The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast
The Audible-Ready Sales Podcast

Episode · 5 years ago

The Uncommon Story - Who's Doing This?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

John Kaplan shares a motivational story about being uncommon.

Hello, I'm Rachel clepmiller thanks forjoining us for this podcast. Today we are going to use this recording tooffer a little motivation. Those of Youe had one of our trainings with JohnCaplin likely now the uncommon story and that WHO's doing this mantra it'sbecome quite popular with many of our command in the message alum. I evenfind myself saying it at my desk on occasion, so we wanted to share it withyou. Our podcast listeners, John Caplin, is here to share Ip with you today.Take it away John Good Morning Rachel and thanks for this opportunity, I mI'm really kind of excited to justcontemplate this topic. As over the weekend, I had achance to see Tony Dunji, the author of the book. Uncommon who's just had ahuge impact on mee. Personally in you know personal life and business life,but you know he got inducted into the WO thousand and sixteen pro FootballHall of fame. The statistics hundred and forty eightwins over thirteen seasons, culminating...

...in a super bowl and with the coldts intwo thousand and seven. You know thirteen years as a head coach and onlyone losing record, and that was his first year an Tampa Bay. You know, butbut that's not what I really love most about Tony Dungi. You know what I lovemost about Tony Dungi is, is you know, he's an author in the books that I'veread that that that he's written you know the first one I think came out wascalled quiet. Strength was just a really really great read, but then theone that really impacted me was the book uncommon and, as many of youlisteners Kno out there, I'm a father of three great kids, Thera, Emily andJacob, and I've spent most of their lives, encouraging them to be uncommon,and because it's really really hard to be uncommon in this world today and sot the story of just being uncommon. I really had to think about somethingthat was relevant to myself, my family.

Anybody else that I would be speakingto- and I was reminded of a time back in one thousand nine hundred and eightyone when I packed my bags and left for home from Michigan to go, play football at aschool called Boisy state in Idaho. They were the one double ag defendingnational champions and it was just a unbelievably fantastic experience and Ihad the opportunity to transfer closer to home and therned an athleticscholarship to play at at school called Bowling, green and Ohio. Just a dreamcome true for me to be able to play closer to home, and- and I was reallyall excited about it and- and I remember getting a letter from a coach that I didn't know who thecoach was and finding out that the two coachesthat had two position- coaches, that hadprecruted me to to Bowling Green, had takeenother job over the summer and thebasically the letter said: Hey John. We...

...need you to report with the freshman. Idon't know you know, got to gauge your skills, don't know who you are, and youknow it's innocent enough letter. But the way I took it, I wasn't very proudof I I'd love to tell thet listeners that I you know that I was all motivated anddetermined to show this new coaching staff. You know exactly what I was madeof and instead I felt sorry for myself and ate Bom bons and watch daytime TV,and I had a friend back thown. His name was Vince and I stopped showing up inthe gym for a little bit, because I was kind of aggravated. You know the reasonwhy I was aggravated. I had to sit out a year and I would have been like theequivent. I wt would have been twenty years old when I showed up and theyasked me to show up with the eighteen year old freshman and I was justfeeling a little wrong and Vince called me a he said, hey where you been. Ihaven't seen Yot at the gym and I tried to tell him my sad sex story.You know of what was happening to me and he just he said, I'm coming over toget you to go work out and he hung up...

...the phone and I was thinking ofcontemplating you know. Just you know: Advince came to the door just tellingthem hey, I don't feel like working out, but then I was reminded that Vince wassix foot five. Two hundred and ninety five pounds and and Vince comes to the door and says thatwe're going to go work out we're probably going to go work out. So Ifigured well when he comes. You know we'll go to the gym I'll, do a fewgirls look in the mirror and you know get it over with and so we're in thecar and we're traveling towards the gym and and and I look at, we actually drive right past the gymand I'm looking at Vince and I'm saying Ge, you know, Vince, the gym is rightover there and he says: Well, you know we're not going to the gym and hedrives right past the gym and I said Dude where re we going and he saidwe're going to go run and I'm thinking to myself, I'm not going to run. Youknow we might be going to a place, that's going to have running, but I'mnot running, and so we go to a place in...

Michigan just outside the city in aplace called T, Oakland University, and so we get out of the car and we startwalking towards the athletic facilities and- and we come up to the track and Vince walksright past the track- and I say thence where e you going. The track is righthere where you going. He looks at me and he says we're not running there andI said: Where are we going to go run and so for any of the listeners thatare from the Michigan area and Nookan University? If You keep walking pastthat track and walk into the woods, there's a very steep set of hills whichare which are designed to get you from one athletic field to the next athleticfield and before I could even contemplate it. Vince takes off runningup these stairs and Vince is six foot five, two hundred ninety five pounds-and these stairs are so steep at Oakland University that by the time hegets to the top of it he actually looks small and I'm just watching him run upand hes. He comes back running down. He...

Leans in leans his big head into me andhe says: Hey who's doing this and he takes off running up and I'mcontemplating who's doing this, and I'm still feeling sorry for myself and I'mlike. Well, not me, I'm not doing thisting, so he runs up and he comesdown D he's really sweating. Now, by the time he gets down- and he yellsback at me- who's doing this and he runs back up the you know the steps and as I'm watchingthem on of the steps, I'm thinking to myself. You know this is ridiculous. IfI'm here, I'm feeling, like a you, know an idiot, I'm just going to run thesethings, so I start running them and I realize how the bonbonds and daytime TVhas impacted me beas. I gained a little weight and I am huffing and puffing bythe time I get up to the top, but I passed him and he leaned in and saidWHO's doing this and I'm not really able to contemplate. What is he sayingto me as I start to come back down? He leans his head back in and says who'sdoing this and by the time I got up the...

...second time to the top of the steps. Myheart was pounding out of my chest. I'm looking out over a beautiful campus ofOakland University and I absolutely in that moment realized exactly what hewas asking me and in that moment I remember feeling incredibly uncommon,knowing that there was probably a high pop probability that acrossed the youknow my competitive playing field in that moment that I probably was theonly one doing this at that time and it felt fantastic and it was anunbelievable feeling of feeling uncommon doing things that I didn'twant to do, but did it anyways. And so, as I came back down and Vince came backup, I was prepared for him as he leaned his head and he's a little bit moreexhausted this time. You know he looked at me and he said WHO- and he didn'teven get it out, and I said no one and he just looked at me and he said that'sright and then Vince and I you know for several more times- went up and wentdown. These stairs went up and went...

...down these stairs and I just rememberjust an unbelievable feeling that day of being uncommon- and so I've usedthis story not only for myself, I still feelit. You know for myself when those things were the world just does notwant me to be UN common. The world wants me to be very common. My industrywants me to be very common. You know at growth play what we ask our customersto do is extremely uncommon, and I love the feeling I get when I look inpeople's eyes when they realize that what we're asking them to do is veryuncommon and now they're trained to be very uncommon and your customers wantyou to be very uncommon. So so you know you'll hear me tell this story a lotwhen I you know, when I'm with my clients and over the years it's takenon a life of its own. You know with my own son today: Who's a college athleteI love you know after game or what Happn I'll yell out to him or when he'straining during the summer, I'll yell...

...out to him I', say: Hey who's doingthis and Jacob will look back at me and say no one insone, incrediblyincredibly motivating feeling yeah every now and then I'll get an emailfrom someone or I'll, be in tha airport, who yell out Hey Caplin who's doingthis, and I love to yell back no one. So my message Rachel and thanks forGivin the opportunity to share it. My message to the listeners out there isto be uncommon, do on common things and you'll always come out on top. You knowjust listening these podcast, you know as they come out that you put togetherRachel and implementing the great ideas that you bring forth to list to thelisteners is uncommon in itself, and I wish the everybody listening to have anuncommon rest of you year. Awesome. Thank you, John, for sharing.Thank you for your kind words thanks to all of you for joining us and fortaking the time to listen, be uncommon. It's a great phrase to live by we'llsee you next time.

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