onestate school. I mean it's just that's that's it. Everything for razorbackcan be at smaller schools. On the weekend. Maybe you've got a studentat one of the smaller schools and we were university last weekend talking about thisand the talk in the stands if the hogs are playing at the same time. But people in stands what's the score? What's the score? Even though they'reat another game, they want to know. Keep up with that,with that razorbacks school work. But you know, just back to Brandon's workat think when you see someone willing to sacrifice Fordan for no glory at all. Coach Houston, that what he arrived on campus and remember him telling thestory about off Satan workouts. Are the off season workouts, going to theweight room. You know, in Arkansas everyone's got their battle private we wecall the hogs wood pick. So we called the hogs and one mind thatstuff out to me said there's not there's not too many people calling the hogsat thirty in the morning in the weight room. Yeah, any that's prettypowerful right there, a member not getting any result, we're not getting anyglory, but man, were working so that you know that day will come. So, Marty, when I first met you and Vicki one of thestories that I just absolutely fell in love with and I wanted to ask ifit was true, because I know Hollywood's got to do some things to condensetopics and and, you know, keep people's attention, which I didn't thinkwas at all necessary in Brandon's story. It turned out not to be necessary. So there's one story that I really love. New Coach comes in Houston, not the previous coach, the they just made a coaching change Houston.That comes into the field house at you...

...know, I don't know at what'sits dark. So it's after everybody is gone and he saw brandon in thereworking on his technique and he didn't really know brandon that well yet, andso he's like Hey, who's in here and how'd you get in here?And and so you know, Brandon asked for, you know, permission tobe able to do that in Houston. Nut goes down and talks about thatand the impact. This is the part that I really loved. So thecoach, the new leader, came in, had a decision and probably said,Hey, look, I got a couple of years to rebuild here,so I can go with the younger guys. And this was big impact for mewhen I was thinking about business. Brandon was so impactful to others aroundhim that Houston nuts saw that. So first of all he had a firsthandexperience with him after hours, like it like at night when all the lightswere off in the field house, and then he had a conversation with Brandonabout brandon saying hey, let us finish what we started. And Houston nutsgetting paid a lot of money. He's got a plan to come in.He's a new leader and the new and the leaders. I want you tojust listen to this, see what's on the ground, see the leaders,the the players that are on the ground, see the positive where your pockets ofinfluence, of positivity and resilience, and Brandon was one of those.And then they show they cut to the next scene. I don't want togive too much of the movie away, but this really impacted me. Andthen Brandon's leading the juniors and seniors and in the first day of practice,and you could tell Houston nuts mine was just like, okay, we're goingto go with these, we're going to let them finish what they started,and that almost never happened. So, Martie, would you just kind ofcomment on that, that situation where a coach comes in, has a planto probably do something, bringing his own recruits or what have your, lookson the ground, looks at the ground level season incredible talent and incredible leaderand decides to partner with that leader and make great things happen. Yeah,exactly, and I mean and he had every opportunity because you've got an offensiveline, our offensive lind going into that year for that next season. Forout of the five or seniors, they were going into the third year ofstarting that they a Grand Garrett, Chad, ebananty, Brandon and Russell Brown.These guys were that. I mean everyone knew that we were right onthe cusp of really being good the year before. I can understand why theywere looking at changing because we were ranked near the end that at the verybottom and rushing yards, which that's an insult to an offensive lineman. Yeah, you can't run the ball switch means you're not very physical, but youknow coaching up saw what he had there and saw that what what Brandon was, what he came from and the impact and the influence that he had onhis teammates, not only on his teammates, but you know all that. Allthe coaches, and I mean when any player out there knows that,that's listening, that's played. You Know College football most and there's not verymany that are favorite of a coaching championship and Brandon and that team was nota favorite. Coach Ford was the head coach at the time. And itis just almost there, I mean when this team was going to be good, but we've had to backtoback for in seven seasons. You just can't continuethat. And but coach Broyles and in our longtime legendary athletic director at Arkansas, you know, really did a great job of Brandon Houston and I wasexcited about it once he got here. But I'm just like everybody else.You know, you want to, we know we're right at the just rightthere about to make things happen, but I don't coach nut took what hehad took what those guys had put in all those years of work and theyknew one to know that was that offensive. Blind was tight and if they knew, they didn't have to they didn't...

...have to verbalize anything when the Bobsnap. They knew one another's tendencies and worked as a unit. So andhad formed such a great story, I think. And then they went onto in the next two years. I don't they competed for the SEC championship. They won one of them. Writer. Or do they win to we wonthe West? Yeah, we went. We won the West a couple oftimes. And when hid for the West that Brandon senior year, andthat's just because of just terrible, terrible game at Tivacy, and not aterrible game of a game we should have won. That is now in thelegendary archives of the SEC and they will replay that game in it network hereand I try not to watch it. Hey, I of a Michigan Fan, so I'm right there with you. I'm right there with you on someof those disappointments. But so okay. So let's just recap a couple ofthings. Coaches and leaders that are out there. When you first you know, get your assignment to go in and take over a new team. Youget called in to turn around this team. Most people make plans without even meetingthe players, without even understanding what's on the ground, and you couldmiss an opportunity to see a potential future all American and an NFL draft pickand have that person kind of help and partner with you to just enforce managementterms. We call that level four players. Level four players have a massive impacton those around them. And then, if you are a player, ifyou are an employee and you're listening to this story, I want youto think about Brandon's impact. A new coach comes in and Brandon just keptdoing what he was doing, offered his ability to be a great impact,a great influence for the new coaching staff, to be a help to the newcoaching staff. You're not powerless if there's a coaching shift or a leadershipshift. If you're doing the right things, things will be things will be noticed. So all right, so, Vicki, I'd like to shift gearsa little bit and one of the things that we really love to do onthis audible ready podcast is this story just really, really touched our heart.Brandon Stories and credible story, your stories of the way that you are keepingBrandon's legacy alive and what you're doing for others is just awesome. And we'retalking about Brandon Burlsworth, the most famous and greatest walk on and college footballhistory. They now have a burrows worth trophy and some incredible names like BakerMayfield and several others that are in the NFL. This is an award that'sgiven out every year. Nothing given, everything earned. Mentality. Brandon wentfrom walk on the two time all SEC, first team all American and a thirdround draft choice for the colts. What I also love is that inthat time, and I believe he is the own, was at the timethe only razorback football player that earned his master's degree before his final game,and that just when I read that, I think I read that a coupleof days ago, I'm like, but of course, but of course,what a what an absolute incredible human being. Let's shift gears a little bit andtalk about the foundation. Vicky, would you tell us a little bitabout the foundation and what you all have been doing to keep Brandon's legacy alive? Brandon is no longer here due to a tragic situation which actually made mecry. I'm fifty eight years old and I watch movies and you know thatone. That one made me cry. And let's talk a little bit aboutthe legacy in the foundation. Brandon Burrows Work Dot Org is where you canfind information about the foundation. Rachel will put in the show notes a link. Will actually have a landing page which will link right to the foundation.Let's dig into really what's most important is the legacy that brandon created and whatyou guys are all doing with the foundation. So, Vicky, tell us aboutit. It won't surprise you at...

...all to know that Marty en brandonhad already spoke about when he knew that the NFL was probably going to bea real possibility. Had already talked about helping children with the money that hehad. He knew that he would make some difference. Brandon already had saidand have conversations about, you know, helping others in the NFL. Youknow they always have the groups of the INFA players bring the the groups ofchildren to help them. You know, pay man didn't that? That's justreally common. And so we they'd already talked about the idea of what wenow call the girls kids, which is probably what were more famous for justbecause we bring underprivileged children to Arkansas Razor Back Games and to Indianapolis Code Games, so that that was an easy thing. And then football camps. You know, we wanted to kind of get those Brandon's friends together so that weyou know, a lot of this was it was all in brand's memory,but it was out of our grief that we had to Marty and I callit sink or swim. You know, first the first year was tough andthe movie kind of shows the what happened that weekend. That was probably moreour first year. We yeah, really struggled on how as we've lived forthis child. You know, he we gone to Marty and I went toevery game and Miss Barbar them on every game. We missed two in fouryears and we just had lived with these families and the players and what happened. So that girls kids and the end we realized that that brain was sowell known for those glasses, and so that's what we're really passionate about.Our summer push is to get our eyes with champion where we go in andkids in school that don't have insurance, don't have means to do it,but are still trying. They're still, you know, they don't have governmenta that they're trying to families are trying, but so those kids in Arkansas weput glasses on about a thousand children a year through our eyes of thechampion program and we want to push that out. We're now in Louisiana andwe're trying to push that out nationwide. So that's I love that. Ilove that and if you get a chance, google a picture of Brandon. There'sa story about how he was having some struggles in a game and theygot a pair of glasses for him and he didn't have a lot of moneyto be able to you know, and he asked me to get, youknow, designer glasses, but he had to get the glasses also to beable to withstand the contact. They're probably be the most famous athletic pair ofglasses today. They're the thick black rim glasses and and you know, sixfoot for three hundred and ten pounds would just knock your lights out wearing thoseglasses. It's just one of my favorite things about Brandon. But to ouraudience, to look, there's seventy five percent of all people that are listeningto this are wearing some type of corrective lenses, and so we would liketo just, you know, put a bug out there. We love doingthese podcasts because we also point you in the direction of some wonderful foundations,because we know our community is really interested in serving others in so can youtalk a little bit more the one that you guys have a big push onright now? It's called the eyes of a champion and the concept and someof the things that people can do? Obviously you can donate and you candonate pair of glasses, you can donate several pair of glasses that can youtalk about the different ways, even because you're trying to spread it across thecountry, even going to your optometress. Could you talk to us a littlebit about how we might be able to help in this endeavor of the eyesof a champion? Our big push. We would like optommetrous from around thecountry to we, as COMTERESTER, donate twenty exams per year, Twenty Xamsand twenty prayer glasses, which they're probably doing anyway, because we all havethat need to help others. This is just an organized program that's through theschool nurse and so we can track everyone that's getting them and then the schoolnurse is following that child to make sure that the thing about children is thatthey don't know that they can't see. Brandon didn't know that he couldn't seeindividually. He's on the trees. He just thought that's way it was,and young kids assume that they're stupid or or not getting it, or Idon't I can't pick this up like everyone else. And so they need thatpush to be able to somebody to make...

...you identify the problem and then,if they can't afford him, to give them those glasses that they need.And so our our push this summer is just for optometrist throughout the country tosign up and then, once you donate, the exams in the glasses will gointo the school systems close by and let them know that those were available. It's an easy web based past were protected through the nurses and so itwe hope to not leave anybody out the needs glasses that wants them. Awesome, awesome, they are. Punctis do a great job. I mean thesechildren need this. We we like to say, the OPTOMETRISS, you know, allow them to see. But through the foundation we like to help givethem a vision of a rider future. So every child, whether that's inMichigan, whether that's in California, we get out in these other states,every child that receives free I care, will get a copy of Brandon's bookas of a champion books so they can see and read about this guy thatovercame all these obstacles and that they also can do whatever they set their mindto. That's awesome. I didn't realize that there's a book. So there'salso a book called the eyes of a champion. I love that. Dis a movie version of it out now, so that is a by the way. Think it's on Amazon and fantastic website. Fantastic. I get thatedit piece. I'll get that for sure too, and Rachel will make surethat we put that in the show notes. So, folks, folks that arelistening, seventy five percent of us, including myself, I'm planning to dothis right away, to work with the Borlsworth Foundation, to work withMarty and Vicky to see what impact that I can have through my optometry us. We're not talking about a lot of money here, but we're talking aboutincredible impact for those less fortunate. That don't have the ability to have someof these things like basic I care and what a great way to kind ofsummarize Brandon's legacy. When I think about Brandon, the first thing I thinkabout is seeing, you know, just visually seeing this hulk of a man, a haulk of a human being wearing these black rim glasses and just kindof standing proud is really awesome. So you have our commitment and for allthe listeners that we have, I'd ask you to just join us in helpingthis foundation again. It's the brandon burrows worth DOTORG. You can find outmore information. Rachel will put it in the show note. So I'd liketo just recap and summarize. Marty and Vicki thank you so much for justsharing your thoughts of this incredible human being who graced this earth for such alittle period of time, but yet we're still talking about him twenty years later. The greatest walk on and college football history, the Burlsworth trophy named afterhim, a two time all SEC first team, all American, third roundNFL draft choice, but most important, just an incredibly faithful and incredible humanbeing and a servant, in not his words but his actions, to allthose around him. I'll never forget the story. I thank you so muchfor being a part of our podcast today and we just wish you nothing butblessings for this foundation. Thank you and thank you. We appreciate the opportunityto share Brandon story because we think it's powerful and it's our passion today.There, Amen, Amen, go razorbacks, go homes, go razorbacks. Ithink we all just became Arkansas football fans. If you want to helpsupport Brandon's legacy and Vicky and Martie's work, and really, how can you not, go to the show notes. We've linked up a landing page therewhere you can find information on how to donate and to spread the word toyour own eye doctor to help kids in need. Fit's the Brandon Burlsworth Foundationor audible ready to help support these great organizations. What a story. Ihope that you can take your own lessons of passion and perseverance from Brandon's lifeand legacy. Thank you for listening. At force management, we're focused ontransforming sales organizations into elite teams. Are...

Proven methodologies deliver programs that build companyalignment and fuel repeatable revenue growth. Give your teams the ability to execute thegrowth strategy at the point of sale. Our strength is our experience. Theproof is in our results. Let's get started. Visit US at force MANAGEMENTCOM. You've been listening to the audible ready podcast. To not miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Until next time,.

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